questionsdo you let your kid(s) swear/cuss/curse/use…

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i don't have any kids, but my dog swears like a drunken sailor.

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It depends on if you want your child to grow up to be a vulgar, profane disrespectful, inconsiderate adult with no dignity or self respect. Some parents are (obviously) ok with their kids being rotten human beings but hopefully most parents prefer the opposite.

vote-for6vote-against

My kid was a drunken sailor...we had to cover the dog's ears.

No we never ALLOWED them to curse as children, but there were always those "from the mouths of babes" gems that make every parent cringe.

vote-for13vote-against

No. If they grow up and choose to, then that's their decision. But if they're under my roof, then they abide by my rules.

It seems only fair that I also have to watch my mouth in front of them, which isn't always easy.

vote-for4vote-against

Short answer: No. Elaboration: Long, long ago when my children were young, they were not allowed to use profanity. My 12 year old son came to me to tell me that his sister, age 5, had said a bad word. Asked him what word. He replied that he couldn't say it - not allowed. Finally got him to say it was the word beginning w/F. :-/

Sat my daughter down & explained that curse words were not allowed and why. The 'why' was not preachy, per se... just that children do not understand how those words can negatively affect other people, and are not old enough to decide if they want to accept the consequences. An aside: Daughter repeated the word that her 5 yo female playmate said. ::sigh::

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u betcha! i'm especially proud when he uses the F-bomb in a sentence and really means it! not just throwing it around but USING it! of course then there are all the others - some of my proudest moments!!

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It's only fair that I let 'em, considering I keep telling them to go the f--- to sleep.

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@ohcheri: Because using profanity automatically makes you a inconsiderate rotten human being?

Uh, Mittens to that.

wedit

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@ohcheri you are a Penguin. People using "vulgar" language does not make them rotten human beings, or any less of a human than one that does not use such language. I don't see a problem with a child using such language so long that it is not in a negative way towards anyone. It is your type of intolerance that makes 90 percent of the world ignorant. It is a matter of respect to not direct this type of language towards other people. If you instill that in your child they will be fine. If you cannot raise your child to know the difference between the usage of such words and fudge, shemear, wakka wakka ding dong, etc. then you are probably not good at parenting. I am a parent and I will allow my son to speak freely; so long as it is not disrespectful. He will also be raised to look down on ignorant and intolerant beestings.

wedit

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@ajax1285: really??? you had to go there?? you are just enforcing the belief...and i'm all for a good cuss word but that was just rude dude

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@gretchena: Someone had to. Vulgar language is part of our culture. It has been around for thousands of years. Some people don't agree with it, and that is fine. However it should not inhibit other from using it. I was making a point, and that point was made. Maybe I should have phrased it "Are you a shoe shining idiot?" so that it was more of an inquisition, rather than a direct statement.

wedit

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My son does not yet speak but I will certainly discourage that type of language while he is young. He does like to grab women in inappropriate places. Just yesterday I had to tell him "you are only going to be able to get away with that for a little while longer."

I do agree with @ajax1285's point but the personal attack on @ocheri was definitely not needed.

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this is getting [bleep] juicy

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@daviscmd: @ajax1285 The question was "Do you allow your children to curse?" Not "Do you think everyone who curses is a rotten human being?" Since you couldn't be bothered to read the question I'm not surprised you're so indignant by my answer.

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FYI - i was being a smartass with my answer - DUH!

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@ajax1285: no...no i don't think anybody had to go THERE - if that's the best you can come up with to defend your stance then maybe ocheri is right after all - just sayin'

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@ohcheri: Fail again sir.

I did read the question, and I don't dissagree with your general opinion that your probably shouldn't let young kids swear like sailors... However, you proceded to call ALL people that use profanity as indecent rotten human beings (before your edit) - full disregard for the original question, thus the downvote and reply.

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@ohcheri: I did read the question; and had you read my response correctly, you would have seen the answer mid-statement. I will allow my son to curse, but instill in him the different between using such language in a derogatory manner, and making a statement. In your answer you were the one that felt the need to make a statement that all people who use such language are "rotten human beings." Therefore you answered the question, in question, incorrectly. LMFAO (Since there seem to be few adults here that do not get offended I used a form of shorthand that I feel is murdering the English language.) @gretchena: If you had read my full statement you may have seen that I was using vulgar language to different extents to make a point. Let me break it down "You are a (example) idiot." Directly= bad. "Usage of such words as (fine examples here) damn, etc." general statement = good; or at least acceptable among some. My aim was not to offend, but educate.

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This is a difficult question. I feel that I should start by saying that I do not have any kids, yet (my wife and I are fixing health issues before we start trying).

This is sort of a two part question. You have your children who are too young to know what the words mean, and just repeat what they hear. And you have the teen-ish age that are more capable of understanding what the words mean.

For your children who are two young, though I find it very humorous when they swear, I will do my best to educate them about why those types of words aren't appropriate. Granted, they are young, so they may not fully understand, but I'd like to at least set the ground rules.

As they get older and are able to comprehend what they are actually saying... this is difficult. If you tell a teen not to do something, often, they strive to do the opposite. So, instead of telling them NOT to, I'd continue doing my best to educate they about why it's not appropriate.

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I teach my kids that curse words are just words, and the only thing determining their vulgarity is societal convention. After all, other than the word itself, what's the difference between sh** and poop. So, no I don't let then curse, but it's not because of the words themselves, but for proper integration into polite society.
Side note: Who here thinks "scum" or "scumbag" is a perfectly acceptable term of derision for kids to use?
http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=scumbag&allowed_in_frame=0

j5 j5
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@daviscmd: A)I'm not a sir and B)I curse with the best of drunken sailors and do not consider myself a rotten human being.

The scenario in the original question: Two adults playing a video game with a 12 year old boy and the parent of this boy is swearing and allowing his child to swear in the presence of another adult. This is rude and disrespectful. When a child is treated as a peer the lines between what is acceptable for an adult and what is acceptable for a child are blurred and confusing for the child.

When I hear a stranger cuss in public I immediately view that person as having no class, same as I view the teenagers who walk down the street, cursing and spitting with their butts hanging out the back of their pants. Their parents taught them no manners, no respect and even if they are not rotten humans, they are cleverly disguised as such.

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@ohcheri: I love how you are consciously hypocritical... You state that people that use vulgar language are rotten people; Then post that you use vulgar language like a drunken sailor, but do not consider yourself a rotten person. This is what is wrong with society today; Intolerance and hypocrisy. You should run for office SIR!

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@ajax1285: Once again, you did not read my answer to the question.

Question: Do you allow your children to curse?

Answer: Only if you want them to be rotten humans.

If you can don't raise your children to be respectful of others they are very likely growing up to be rotten humans. I never said an adult shouldn't swear.

You seem awfully defensive about this subject, sorry if I touched a raw nerve.

vote-for1vote-against

Too funny. You can let your kids use some low level curse words and they will still be respectful.

Come on, we were all kids once. What we said at home was NOT what we said at school or hanging around with our buddies. Learning to curse was a rite of passage. Did we all become heathens because of it or disrespectful? LOL

I allow my 13 yr old son to use low level words like damn at home only. It is not a stepping stone word on the way to the F bomb. Also, he appreciates that I am not a hypocrite which in turn, makes him respect me and my decisions more.

He is very respectful, but what we do in the privacy of our own home is our own business. He understands what a public and private persona are.

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@ohcheri: No nerves touched. I just enjoy a good debate, and this is a good topic. I will agree that if you do not raise your children to respect others, they may very well grow up to be rotten humans. I just don't think that vulgar language makes people rotten humans. :)

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@dreamyvelvet: I completely agree with your answer.

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I can swear with the best of them and have and continue to do so. I do, however, have an excellent vocabulary and knowledge of proper use of the English language. I think the foregoing to essential in bringing up children. When they mature to an age where they have all of the social graces and the knowledge of proper behavior in all sorts of circumstances, then and only then would I say it is OK to express oneself with vulgarity and the dams, hells, etc. It is only a step from one benign word to something inappropriate and then it becomes a habit, oh so easily.

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@ohcheri: A) Ms., sorry no foul intent with "Sir" just an uneducated assumption.

B) Your reply fails to highlight the fact that you edited (and therefore changed the meaning of) your original response to the thread question. Had you originally posted what it reads right now, I never would have replied - because as I already stated I agree with your general position that your probably shouldn't let your young kids swear.

The original post stated that you thought ALL people that used profanity were rotten human beings. Maybe you made a typo in your sentence structure? But please don't make me look like fool by refusing to acknowledge this important point.

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@daviscmd: I posted my reply 5 hours ago and your response was 4 hours ago. The system only allows a minute or two to edit (I know someone will correct me on this) but definitely not an hour. Perhaps you read it incorrectly the first time? I understand people tend to skim when reading so it's completely understandable that what you thought you read was not what I wrote.

Basically I'm saying that the type of parent who allows their 12 year old son to curse in front of a guest is likely to be the same type of parent who has unclear boundaries in other areas.

@dreamyvelvet says that saying damn is not a stepping stone to the f-bomb...possibly not but where do you draw the line? Can he say damn when his grandparents are visiting? In the grocery store? Treating children differently than adults is not hypocrisy, it's common sense. Drinking alcohol is an adults only activity, so is smoking and having sex. It's not hypocritical to tell your child they can't behave as an adult.

vote-for5vote-against

Yes and no. We think it's probably unrealistic to expect no worse than "aw shucks!" if someone bangs their toe, is dealing with real frustration, etc. So we try to direct expressions of frustration and such into moderate terms like maybe "crap" or "oh poop!" rather than the litany of bad ones.

vote-for3vote-against

I do not find vulgar words to be any more offensive than their 'clean' synonyms. I never really understood how it was decided that "I need to s--t" is somehow worse than "I need to poop."

However, I understand that some people truly feel offended and disrespected when cuss words are used in their presence. For this reason, my children are not allowed to use them. I want them to have respect for other people, and right now they're too young to understand how a word might offend someone.