questionsdo you ever speed up your tv/movies to watch more…

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When I used to live with my dad, we would watch football games that way on Tivo although I think it was more like 1.5X or 2X speed. Do you get sound when you watch at 1.25X speed?

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I usually just skip forward a bit if I'm getting bored but some formats won't let me do that with enough control so I'll speed them up.

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Will VLC player allow you to send sound to a second monitor over HDMI? I use xbmc because I can have the video and sound play from my TV (rather than the computer speakers). Does playing it faster make it a higher pitch (like if it was a cassette tape)?

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@benyust2: vlc media player lets you hear proper audio/dialogue at 1.25x, 1.5x and just barely at 2x.

the pitch is slightly effected, but at 1.25x not noticeable.
I use an old p4 2.6ghz with 1.2gb of ram as a media center computer, and vlc has no problem putting the audio into either hdmi or audio out

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When I was younger and listened to the radio ALL the time, I would've bet money that radio stations were doing the same thing. ALL the songs seemed to be playing ever so slightly faster than the actual recordings we had at home. With the local Top 40 station it was especially obvious.

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@lavikinga:
I've worked a little bit with radio advertising, and when a 60 second commercial just couldn't be edited down to less than say, 64seconds, we would speed it up via compression to fit in the allotted spot.

as for the songs being time-compressed, it's possible, but I think you're catching the radio-edits. When a single is released, there are typically lots of different edits/mixes, some only 1-2 seconds shorter. As a club DJ, if a song had a particularly long intro, outro, or breakdown in the middle, I would often cut those out on the fly by having beat-mixing with a second copy of the same song (for breaks in the middle) or beatmixing into or out of another song early.

In the old days, shortening the duration of a song would include a noticeable change in pitch, but today this is done digitally (even with vinyl) via simple time compression that preserves the original key of the song.

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@kamikazeken: I'm aware of different edits for radio vs. album cuts. You've pretty much hit on what I was talking about: an over all speeding up of the song that results in not only something more uptempo, but also a higher pitch. The most recent time I noticed a huge difference was in Justin Timberlake's "Cry Me a River." I download songs to run with according to rhythm and speed for when I do interval training. "Cry Me a River" was downloaded as a cool down/pace myself song. The few times the nano wasn't charged, I took my little radio to run with. When "Cry" came on I slacked my pace to match the song. That's when I noticed things were off. Way off.

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what is really shocking is that some tv networks have actually compressed their broadcasts of weekly shows in order to fit in an extra commercial or two. Removing 1 frame every second or two ads up, and the extra revenue from 2 commercials on a hot show can be substantial.