questionswhere is a good place to purchase a windows 7…

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All depends on what you use the computer for. 4 Gigs of RAM is enough if you plan on using the computer to browse the internet, check your email, and create word documents.

If you plan on using the latest games, you may want to think about upgraded hardware.

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@cengland0: Flash from the past: your comment reminded me of how excited I was back in the mid-90's when I could finally upgrade to 4mg RAM (at a painful $100/mg).

My, how times have changed!

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@magic cave: My first computer, purchased in 1982, only had 16K of ram and I was so excited when I could finally afford to upgrade it to 48K using cheap 3rd party RAM chips. 8K x 1 bit each for a total of 32 chips I had to insert on the motherboard. Those were the days.

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@cengland0: Not much of a gamer, but I do occasionally use it to edit home videos.

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@fleamarketadict: Video editing is a complicated thing to calculate how much memory you really need. It will probably still work with minimal RAM but could take forever to render your final video. It's also important to have the correct processor if speed is important.

I use a Mac Pro 12 core with 24 gigs of RAM for my video editing but you could get away with an i5 with 8GB. This is the minimum recommended system for video editing according to videoguys.

http://www.videoguys.com/Guide/E/Videoguys+System+recommendations+for+Video+Editing/0x4aebb06ba071d2b6a2cd784ce243a6c6.aspx

When compressing video to fit on a DVD, I have noticed a huge improvement going to an i7 processor versus any other chip (including the Xeon). Seems Intel put some hardware in the 4th generation i7 specifically for video editing/compression. That makes more of a difference than the amount of RAM installed.

Read that article. Windows 7 is also videoguy's top recommendation for video editing OS.

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A word of caution: you can't actually "upgrade" Win XP to Win 7; you'll have to either use a clean hard-drive, or copy your current files to another disk and then re-install them into Win 7. Here's some info:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/help/upgrading-from-windows-xp-to-windows-7#T1=tab01

You'll also need to use Windows Easy Transfer to help out. Don't use the File and Settings Transfer Wizard in Windows XP to move your files. It isn't compatible with Windows 7, and if you use it, you won't be able to restore your files in Windows 7. Use Windows Easy Transfer instead.

Hope this helps!

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I wouldn't update an older machine like that. Spend the time transferring files, spending (about) $100, on something you could be marginally satisfied with? Money better spent towards a new(or refurb) machine with a warranty that's designed to handle the software.
That's my $0.02, but then again, I'd dual boot to Ubuntu or Mint and move files off of Windows if needed, i.e., surf with Mint, work offline with XP.

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For an 8 year old machine, I'd advise against purchasing a Win7/8 upgrade license for $100. For $30-100 more you can get an off-lease business grade Dell or HP that's only 3 years old and will come bundled with an OEM copy of Win7 Pro. Check eBay for Dell Optiplex 780's/790's. Or pay a little more at Dell Outlet and it'll come with a short manufacturer warranty. I've bought tons in both places.

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To actually answer part of this question:
http://www.snaggstuff.com/microsoft-windows-7-home-premium-32-bit-full-oem-branded-gfc-00564-brd.html

I just had one of my Farmer's Agents go this route. It is legit. I hope this helps.

BTW, good advice on upgrading on this question. No direct upgrade from XP to Win7. I have used Windows Vista to upgrade an XP machine, then upgraded to 7. Actually not too bad, but maybe a little longer to do.

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@hobbitss: :::fingers in ears::: LA LA LA! I CAN'T HEAR YOU!

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@rlapid2112: I would not recommend 32bit windows for someone who wants to do video editing; 32bit maxes out at 4gb (in some cases actually 3.5gb) RAM. Go 64bit unless you're running a CPU that doesn't do it.

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@lparsons42: Oops, I forgot it was a direct link to the 32-bit product. You're right, about 64-bit since 32-bit can only address 3GB of ram.

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You might want to consider Linux Mint. It will do all your standards; browsing, OpenOffice, email. Valve is also porting all their games to Linux, so you even have gaming alternatives.
If you're sold on Windows 7, there are websites that carry branded OEM discs. Fully licensed, but no support. Snaggstuff does for around $70.
http://www.snaggstuff.com/microsoft-windows-7-home-premium-64-bit-full-oem-branded-gfc-00599-brd.html

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XP Is Not Dead Yet!!!

@magic cave: Having missed the fun of DOS, I searched for and found my last remaining DOS commands Manual from 23 years ago...

CD
DIR/P
COPY FILEa FILEb

Feel better now???

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I am upgrading from Windows 3.11

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@stevenb005: The Deals Woot community is the perfect place to do an online search for deals. You must be new here.... OICUR.