questionsam i nuts to move 1.5 miles away just so my kids…

vote-for74vote-against
vote-for36vote-against

Wanting your kids to go to a good school instead of a bad one is very reasonable. Is it possible to stay and the house and send the kids out of district? My parents sent me out of district all of high school and middle school. It just meant that instead of taking a bus, my dad had to drive me on the way to work, and my parents had to pay some sort of small out-of-district fee to the school.

vote-for16vote-against

It might make all the difference in the world to their future, so no, not nuts, at all. If there is another option that give you the best of both worlds, that's great, but if not, and both you and your spouse are on the same page, then kudos to you. I see a lot of parent who sacrifice, to give their kids much less substantial things, and this could have a meaningful impact. Besides, they will hopefully remember it later, when they have a say in your care. : D

vote-for13vote-against

@straub: We looked at doing just that but getting into another school is a "lottery" every year. IF my kids got in then they'd be given preference for the next year but there'd be no guarantees that they'd get to stay in that school. Even looked at private schools, but the cheap ones are $4,000/year... so that would cost at least $64,000 for 2 kids for 8 years. A new house would cost us about $75,000 more than we paid for a current one, but I'm thinking that it might be worth it.

vote-for11vote-against

Nope. Good education is key.

vote-for-11vote-against

No, you're nuts because you want validation from people on the internet, people you've probably never met and probably never will meet.

vote-for13vote-against

Did you consider homeschooling or using a cyber school? My kids are 13- 21 and have been taught at home. One of my sons is now going after a nanotechnology degree, and another daughter is going into digital art. We used to use a correspondence school, but now have a cyber school with real-time classes, which is working very well. It is really sci-fi sounding to say that we send their brains to class (they hear the other students and the teachers, but do not see them. The chalkboard is PowerPoint). It's just cool to have options. Selling your house seems rash, but anything is worth it for your kids.

vote-for10vote-against

It sounds reasonable to aim for better schools, but remember: There are good teachers in bad schools and bad teachers in good schools. You could spend thousands to move and still end up with lesser teachers.

Far more important than the district or the teacher is parental involvement. If your child does not get the support, resources and encouragement he/she needs at home then the best teacher in the world won't be able to help.

vote-for9vote-against

Not really. My parents paid a pile more money for a house twenty some odd years ago when they moved for this very reason. They probably could have gotten 50% more house literally a mile away, but it was in a much worse school district. I personally am glad that I had the opportunity to go to a good public school over a private school or especially homeschooling. I feel like homeschooling is one of those things that can be a disaster depending on the kid. As a kid I was extremely introverted (and still am to an extent), and I think that if I had been home schooled it would have compounded that to an unhealthy level. Going to a big public school forced me out. It would probably be fine if you have a very outgoing child, but for me I think a good public school was extremely helpful in my becoming a fairly well adjusted adult and not a world-hating serial killer.

vote-for4vote-against

@keysmad: K-12 dosen't matter much, the college and degree they choose will.

vote-for7vote-against

Even though I don't have any kids yet, the schools were an important choice for me. Reason was pretty simple; good schools = good neighborhoods. Good neighborhoods = the value is kept.

vote-for4vote-against

What if you move and your children's new school becomes overcrowded...then your local government will likely redistrict and your children might end up in the original "worse" school.

vote-for4vote-against

Not at all, IF you've done the homework & the school, not the district, has superior ratings.
We paid for 12 years of parochial school for my son, even though it's not tax deductible and you still get to pay property(school) taxes. But when half the graduating class got at least 2-year and 1/3 got full rides...duh.
He wound up with a full 4-year academic, so it can pay for itself, if you're sure it's better. Most kids can handle more than is thrown at them, we just worked to minimize the stress.

vote-for4vote-against

how much would you be losing, considering the soft market right now? Count the cost of recent renovations and potential ones on a new house.

If that amount is above a certain dollar amount (this will be determined by local costs in your area) - is private school not an option?

I know i'd take a bath on selling my home right now, so would look at other possibilities first.

vote-for3vote-against

You can also look at an Inter district transfer. Depending on the crowding at the new school it may very well be possible without having to move.

vote-for3vote-against

@elldee: Could you like rent an apartment there during a specific time of year? Or maybe even just rent an address there? Just a thought heh

vote-for5vote-against

@daniel calvin hendra: I disagree entirely. If you haven't hooked the kids on learning and given them the skills they need to learn before they leave High School they won't want to go to college and even if they go to college they won't make it.

vote-for5vote-against

What makes them a really good school? Some test score? Great football team? Every school has its horror stories and bad teachers. We live in the school district where everyone in the area wants to move to, and we still had a bomb threat this year. Have you talked to any of the teachers or parents in the "better" school district?

I vote for homeschooling myself. Best school district there is!

vote-for4vote-against

Students from all over the world come to America to go to college. They would love to answer this question for you. College or high school, its the meaning of a better education.

vote-for4vote-against

@bnbsouthworth: Not a naysayer, but not everyone can or should be homeschooling. Kids have a need to be socialized, they need peer interaction. A parent can be a huge part of that without the possible failure of homeschooling. Just being a major part of the child's life, both at and away from school, is usually sufficient.
Those who believe the school is a babysitter are the problem.

vote-for5vote-against

You are not nuts to want you or your kids not to have to live through the "horror stories."

vote-for3vote-against

No, I would love to move away from the Philadelphia School District.

vote-for3vote-against

You are not nuts at all. Watch "Waiting for Superman" and you'll feel totally justified in your decision. Good for you for taking charge of your kids lives!

vote-for1vote-against

we live 200 yards from our kids school and next year we will be driving about 5 miles to a private school. I'm tired of hillbilly public education

vote-for5vote-against

@jdcyrus: That process of redistricting takes a while. If it is not on their state schedule to happen by now for 2012, it's not going to happen for another 2-4 years. The government has rules to follow for stuff like that, it's not on a whim. It only seems like it happens on a whim because people don't know when it is considered; they rely on their local news to make them aware of such things (let's not get started on that ball of mess}

vote-for5vote-against

You're not nuts.

I homeschooled for years, but when that was no longer possible, we moved to a small town with a great school system for that reason.

Now I live in a smaller house than I would in another town. But we have incredible services for my child with a learning disability (kids transfer from private schools to get these services) as well as wonderful teachers and programs for my other 2 kids. It's worth it to stay in this this town. And my kids agree.

Good luck in making your decision!

vote-for3vote-against

Did you look at charter schools? I put our 2 daughters to a charter HS with 160 kids only and I couldn't dream of a better school.

vote-for2vote-against

I think you need to do what you think is right for your family. However, just remember that "the grass is not always greener". If you can afford the cost, transfer the children into the school district and pay the out off district tuition rate (if available)for the rest of the school year. Then if things work out, move.

vote-for3vote-against

I think everyone here agrees that it's not nuts to consider it. As always, balance the pros and cons:

Is it more expensive to move or pay for an equivalent private school?

How does this affect your commute? (the extra 15 minutes of driving may actually make getting to work on time impossible, for example)

Will you be moving away from important social contacts?

How will your taxes be different?

That said, there are probably subtle advantages that are corollary: better school districts often are in better neighborhoods and the increased cost of the house may make it a better investment, especially if you can buy while the market is still soft (if you're buying). Better neighborhoods often mean greater safety and less issues with drugs and gangs (I live in LA, it's on my mind).

Good luck with the decision, but you're not crazy to consider it.

vote-for3vote-against

1.5 miles isn't far. That's how far I walked to High School.

vote-for3vote-against

I agree that the school makes a difference, BUT.... here's my story... my son went to one of the lower level school in our county... and I took him for boxing lessons the summer before High School. He increased his self concept and only got picked on once in High School, (didn't even get suspended for breaking the other student's nose because I reported the harassment to the school and they choose to ignore it and it was off of school property) He was a good student but not the best, still he's the one who got a $60,000 scholarship to RPI because he didn't have a lot of competition from lots of better students. He graduated and now lives on Wall St, walks to work, makes as much as I do, and laughs at the insignificance of high school!

My point is that there are many ways to accelerate your child's self confidence, academic abilities and over all life skills besides just living in a better school district. Why not just take music lessons, those children are always scheduled together..

vote-for3vote-against

@havocsback: No, not everyone can or should homeschool. But it is worth considering. I think my homeschooled kids do better without the "socializing" I see others' kids getting in school. Just because they learn at home does not mean they never leave the house. They interact regularly with other kids and adults of all ages, they have co-op classes, sports, choirs, bands, dance, chess clubs, B/G Scouts, and gym too. Just like "normal" kids.

vote-for1vote-against

@bnbsouthworth: I hate the argument that homeschooled kids don't get "socialized". My son goes to public school and my daughter a charter school and I teach in public school. But some of the best students I know are homeschooled. They have been sexualized and they are more innocent but in a good way. I worked with a 15 year old kid for a few hours and we had a great time working together and she had a terrific work ethic too.

vote-for1vote-against

@bnbsouthworth: I know or am related to several families that homeschool or have in the past. Mixed results is the most honest thing I can say.
I don't wish for this to be taken except exactly as it's said: Not everyone can teach, just as not everyone should be a parent, or, for that matter, not everyone who has children IS a parent.

vote-for1vote-against

@mphdavid: (I think you mean socialized -- I had to read it a few times to get your point. Darn autocorrect!) :-)