questionshow do you deal with insomnia?

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I take a prescription sleeping pill. And then I still lie awake for 2 hours before falling asleep, only to wake up again 3 hours later and toss around half awake the rest of the night. This is my nightly routine.

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Have you tried consulting a physician? There can be many underlying causes to true insomnia, if you're able to pinpoint the cause then it may be easy to correct it. Insomnia can be a very serious medical condition, it leads to overall poor health very quickly, so getting it taken care of right away is probably the best thing to do. Good luck!

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I asked a similar question a while back. There should be some good ideas there.

What's worked for me lately is forcing a schedule and melatonin. The melatonin I take has a couple of other things thrown in there (like GABA and some other stuff I don't remember) and it's worked better for me than just straightforward melatonin. Try and force yourself to be in bed by a certain time and take the pill then. You should be asleep within an hour.

I personally try to avoid things like TV or a book, because I get into it and then I wake up instead of get sleepy. White noise also has helped me. It gives me something to focus on that isn't really focusable (if that makes any sense) and it helps relax my mind.

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This is the particular one I take. It works fairly well. I wouldn't suggest taking it super regularly though, I think I've heard through a not-necessarily-reliable grapevine that it can stop working as well if you take it regularly.

Still, you shouldn't need to. I typically take it in 3 or 4 day runs when I get out of whack. After a few days I'm more or less regulated and don't need it anymore.

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I bought some "Republic Of Tea Get Some Zzz's" tea. It seems to help although I rarely suffer from insomnia.

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I Woot!

Seriously, if I just can't sleep and have millions of things racing through my mind (as I have lately), I occasionally give up, get up, log in, and do some online deal-hunting, starting with my favorite site, Woot!

Addiction is a terrible thing.

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I have a thought about reading to get to sleep. I read that light triggers something in the pineal gland which can trigger waking. Might make more sense to listen to audio books or music - something you can do in the dark.
Just a thought.

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I have been an insomniac all my life. The only thing that helps is total exhaustion. I have tried pills, meditation, exercise, sleep clinics, all to no avail. I do sleep more now than in my 20's, but still only sleeping every other or third day sucks. And that for only about 4 or less hours.

Good luck on finding something that works for you.

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I don't have insomnia per se. I'm just a night person and feel most creative/energized starting around 9PM. This doesn't help when I have to be at work at 8AM every weekday. Some nights I'm up til 1 or 2 doing nothing but just browsing online or watching mindless TV.

To help, I tend to eat right before bed. A full stomach helps me sleep. I wouldn't recommend this to everyone because it's said that eating right before bed leads to a fitful sleep, indigestion and weight gain, but it works for me.

I also like to mess around on my Android phone while lying in bed: browsing new apps, tweaking appearance settings, reading news snippets. I don't know what it is, but I get SUPER sleepy after about 5 minutes of this.

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How do I deal with insomnia? By not sleeping, usually. I didn't sleep a wink last night, or the night before...I've just gotten used to it. My neurologist has prescribed me a number of things over the years, none of which work for more than a few days at a time, if at all.

I'd like to think that suvorexant may be the answer, but it's difficult to get my hopes up. They say it may be on the market as early as next year. It's not like any of the current sleep medications...they developed this one after studying narcolepsy. Basically, it turns off wakefulness rather than trying to dope up the brain to induce sleep.

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I rarely battle insomnia, but warm milk helps me when necessary.

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1. Before you go to bed, write down ON PAPER all the little things that are bugging you and/or you have to do the next day.
2. Exercise (earlier in the day.)
3. Drink LOTS of plain water throughout the day....but not for 2-3 hrs before bedtime.
4. No caffeine after 2pm.
5. No cell phones, TVs, etc. on in the bedroom for 1 hr before you plan to sleep.
6. Change your bedside table lamp from regular to orange (not yellow or white) and make sure that's the only light on for 1 hr before bedtime.
7. Take a hot bath/shower, then cool down the bedroom.
8. Take a calcium + magnesium supplement (add melatonin and/or valerian root if you want to) as you get into bed.....and get VERY STILL. Force yourself to be still.
9. Listen to this (specific) CD: http://www.amazon.com/Your-Present-Half-Hour-Meditation-Spiritual/dp/096507241X
10. If that doesn't work, Ambien or Lunesta, etc.---but only on occasion.
(These suggestions are assuming that your Dr. has ruled out medical causes.)

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Also.....

Pet your dog or cat for at least 15 minutes. Unless you hate dogs/cats or are very allergic, it will lower your blood pressure and your heart rate. They also make great listeners. Unburden yourself onto them. I've never had any of my pets tell anybody any of my secrets.....ever. :-)

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@reginafilangee: Unfortunately, if I wake up long enough, the cat just wants to play immediately. She's still young though, maybe that trick will work when she's older. :)

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There are two things to sort out here.

1) Is this a symptom of real, treatable mental illness? If so, then getting that addressed with therapy and medication is the way to go.

2) If not (or even if it is) then good sleep hygiene is very helpful. Clinical studies indicate is is as good as medications like zolpidem (Ambien) and the like. Go to bed at the same time. Wake up at the same time. Do NOT lie awake in bed (it sounds like what you are doing). Do not read, watch TV, woot, or otherwise hang in bed. Bed is for sleeping and, ah, well, go ask @ocheri, she'll explain what else. If you don't fall asleep in a relatively short period of time (15 minutes) get up, go do something, then try again.