questionsdo you prefer to write in pencil or pen?

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Pen. My favorite is a Pilot G2 gel pen with an ultra fine tip. Writing seems to be much easier for me with a gel pen. I'd rather pull my gel pen out of my purse to fill out a form than to struggle with a cruddy, skip & blot ball point pen.

I'm just old enough/young enough to have been taught penmanship in elementary school (I think a variation of the Palmer Method with lots of extra loops, swirls, etc.) to get thoroughly messed when when they switched from teaching a slanted cursive to the newer vertical style. My current hand is a very legible cursive-print combo.

My grandmother was a librarian. Every time I ever made notes in my college text book, I felt guilty as hell. Books were to read, not to scribble on the pages.

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I prefer a pen. I always used to press hard when writing and snapped a lot of graphite.

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My answer was going to just be "Yes," but I decided that sounded a bit snarky.

Sometimes I prefer a pencil, especially if I am doing something with math. For note-taking, I prefer a pen. My favorite is the Uni-Ball Vision Elite. A very fine point, but not scratchy. I actually pulled strings to get them special ordered for me at work (it helped that I had control of the paychecks). One of the really nice things about these is that you can get them in blue-black ink. Over the years I have alternated between preferring black ink and blue ink, so this color choice makes both of me happy!

(I'm a sucker for office supplies, for some reason.)

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Pen. I have two.
Black Pilot 78G F nib with black Pilot/Namiki ink cartridges
Charcoal Lamy Safari F nib with some terrible blue/black Monteverde ink cartridges that are too watercolory. Thinking of grabbing the converter for that one and getting some Noodler's blue/black.

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Nothing will ever take the place of the quill.....

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Pen if I'm writing documents. Pencil for puzzles.

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I'm all digital these days...

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@stryker4526: Can't go wrong with Noodler's.

I hate pencils. HATE. My fellow southpaws know what I'm talking about.

I carry two pens. A Montblanc 144 and a Pilot Varsity, both medium nibs. The MB has MB British Racing Green ink, and the Varsity is a disposable with basic black ink. Quick drying, surprisingly.

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Pen, black ink, happy with a Bic Ultra. For my proofreading, much more picky, uni-ball EX2 gel pen, medium, red ink.

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Pen, fine point, has to have a large diameter barrel(arthritis). Plus, I'm a lefty, so focus is important or it gets smeared.
But always ink: everything gets a final answer the first time, and I live with the decision.

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+1 on the MB with racing green. It is all I use at work.I change ink cartridges if black is required for forms. Pencil has to be a Blackwing 602. I break all mechanicals.

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Pencils are for drawing. Pens are for writing.

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@rprebel: I agree re: Noodler's.
I ended up going with Bad Black Moccasin and blue-black. Wanted something permanent and fraud-resistant for checks and legal documents, plus I liked the color better than the standard black.
Decided to do the whole pipette-refill-carts thing, since cartridges hold so much more ink than converters.

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And I love how specific some of these responses are. Makes me feel less crazy for having specific pen/ink preferences.

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Pen for writing and geometric doodles, pencil for sketching.

I had fine handwriting until sometime after 1980. Now my handwriting has totally deteriorated from lack of use. I have to struggle to write so that it might be legible to me a week later, let alone someone else, so I print a lot if if it's just a few words.

I used to be able to write many pages beautifully, long class notes or really long letters. Then I started using a typewriter or keyboard. Now my hand is unused to cursive and starts cramping after a few sentences, and the writing gets less readable paragragh by paragraph.

I am ashamed of this. My dad, who rarely types, has lovely writing.

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Echoing the Lamy Safari (Charcoal, fine nib) and the Noodler's ink (black, cuz colors are dumb). I haven't even had to buy more than the first bottle of ink, and I routinely write notes at work and on the go whenever I think of a good line.

Definitely recommend both of them. It sure beats having a bunch of crummy ballpoints that inevitably get thrown out or chewed on or permanently borrowed by people.

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I have always disliked pencils. They're too... dirty.

I have a few various fountain pens that I use. One is always loaded with either blue/black or black and one is always loaded with something "fun" and "different" - right now it's Orange Crush ( it goes from a light yellow to a dark orange ).

If I'm writing on a really glossy paper that won't take Fountain Pen ink, I usually just use a cheap BIC stick pen.

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I'm surprised I haven't seen a vote for the amazing mechanical pencil - like the best of a pen and pencil combined!
No sharpening required AND it's erasable!

Really though, I loved those back in school with math problems. They're sharper than the regular No. 2 pencil and you can edit easily if you make a mistake.

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Always a pen. Fine or ultra-fine ball point, preferably gel-based ink. It glides across the page, whereas pencils across paper have that unpleasant grating feeling - at least until they dull out a bit after sharpening. I have terrible handwriting and mostly use a computer, so I like to deal with writing instruments as little as possible.

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Erasable pen. 0.38mm

No, not those cruddy Papermate where the ink just smudges around on the paper instead of erasing. Pilot Frixion pens, which (I honestly find this amazingly cool) have ink that turns transparent with high heat!

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Red pen, I usually do a lot of editing.

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I prefer a good sharp pencil because I don't have to worry about the orientation of the instrument. It writes upside down as well as right side up.

As soon as it isn't sharp, though, then I hate a pencil. It feels wrong when it's blunt. A pen is far superior to a rounded-end pencil.

You might suggest mechanical pencils, but they don't cut it because the lead breaks far too easily.

What I really need is a lifetime supply of those expensive astronaut pens. Best of all worlds.

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It depends on what I am doing. Letters, legal stuff , of course ink.
But for personal jottings, as a doodler I prefer pencil. I have a collection of freebie pencils from trips and places and people that bring good memories.
My "Rock 'n Bowl " pencil circa early 1980's SF is a favorite.