questionsdo you switch from summer to winter tires, vice…

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Nope. I live in Florida so I never need winter tires.

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No, but I probably should. Maybe I'd hate winter less if driving wasn't such a pain.

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I live in north Texas. We don't really get winter here. I mean we might get an ice storm or two but that usually melts by the next day. So no real need for me to have winter tires.

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Nope. In the DC area, all-seasons are good enough for 99 & 44/100% of what I need to do.

When I lived in PA, and had a RWD vehicle, I put snow tires on the back and weight in trunk as well.

I think that advances in tire technology, and perhaps better road clearing, have made them pretty much obsolete, for most people in most situations. Just my $.02 - your experience is obviously very different.

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Up here in NY - I switch. I can tell the difference in handling and response time if my snows are starting to wear out as well. Worth it. All seasons are decent tires. They're great if you don't get heavy snow or ice (mild winters) but not in heavy snow or ice, or that oh-so-fun slushy mix crap. But I wait as long as I can to put on winter tires and pop them off as soon as possible.

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Yes, I have a set of snow tires mounted on rims so it's less hassle. I put them on all 4.
It spit snow yesterday and today and some people have put their snow tires on already, I think it's a little early though.

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Another north Texan here. It rarely snows, so I don't bother with it. My car (RWD sports car) wouldn't handle very well in snow/ice even with the best winter tires, so I just drive very very carefully on the one day it does snow.

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I'm in kinda the same boat as @gt0163c and @rprebel . Midsouthern Arkansas doesn't get enough wintry weather to warrant another set of tires. Careful driving along with improved road-clearing are sufficient enough.

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In Wisconsin snow tires are one of the best investments you can make for your vehicle. I need a set for my new car, the crap all-seasons are terrible in rain, I'm not looking forward to seeing how they do in snow.

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East Tennessee: I opt for the all-season tires. They grip well when it's wet (which can be quite often here) and still work when it snows twice per winter. Winter tires would dry rot before I could use enough tread to make them worthwhile. Summer tires, while nice for 10 out of 12 months, simply do not grip dry pavement well when it's cold out (below 35°F) or worse when it's wet and cold, or snowy and cold, or icy and cold.

I have 2 sets of snow chains for when it gets really dicey out there. They should be plenty here.

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I'm in Houston area, if I needed snow tires, I'd move to Corpus in a heartbeat.

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@lumpthar: I was wondering if anyone would bring up snow chains! I can't remember the last time I saw any.

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@ginawoot: snow chains or even studded tires are illegal in most states, i think the rocky mountain states are the exception. I know they're banned in WI due to how they chew up the pavement.

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I live on a mountain in the Coast Range of NW Oregon. We only get serious snow a few weeks of the year, but often get ice on the roads in winter. I put snow tires on all the family cars each winter (snow tires mounted on separate wheels for convenience). I like the studless snow tires -- I have had excellent results with Bridgestone Blizzaks.

It would only take one excursion into the ditch (or worse!) to pay for a set of snow tires.

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@eraten: Actually (and to my surprise), chains are apparently legal in most states, and some states seem to actually require them if conditions warrant their use. In WI, "Tire chains may be used on any vehicle when required for safety because of snow, ice or other conditions tending to cause a vehicle to skid", although studded tires are generally prohibited for private vehicles, presumably for the reason you mentioned. http://legis.wisconsin.gov/lrb/research/qanda.htm

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I just keep a pair of chains with my spare tire in the winter. Whenever things get dicey I just pull to the side of the road and throw them on.

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@ginawoot: thanks for the info! I guess that I assumed studded tires and chains were covered under the same category