questionsdo you have to pay part of your premium for…

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vote-for8vote-against

yes. i pay about $70/month. it'd be nice if my employer picked up the entire tab, but i work at a small business (<30 people) and it's really not possible.

vote-for8vote-against

Yes and we have been for the entire time we've been working. Do you work for a government or quasi-government entity? They are about the only ones out there with a traditional benefits package any more.
Typically we have paid about 30-40% of the total premium, depending on the employer.

vote-for4vote-against

Yes, we pay 20% of our premium and the company pays 80% regardless of which plan you are on (we offer 3) and regardless of whether you are single/married/have kids/etc. I've worked here 15 years and it's been the same split the whole time.

vote-for4vote-against

We pay 19%, up from 18% last year. My cheapest option for individual insurance costs about $115 per month, plus another $14 tax for having a "cadillac plan".

vote-for7vote-against

I get mine paid for but I have to pay for my wife and son's premiums. But, mine is a high deductible plan so I get absolutely nothing out of it unless I spend like $6K first. It is complete BS and it is just going to get a lot worse!

vote-for4vote-against

Yes, $460 a year for the family. Looks like that is going up though over the next 5 years.

Mine is driven by Congress - as an AF retiree.

vote-for3vote-against

Employees pay 40% at my company. Have 2 different options and both are a 60/40 company/employee split.

vote-for3vote-against

At my company, the split is 20% EE/80% ER for the employee, and 80% EE/20% ER for any additional people on the plan. So it's good if you're single, otherwise it is $$$.

vote-for4vote-against

Being self-employed we pay the entire bill for our health insurance, about $350 for the two of us. When I had a job my employer paid 100% and my husband was union so they also paid 100% but I think the days of employer contributions (to anything!) will be ending soon.

vote-for3vote-against

At the company I am currently at, they pay the health premium for the employee. However, only medical insurance is covered, and family the employee has to pay. For me that is about $45 month for add, lt disability, life, and dental for me and my daughter. If I added my daughter to my health plan it would cost me an additional $95 a week. While it is very good insurance, who can afford $425 a month?

vote-for5vote-against

Think about this: Even if your employer pays for all of your coverage, you're really still paying for it in the form of a lower salary, aren't you? That's one of the trade-offs for many government jobs, basically that the base salary is lower than public-sector jobs, but the benefits packages are better. So it all balances out in the end.

vote-for3vote-against

I think I'm going to blow everyone away here. I live in Southern California and work for a medical technology firm.

My share of the medical and dental insurance for my family of four, the amount taken out of each bi-monthly paycheck, is $583. My employer's contribution is $317, or 35%. The total combined cost for our insurance is $21,600 annually, of which I will pay right around $14,000.

Now I have voluntarily chosen the most expensive plan my company offers because my son is quite sick. I could have taken a less expensive plan with higher co-pays and deductibles, but we will actually save more money with the more expensive plan.

vote-for5vote-against

I work for local government and I have always paid for a portion of my healthcare. I can't recall exactly how much, I have direct deposit and don't ever see my pay stub. We have three levels of benefit plan to choose from. I am planning to retire in a couple of years so I switched to the cheapest plan with a ridiculous deductible (I am in good health and rarely use my insurance) for my last few years because it included an option for a Health Savings Account. This is a savings plan that I can contribute up to something like $250 a month pre-tax, and as long as I use the money to pay for either health care or, after I retire, health insurance premiums, I never have to pay tax on it. It sounded like an awesome deal to me, so I am contributing the maximum amount to it until I retire, with the plan to use it to help pay for insurance.

vote-for7vote-against

Yes. I think plans where the employer pays 100% of the cost are quite rare these days. From 2004 to 2006, my prior employer did offer such a plan, but then in 2007 they changed both the cost structure and the coverage model, requiring employee contributions as well as increased co-pays and deductibles. So don't feel like you're being singled out, your employer was just one of the very last to abandon that model.

vote-for3vote-against

I believe that paying for at least a portion of your health plan yourself is an important part of controlling health care costs. The vast majority of people won't care about health care costs until it affects them directly and obviously.

My wife is a state employee, and we pay a large portion of the premium for our family of 5, and have for years.

vote-for3vote-against

It's pretty rare for an employer to pay 100%.

My employer (online retail) pays 80%, my guy works for a non-profit and they pay 75%.

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I'm in an international missionary group plan. My ministry account pays 100% of my premium ($366/month), but I have to pay self-employment tax on that amount since it is a taxable benefit. That works out to about $57/month.

vote-for3vote-against

I am eligible for nine of the health plans offered by NY City. The current (as of July 2012) rates are here, if you are curious.

I have a family plan with Aetna HMO and now pay $288.94 biweekly (my Rx are covered by my union's welfare fund, not the NYC plan). The year ending June 2012, I was paying just under $257 (biweekly), so the most recent increase was about 12.6%.

I can (vaguely) recall when it was about $30 biweekly, many many moons ago.

Note that some of the plans (GHI, for example) have no up-front cost, though they tend to have higher costs when you actually visit a doctor and much higher costs should you need a hospital stay. (My last hospital stay, for six days in 2008, cost me $100. Had I had the phone and TV turned on (instead of just the TV), I would have spent more on the TV and phone than on the entire hospital visit.)

vote-for3vote-against

My insurance(BCBS) is taken out of my salary. The deductible is currently at $2500 IIRC. Come on, isn't there a better way out there? However, I am thankful to be employed and have insurance.

vote-for4vote-against

Count your blessings, I pay 100%, my deductible is 5k. I've made 0 claims in ten years. Insurance companies love people like me that's why they keep raising my rates.

vote-for4vote-against

@xdavex: Can I make a suggestion? Please go get a full, complete physical. Even if you have a high deductible, check your policy to see how much coverage is offered for annual physicals.

I work in healthcare and I can't tell you how many times I've seen claims usage go from zero to astronomical because people don't bother with preventive medicine. Then out of nowhere something like a breast lump is discovered months or years too late instead of being caught early when it's easier, safer and less expensive to treat.

It's a myth that insurance companies don't want to pay claims. They actually love to see members getting preventive and proactive care. That's the classic win/win situation, and also why there is a strong emphasis on preventive care in the Affordable Care Act.

vote-for5vote-against

Holy cow, I had no idea there were still places that fully paid for health insurance. Yes, I've been paying part for the past 17 years.

vote-for4vote-against

I pay $11 a month for individual health insurance. I work for a hospital/healthcare system. We have to get care through our own network first, and go through an extra referral process for anything not affiliated with my employer. Otherwise, I could be paying $110 a month. They don't tell us how much the company contributes. I consider our plans to be quite affordable.

vote-for3vote-against

My wife, who is a teacher, pays for a family of four $885 a month - sucks...

vote-for3vote-against

@jsimsace: Don't cry. I am paying something like $100 a month for a plan with a $5,000 annual deductible and after that 100% coverage. We get a free annual physical (including gender specific annual exams) and an RX discount card. We also have a Wellness Center 2 days a week we can visit for free that can handles sprains and sniffles. But anything more serious than that and I have to pay for it directly. It's the cheapest plan offered by my employer, and its intended for healthy people like me who rarely use insurance, and for seriously ill people for whom $5k up front and 100% coverage after that is a better deal than a $300 a month plan with a $1000 deductible and 80% coverage. A lot of us are so healthy that we tend to neglect our annual exams, so my employer is now giving us a $100 a year bonus if we complete all our annual wellness exams, which are free under all the various options.

vote-for3vote-against

Yep, I have about $80 a month taken out of my paychecks.