questionsdo you use non-oem compatible ink cartridges?

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Haven't had success with Canon or HP non-OEM carts. Even tried the ink refill stuff once...wasn't worth the effort.

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@mtm2: I might have considered it for my older printer but people are saying their printer doesn't recognize the cartridge. The price difference is staggering though. I just found black on sale so got a XXL cartridge and I'll set up to it doesn't print colors to save on the color cartridges.

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@minkeygirl7: At the office and home I use XL or XXL (as appropriate). Just haven't had success with the other cartridges.

I'm sure some of them work fine...just not been our experience.

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I get some for my Cannon from SophiaGlobal on Amazon. Works great, but I don't do much printing nor do I worry about quality too much.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/browse.html?ie=UTF8&marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&me=A2WM1AK3D6WQ63

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@mtm2: Office Max has the XXL black on sale for $26.24 and free shipping. That's a great price.

@bssmith1. People are saying a lot of the compatibles aren't recognized by the computer. I don't care at all about quality really, I just don't want to have to screw around with stuff that doesn't work. Just read reviews, seem favorable so I'll keep that in mind for sure. thanks

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I have a Canon wireless printer and I've never bought the "official" cartridges! Got the non-OEM ones and then used an ink refill kit. No problems so far. :)

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Not any more. We had a very nice Canon several years ago; killed it when I tried a refilled cartridge instead of OEM. Replacing/repairing the print head wasn't an option.

The HP model we have has fairly expensive cartridges, but I pay for OEM rather than risk another dead printer.

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My epson carts use chips as well, and I never have an issue with off-brand refilled generics.

Note that if it's a printer that uses high-quality pigment based inks, the non-oem replacements are usually dye-based. this should only matter if you're printing photographs that you want to last more than a few years. Dye based inks typically aren't as vivid, fade fairly quickly, but they are cheaper.

edit: I get my ink carts from supermediastore.com. They usually have great deals and free shipping codes. You can also go to eBay and get an ink-cartridge resetter that that programs the chips to show "full" to the printer, and can stretch your name-brand cartridges a lot longer that way. I've noticed that my particular Epson brand cartridges typically tell the printer they're empty when they still have 15-20% of their ink left.

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I have a 5 year old Brother MFC 240c and only bought Brother carts once at Staples.

Since then I have made all the other purchases from the mothership at a fraction of the cost and never had a problem with them.

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@kamikazeken: How do I know what kind of ink they use? I don't care that much for general printing and copying but it would be nice if photos don't fade.

This is my first printer with chips so it's a new world for me. I'm not all that confident about messing around with resetting chips. Maybe once I see how much ink I go through I'll change my mind.

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@kamikazeken: Do you know of any that use pigment-based inks for Kodak printers? I prefer using the real thing, but Kodak recently stopped making the printers - who knows how long ink will be available.

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when i was running a CIS (continuous ink system) - the only way to get the highest quality output was to make sure i was going with german inks. the made in china carts would always have color density and accuracy problems for me. this was on a chipped canon.

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I've never had a problem with cartridges refilled at Costco.

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I used OEM cartridges in my Canon printer until its warranty ran out. I've been buying Blake Printing Supply cartridges from Amazon; much cheaper and no problems yet.

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Can someone explain "chipped" cartridges and what that means re: cartridges? Thanks

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@minkeygirl7: Sure,
The cartridge has a microchip in cartridge to tell the printer to stop printing uses X amount of ink. X amount is about 1.3 - 1.5 times as much ink as a cartridge contains.
This is makes you buy new OEM cartridges, that protect p̶r̶o̶f̶i̶t̶s̶ ̶o̶f̶ ̶t̶h̶e̶ ̶p̶r̶i̶n̶t̶e̶r̶ ̶m̶a̶k̶e̶r̶ the consumer from subpar printing.

When buying a printer I look at the refill procedure and will not buy a printer unless the refill is easy.

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@caffeine_dude: Ok I got that. Thanks So what are people saying when they talk about resetting the chip so the printer thinks it's full?

I'm all about money. The printer I got was 1/2 off. I don't print all that much and I was able to find OEM cartridges on ebay for my last Canon printer. Now, there are none that I saw.

This printer will still print if one of the cartridges is empty unlike other manufacturers.

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I have a Canon - had no problems taking the chips off the old cartridges and putting in on cheap compatible ones. Eventually I bought a cheap chip resetter to mark them as full again so I could have a better idea what the levels were. Lately though I found compatible cartridges that came with chips for only a little more than the no-chip ones and they've been great.

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I've been using non-OEM HP inks (74 XL & 75 XL in particular) for the past two years now.

I've save around more than 50% (Retail: $30 / eBay: $5) for pretty much the same usage.

There are a few downsides though, which you may or may not mind.

1) Most likely unable to view ink levels (my case), so when it runs out of a color.. you're gonna get some weird looking colored prints.
2) Cartridge quality may vary from seller to seller and batch to batch. I've been using different sellers from eBay, and there are some cartridges that work and there are some that either malfunction or run out of ink faster than you can say butterscotch. So far the ratio of having a "bad egg" is about 1:4 with generic cartridges. I would read user reviews of the seller before buying.

Noticeable difference in color quality? Hardly any.

I have three pairs of cartridges ready with me for a rainy day.

I haven't done any cartridge refills by myself (except for this one time..which was messy) or by someone else.

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@prosperouscheat: I guess when I get them I'll take a look and figure it out. The printer hasn't even shipped yet.

Where are you getting the ones you like?

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@minkeygirl7: Got them from a seller on Amazon but it's been so long it doesn't look like they're active any more. I've also bought from 77ink.com - those were chipless but the ink was good and they do sell ones with chips too. Again though, that was ages ago - not sure what the quality is like now.

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@prosperouscheat: Can I use chip less interchangeably? Or do I have to put chips in them? This is all new to me.

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@minkeygirl7: The printer won't work without the chip being there so you can carefully take the chip off the old cartridge and put it on the new one then either
- override the settings on your printer so it will print even though it thinks the ink is empty
or
- but a chip resetter which will reset the chip to show the ink is full again.
I'm sure there are probably youtube videos around that demonstrate.
If that all sounds like too much hassle then stick with ones that come with the chip. They're still a lot cheaper than genuine Canon.

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@prosperouscheat: Thanks for explaining. Way too much of a hassle. Chips it is!