questionsdo you pronounce 'pin' and 'pen' the same?

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No, I don't pronounce them the same. Think din (noise) and den (a room). Same thing as pin & pen - pronounced differently. Refuse to speculate on who's crazy. ;-)

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I pronounce them differently, but that's just my opinion.

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I didn't know that their were too different spellings four thee same word. As for the OP, if you asked me for a pin I would look at my pocket or tell you my PIN. They sound the same to me. :)

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I pronounce them differently as well. As well as 'axe' and 'ask' although pronouncing both of those the same might just be a southern thing.

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@jsimsace: You said: "I didn't know that their were too different spellings four thee same word. As for the OP, if you asked me for a pin I would look at my pocket or tell you my PIN. They sound the same to me."

;-) Yes, some words are spelled differently, yet pronounced the same. These are NOT 2 of those words.) If someone asked you to find a pin (needle-type thing) they lost in the den - would you think & hear "pin" in the "din?" Or "pen" & "den?" Or maybe someone says the din (noise) is overly loud in the den (room). They are pronounced differently.

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I've a few more to add. Picture is not pronounced "pitcher," and there is no h sound in "street, storm, strawberry," or "strong" or any other word with an "st" in it. It's not "shtorm," nor "shtrawbury" folks! I'm hearing this pronuciation more and more with news anchors. Can't decide if they are consciously over-compensating because they normally hiss when they speak, or if it's some horrible regional thing that is taking over the airwaves.

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@lavikinga: SO agree w/all you said! The h sound annoys me, too. It is not regional. It is incorrect pronunciation. Also dislike the cadence of the newscasters - they emphasize every other word. Hard to listen to. And so, I prefer not to listen to most so-called news shows.

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@lavikinga: "there is no h sound in "street, storm, strawberry," or "strong" or any other word with an "st" in it. It's not "shtorm," nor "shtrawbury" . I have never heard that enunciation. Period.

@gmwhit: Those words you refer to sound alike in SW Arkansas. You Florida girls need a little less refinement....how about a road trip to Arkansas? :)

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If you are from Chicago, they are pronounced the same. I was taught that a copper disc with President Lincoln's head on it was a "pinny", the Southern California school system didn't like the way I pronounced my words and sent me to speech therapy until I could pronounce words correctly. I now know that it is a "penny".

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@jsimsace: They sound alike because they are not pronounced correctly. Whatever. Been to Arkansas; had an aunt & uncle who lived near Midland. Couple of cousins still live in AR. Went there quite a few times to visit & on vacation. Beautiful state. Thanks for the invitation...too far too drive, and wouldn't want to fly there either. ;-)

With affection,
a refined Florida woman.

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of course I don't pronounce them the same pen hen den.... pin tin sin.

If you pronounce those the same, you just ain't right.

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I pronounced them the same, until I started learning dialects in college. The first thing they do is break you of your regional dialect. There's nothing wrong with pronouncing words differently. That's what dialects are. Thinking of others as "wrong" is kind of smug.

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Definitely different.

Here in Minnesota, the natives (I'm not from here lol) would pronounce "Dawn" and "Don" the same as well. Drives me nuts.

But my least favorite is when folks, mostly from the south, will write "I'm going to a yard sell" because to them, "sell" and "sale" are pronounced the same.

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Also, how do you pronounce 'penguin'? With a 'pin' or a 'pen'?

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@rprebel: You said. "...There's nothing wrong with pronouncing words differently. That's what dialects are. Thinking of others as "wrong" is kind of smug."

Smug? Hmmmm Perhaps. Is it smug to think that 'ho' is an incorrect pronunciation of whore? Or that axe is not the correct way to pronounce ask? Definitely dialectical; still, it's not correct. Therefore, I must be considered....smug. ;-)

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@rprebel: It's not smug to know that some people are pronouncing words objectively wrong.

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My parents pronounce them the same but it's ok cuz they're Korean

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It's a regional pronunciation. All pronunciations are regional!

Nevertheless, while living in Indiana, I was planning to drive to unfamiliar territory. A Hoosier told me to make a turn at Dellville. Fortunately I got so lost (not her fault) that I was never confronted with finding Dellville until I made my way home and learned it would have been spelled Daleville anyway, so I would've driven right by it till I hit Kokomo or someplace!!

But your daughter (dotter?!) and you hearing her speech differently?: I think it's been observed that sometimes people used to merging the pronunciations of two close words when conversing in their native regional dialect, are literally unprepared to hear those sounds (re-)distinguished in those words.

Another true story: A couple from Manitoba moved near me in Indiana, and the woman went to open them a bank account. She gave in the information about herself and her husband Don, but received a very strange look when she said his name as Dawn!

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@jsimsace: Start paying attention to newscasters, especially weather girls on radio & TV. Once you start noticing, you won't be able to get away from it. The First Lady does it as well & that's what made me think it must be a regional thing.

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I pronounce pin and pen differently. A short i vowel sound is different than a short e vowel sound. If you pronounce them the same you are mispronouncing them.

Many newscasters grew up in the Midwest as the Midwest is considered to have the least "regional" sounding dialect although you'll find pockets of mispronunciations all over the Midwest too.

I hate when people say Warshington. There's no freaking R in Washington.
Bidness instead of business drives me nuts as does Axe for Ask.
Liberry instead of library, Febuary instead of February, drive me nuts too.

Where I live bretzel is a pronunciation for pretzel. It's because of the regions strong German heritage.

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@tsfisch: I'm in the midwest. Dawn and Don are definitely the same vowel sound. John rhymes with lawn. If I try to pronounce them differently, I feel like I'm speaking in a New England accent.

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while we don't have a consensus on the craziness, it's apparent that most do pronounce these words differently. The major exception seems to be Indiana- where I grew up! My wife comes from south Florida, maybe those have a similar accent?

My daughter lives in Maryland, which probably explains how her pronunciation differs from ours.

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I do not. I also know the difference between "then" and "than"!

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@josephus: Merlin has all kinds of crazyness going on. Even weirder if you head out from Balmer, and you get that odd mix of Pennsy hill people and that Philly/Balmer accent. That will drive your ears crazy.

Poconos has a weird one too in spots. Lots of New Yorkers moved out there about 10 years ago so you get that accent mixed with some southern accent and then some of Slavic accent you get from Pennsy mining areas (Pittsburgher to an extent). That I can't even describe.

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@psumek: even within the Balmer area, hon, there are pretty stark differences.

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@omnichad: You are apparently near the same ignorance level as I am......Dawn/Don sound the same as do John/lawn. ;) @tsfisch: "sale" and "sell" are interchanged because of poor spelling, not pronunciation. :) @gmwhit: Midland? Seriously? You probably drove through here to get there....it's about 25 miles north on Hwy. 71. Anyway, you stated that "They sound alike because they are not pronounced correctly. Whatever." IIRC, the OP asked if we pronounced them the same and wasn't asking for judgment.

Affection returned,
a high school honors graduate redneck ;>)

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@jsimsace: Observing the self-proclaimed 'redneck'...yes, it is rather reddish. The brain seems to function quite well, though. ;-) Perhaps disproving "The You are a Redneck if..." line of thinking. Re: Arkansas It's been many, many years since I've been there. When I was a child, we visited relatives there, and also spent some time camping, fishing at Lake Ouachita. Wonderful memories!

Must say that the OP did ask if he & his wife, were "crazy." Or his daughter. Seems to be asking for some kind of judgment, doesn't it? I refused to respond on the who's crazy issue. Chose instead to speak to the pronunciation of words. Think I may be done now. :-D

Apologies to the OP for the Arkansas diversion.

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@gmwhit: I'm done. ♥ Now I'm off to apologize to another member on another thread....

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I say pin and pen the same, and I say din and den the same. And when others say them, I can rarely hear the difference. But I do KNOW the difference and can pronounce them differently if I think about it and am doing so to specifically talk about the fact that some people pronounce them differently. It's just unnatural for me to do it in regular speech.

While people are throwing words like these out there in this thread, let me add my own pet peeve: The word "Realtor" not not have an A or an I between the L and the T. It is pronounced like "Real Tore", not "Real A Tore". Realtor. And, since it's a trademark, it should always be capitalized when written. (There are real estate agents who aren't Realtors. The words "real estate agent" aren't capitalized, but Realtor is.)

m

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Despite living in Texas, no. I live in far west Texas and we don't have a regional accent. Whenever we travel people ask us where we are from and them comment on our lack of accents. I can "do" an east Texas twang, but it isn't the default.

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of course no, i prononce pin with a little biting tounge, but pen not