questionscan you drive an manual transmission car?

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My first vehicle purchase was a standard. I learned to drive a standard from previously owning a couple of motorcycles....the concept is the same but applied a little differently.

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My dad taught me on his car about a year after I got my license, and has given me periodic refreshers ever since. He only takes me out on back roads though, after I stalled at a highway green light my first time out.
I feel like since he did that, I could manage to get home if I ever had to drive one unexpectedly.

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I learned to drive on a standard transmission. Not certain if that's the best way to learn or not, but it's what my family had that Dad was willing to let us learn on. It took a while to get the hang of it but after I did I've been very confident driving anything.
My current car is a standard transmission. When I was shopping for new cars a few years ago it took me a bit to convince the dealerships that I actually wanted a standard (I'm a girl. I look young for my age. I live in Texas. I wasn't buying a truck.). When I actually I had to wait a few weeks for the dealership to find me one with the other options I wanted. But it saved me some money and I actually enjoy driving with a manual transmission.

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I was taught on both an automatic and a manual. I now own a manual. I find it to be more fun to drive.

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Yep, my dad taught me when I was a kid. Came in pretty handy when we moved to Germany and the only rentals available were standard transmission. That would not have been a fun month if I hadn't already known how to drive one.

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I can drive one but I choose not to, since most of my driving is commuting in the Dallas area.

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When I learned to drive (early '80s) manuals were a lot more common than they are today; our two family cars were manuals so that's what I learned to drive. (The school's Drivers' Ed simulators and car were automatic, so I got practice on those too.) Learning on a manual means you have the full driving skill-set; you can just let some of it go when you want to drive an automatic. Learning on an automatic means you need to pick up the rest of the skill set if you want to drive the other kind. IMO the first scenario is far preferable.

Nowadays though, manuals are mostly found only on utility and performance vehicles. It's perfectly possible to go through life never needing to drive a stick. The zeits, they are a-geisting.

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My first vehicle was a 1970 Chevy pickup with a 3-speed column shifter. I drove a series of manual cars until my first automatic in 1997. To be honest, I have never watned to go back to manual since.

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I learned in a manual ('76 Ford Courier); I had a manual Toyota truck for many years; I bought a manual 5-door Focus last year.

It's easy, and it's fun. With an automatic, you have the Man sitting with you all the time telling you when you should shift.

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I just learned this summer. I felt very ashamed being a 26 year old male driver that wasn't able to drive stick. It was time to just learn :)

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I can drive one, learned on a manual but now have autos. Nothing like trying to exist in California traffic jams with a manual. Ugh!

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@fenriq: Try driving through Daytona during Speedweeks in a manual truck. My left calf was cramped for days!

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I've been able to drive a manual since the late 70s when I first learned. I'd rather drive a manual - much more fun, even my old 97 F-150 was a manual.

My father-in-law believes that everyone should be required to earn their driver license with a manual - if you can't handle one you shouldn't be driving.

I tend to agree.

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I learned to drive first on a tractor with a bush hog on the back, and then on the road with a 5 speed Jeep. The only vehicles I've ever owned that were automatic were pickups.

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I still had my learner’s permit, but had been driving for a couple months, and my dad took me out to drive the back roads in his pickup. I still vividly remember killing it multiple times at a stop sign and having to signal for the person behind me to go around. Ah, great memories.

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I initially learned on an automatic, but learned to shift on my girlfriend's father's Audi wagon.

Since then I've driven both automatics and manuals: I had two manual cars in a row (Mazda MX-6 GT and a Miata) then automatics since.

I'll be buying another small econobox sometime in the next year: it may be automatic or manual. I hear that the better mileage that used to be associate with manuals isn't there any more. Still, I'm glad I know how. Bet I can still start a manual on a steep hill without burning out the clutch.

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Yes and I miss it, I feel like you have more control over the car. It can be quite inconvenient in traffic though. I do think everyone should know how to drive one.

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Yup, I strive a stick. :-)

There was a story in my local paper about a couple of car thieves who were going to steal this guy's car. They put a gun on him and demanded his keys but when they found the car was a manual, they decided to steal a nearby Camry instead.

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Absolutely. My three year older sister taught me to drive in her 1981 Honda Civic hatchback. I've had a couple of manual transmission cars and a couple of automatics since then. Never seem to forget.

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Yep! I learned on "The Honkey Tonk" a gigantic 1985 For F-150 extended cab. HATED learning how to drive in it, but ended up loving to drive it.

I would drive manual now if I was not in so much lovely southern California traffic!

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Here in the midwest, Driver's Ed is conducted on farm implements. Of course the donkey is an automatic, but gas and mileage are unrelated.

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Initially learned on an automatic. About three years later i started working in the service department at a car dealer. Pretty much taught myself to drive a stick moving Corvettes, Camaro SS's, and Chevelle SS's around the lot and the shop. That was fun!
Every car I've bought for myself since then has been manual transmission. The only automatic was my wife's car (when married), but she could drive stick also.

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Yes I can! Both my daily driver and my weekend wagon are stick shift. And I live in SoCal with a 20 mile commute that usually takes 45 minutes each way.

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i learned to drive a stick in a '91 Firebird.
The gearbox was tighter than a Jeep.
You cant simulate the feeling of dropping into 2nd and rounding a corner.

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I learned how to drive with a standard ( '78 Ford Pinto) in the 80's. I drove standards until last year when my husband bought me an automatic. I love my car, but HATE driving it, so he does. I now have a chauffeur. Yeah!!!

I also made my daughter learn to drive a standard, and when she did, we bought her one. My reason for this is so she could drive whatever if she needed to get out of a bad situation. She loves it and has taught 2 of her friends to drive it.

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Okay, I'll face my embarrassment and be the first poster to admit that I never learned.

@jha1223: I first read that as "my three year old sister" and pictured your sister teaching you to drive stick in one of those red plastic Little Tikes cars! :)

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Yes. I wasn't a fan at first, but now I love it. Sometimes I wish Io had one, but am glad I don't most of the time.

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@neuropsychosocial: Thought I was gonna be the first but you beat me.

Never learned to drive a stick, but then again my family hasn't even owned a manual-transmission vehicle (within my memory)

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@neuropsychosocial: I read my post after I typed it and decided it should be left as is :)

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Like a boss! I learned to drive auto in a '64 Chrysler New Yorker and stick in a '62 Beetle with bits of the floorboards missing. The Beetle used to shimmy in 1st & 2nd especially on cold days.
As far as my Dad was concerned, once I was able to stop at a traffic light on a steep hill, not stall, and could work that magic combination of the stick, clutch, emergency hand brake and gas pedal to be able to move forward when the light turned green (and NOT roll backward), his work was done.

I drive a V-8 automatic these days. WAY too many traffic lights where I live. Traffic lights & high heels are rough on the floor mats, not to mention a clutch.

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@jha1223: Thank you for leaving your post as-is, because I really enjoyed the mental image. I was very fond of my Little Tikes car back in the day and I love the idea of an older sibling teaching the younger to "drive" it! :)

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My daily driver until a few months back was a stick. I still find myself feeling a bit uncomfortable driving an automatic after driving a stick daily for most of my driving life but for a living in a major city it just made more sense at this point. I still "air clutch" starting once a week.

I made the switch as a college student when a friend offered to sell me their used car cheap. I found it followed this path...for the first 3-4 months it was a fun toy to drive. After 3-4 months I hated driving short rides because of the damn shifting as a novelty wore off and the traffic and stop signs/lights won over. Then one day I realized I was shifting without thinking just off of feel/sound of car and it was effortless. I then had to drive an auto for the first time in around a year and felt completely uncomfortable and almost out of control because of the lack of shifting.

Hopefully at some point I can afford a "toy" and pickup a weekend car that is a manual because I miss it.

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I drive one now (Mustang GT) and taught myself to drive the day I bought my 1967 MGB GT. Didn't too too badly except for reverse...I pulled into a driveway with the intention of turning around but couldn't find reverse so I drove across their lawn and out the neighbor's driveway. Later I found a friend with more experience and he taught me to drive it properly.

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Yes, one of my brothers showed me and when I took drivers ed, we had simulator time using a manual shift but none actual. My first car was a manual shift.

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Yes... Learned at the age of 14 driving an old 63 Chevy pick-up truck at my summer job... :-) 3 on the tree was fun...
Currently own 2 standard transmission vehicles one of which is a Miata set up for Autocross in Stock Class and owned many MGBs while in college..
@ohcheri: 67 MGBGT had no synchro from 1st to 2nd gear and no emissions control junk on it... Lots of torque in the low end... I miss my MGs but the Miata is close...

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@joewaters: Ha ha, I was driving a John Deere before a car.

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@mtm2: If it was San Jose 1978...yep, that was me!

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@hobbitss: I loved that MG but didn't have it for long, some folks in a station wagon plowed into me and totaled it about 6 months after I bought it :-(

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I had 10 minutes to get to work. I said "Hey dad, can you take me to work? My car's in the shop."

Dad said "Take my car."

"I can't, your car is a stick and I can't drive a stick"

Dad smiled and said "What time do you have to be there?"

"In 10 minutes."

Dad laughed and handed me the keys and said "Well, you've got 10 minutes to figure it out!"

I never killed it and I learned something that I think everyone should learn. I think it makes you a better driver and gives you more control of the vehicle.

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I can drive a manual but with the newer automatic transmission getting BETTER mileage than manuals these days there's really no point.

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Nope! Tried once and couldn't get it out of the parking lot! ;-> Besides, I only have 2 feet! One for the gas, and one for the brake! Yes, that is how I really drive!

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I've always driven manuals - right up to my current 5-speed Accord. Rentals are always automatic, though. When I rent cars I'm always looking for the clutch & slamming on the brake.

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Love 'em, got one (Jeep), want a 6 speed someday....

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My dad tried to teach me in a late 80's F150 Super cab with an extra long bed. It was a boat. I did ok once I got the thing moving, but I spun out every time I tried to get it into first. His goal was to make sure that I could drive a stick in an emergency, so he was satisfied.

Many years later, I fell in love with the MINI Cooper S and had to have one. They were only available in a 6-speed manual, so I had to learn. I put in my order, and my wonderful co-worker volunteered to teach me. I will always be grateful to him, and I hope my car-nut dad is looking down from heaven with approval as I've tooled around in my little yellow MINI for the past 9 years.

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Learned on a manual 50 years ago. Probably could drive one again if forced to.

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The driver's ed course I took required you do like a little sample in the parking lot. I thought it was cool, so I booked three of my five hours in the standard car and learned. When I went to buy my first car a few months later I looked specifically for one in standard. All of my cars since have been as well. Recently when I was car shopping I had a salesman get really frustrated with me because every car he thought I would like wasnt standard and I refused to look at anything that wasnt. I wound up going to a different dealership, then eventually resorted to shopping online until I found cars that I liked that were in standard. It was a little more difficult, but totally worth it. Plus, standard cars dont sell quite as well so there is normally a little more negotiating room.