questionswould you give out the password to any of your…

vote-for76vote-against
vote-for29vote-against

I am against it. If I were looking for a job and an employer asked me for my Facebook/Twitter/whatever password, I would say no. If they persisted, I would walk out of the interview.

vote-for6vote-against

I don't have any accounts with social media - don't want any either.

vote-for52vote-against

"By viewing my accounts, you will have access to information you are not allowed to ask me in an interview like age, race, marital status etc. By asking for my password, I can only assume you are attempting to circumvent laws which help protect against discrimination. Know that if you insist on having my password as a pre-condition, I will have no choice but to report you to the EEOC, Labor Department, BBB and the state Attorney General.

Now, did you really want my password?"

vote-for9vote-against

@sadsephiroth: Because nobody goes against facebook policy. There isn't anyone under 13 on the site. Really. :0

I do agree that that is a consideration, but clearly the companies that are asking aren't concerned about that...or they could ask you to log in for them.

vote-for-22vote-against

If you have nothing to hide, what does it matter?

vote-for18vote-against

@packman711: HUH!!!??? It matters because we are live in a country with a right to privacy. It seems as though the further we go, the more rights we give away. Reminds me of the quote..."They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety". ~ Ben Franklin... Same principle.

I will NEVER give out my passwords. I'll delete my accounts first.

vote-for8vote-against

If I did, I'd change it to something snarky first, like when Sheldon keeps changing the password on their wi-fi (for Penny's benefit).

Not that I have anything to hide. :-D

vote-for8vote-against

@packman711: It's not about having anything to hide, it's about things not being anyone else's business.

That was taken from this article.

vote-for9vote-against

big difference between giving someone your password and username vs having someone check your receipt at the supermarket exit. and yes i do have something to hide.

vote-for14vote-against

The password for my social sites is the same password I use on my luggage.

1 2 3 4 5

vote-for6vote-against

@wootfast: exactly. i don't want my company to know that i'm a superhero/country rap singer by night.

vote-for10vote-against

I wouldn't want to work for a company that has such blatant disrespect for privacy before they've even hired me, to be honest. This is coming from someone who is currently unemployed and looking.

I realize not everyone has the option of turning that down, though, and I truly feel for someone who feels it's their only option.

vote-for9vote-against

It's easy to say no when you already have a job and the question is hypothetical. But imagine if you've been unemployed for months. Money's tight and you have a family to support. Mortgage/rent hasn't been paid in a couple of months, one of your kids is sick and you don't have medical insurance. After months of searching, you finally land an interview for a job that offers a decent salary and full benefits, but during the job interview they ask for your Facebook password "just to help with their background check". How easy is it to say no then?

vote-for7vote-against

As a rule I don't put anything particularly interesting on Facebook. It is far too easy for information to find its way into places I'd rather it not go. There are thousands of stories of somebody going off on their boss in a status update, only to find said boss waiting for them in the morning with said status update in hand. And a pink slip.

That said, I'd still refuse to give my username and pw to any personal accounts as a matter of principle and logic. There isn't anything that need to know in there.

vote-for6vote-against

@lisaviolet: my password is "thiscompanyviolatesmycivlrights", no spaces :)

vote-for4vote-against

Would anyone consider making a secondary facebook page, rather than lose the chance at said hypothetical job?

vote-for9vote-against

I'd simply circle "No" when they asked if I had any social media accounts, tell them I deleted said accounts and then "start up" a new one after I either got accepted or declined for the job.

vote-for-3vote-against

@rprebel: While I agree (and I was trying to be the devil's advocate), my point is if there's something that you don't want your employer to see, should it really be there? My old football coach used to say "if you're doing something you wouldn't tell your mother, should you really be doing it?" I agree with the right to privacy wholeheartedly, just trying to bring a bit of perspective...

vote-for5vote-against

@okham: I know someone who did that, she started over on FB when she started applying for jobs. She was already working, but wanted an upgrade.

vote-for5vote-against

@packman711: Yeah, it should be on there. It's what privacy settings are for. You can share what you want with who you want by messaging. If they had a password, they could see those, too.

vote-for5vote-against

If said company wanted to give me the password for their server I'd be for it. Although it's most likely something impossible to guess like "password1" or something 1337 like that.

vote-for6vote-against

Not only no, but hell no.

Depending on how much I needed to actually get the job, I may just tell them I don't use them anymore so don't know what the password is.

vote-for4vote-against

@carl669: The problem with this is that they'll just say "No, that's okay." and not hire you. They can site any number of a million reasons they didn't hire you that have nothing to do with that and they can't really be reasonably argued.

vote-for14vote-against

Since I work in the IT field, I would think this is a test and tell them "no."

Never give out your passwords, folks.

vote-for8vote-against

@packman711: What I do and say outside of the workplace has nothing to do with anything or anyone in the workplace. It's none of the boss's business. The only thing they should be focused on is my job performance. Thanks for posting the "nothing to hide" argument, though. Gave me a reason to track down a counter-argument to that logical fallacy.

I disagree with your old football coach. If we avoided doing or saying things we wouldn't do or say in front of our mothers, the world would be an extremely boring place. It might help with the overpopulation problem, though. I mean, how many of us would want to procreate in front of our mothers?

vote-for3vote-against

@packman711: So using your old football coach's quote, you wouldn't want to ever have sex would you? Because that would make for one awkward conversation with your mom about how your wife/gf/partner is in bed. See? Some things are nobody's business.

vote-for11vote-against

This is a very simple issue of right and wrong. Read @carl669 's answer again, because he nailed the key issue and response. The EEOC exists because of past abuses.

Individuals in power can always try to extort more than they have a right to. Would you have sex with the boss to get a job? Will you bribe the HR person 25% of your pay to get a job? Will you let a goon search your house, read your mail to get a job? Change your religion? Join a mob lynching?

No! The quid pro quo of employment is your skill and effort to do a task in return for compensation. Unless your job depends on some characteristic, it is not relevant and falls outside an interview requirement.

If I was asked, my answer would be NO! and my next actions would be efforts to correct an abuse of power by that person or company.

The very acquiescence to and acceptance of such things leads to a loss of individuality, liberty and freedom which so many give lip service to, but fail to defend.

vote-for3vote-against

@godzirra: true. but chances are, i'm not willing to work for a company that wants that much access anyway unless i'm really desperate. and in that case, my answer would be "Sorry, I don't use (insert social media site here)".

vote-for5vote-against

@rprebel: I agree with your sentiment, but unfortunately people are losing their jobs or being censured because of postings on social media sites. I keep waiting for the courts to get to work on it, but so far it seems quiet unless I missed something.

vote-for5vote-against

@tpscan: Most of your points I agree with...

But for one of your points... It would depend on if the boss was hot. :)

vote-for4vote-against

I would only agree to give them my FB password in exchange for the admin password to their HRM / personnel system....

vote-for3vote-against

@rprebel: I guess it all depends what industry you work in. In mine, legally I have to report aspects of my personal life, so it doesn't much matter to me. For others, it may not be as paramount to/for their profession.

vote-for2vote-against

@rprebel: And, while I disagree with most of your view, I'd never write on your Facebook wall saying so :)

vote-for9vote-against

My response to this would be, if I worked here, and received a phone call from one of your competitors, asking me to share confidential or proprietary information about this company, would you expect me to say yes, or would you prefer I have the personal integrity to say no, that's not right, I can't let you do that.

In addition, sharing a username and password would open many people up to identity theft issues, for anyone who uses the same, or similar, passwords on a wide range of websites, such as banking/credit card sites.

vote-for6vote-against

Short answer: No Flippin' way.

Long answer: I have made the mistake before of taking a job at a company I wasn't sure I wanted to be part of. Tempted by more money, higher title or whatever... It's not worth it. Any company that just isn't a right fit is a recipe for misery, and work takes up too much of your life to be miserable there (good advice I got from a great boss early in my career...).

Here's the relevant part to this question: any company that even asks for my social login is by definition "not the right fit" for me. What's next? Video cameras in my home? Copy of my voting registration? Lists of charities to which I donate. I'm your employee, not your friend, not your pal, and definitely not your servant. (Humming "you don't own me" in background).

vote-for3vote-against

@packman711: If I may be so bold, isn't it also this: "I may not agree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it..." In any case, I heartily agree with you.

vote-for4vote-against

@tpscan: Agree. "The tree of liberty must be occasionally nourished with the blood of patriots..." So compared to blood, extending one's job search a bit more to pass on those who try to impede it seems small enough price to pay.

vote-for5vote-against

@godzirra: At my age we call the heat "power surges".

vote-for6vote-against

@lisaviolet: I like that one. My friend calls them "Personal Summers." ;)

vote-for4vote-against

I barely give out my passwords to my wife... like heck I'd give it to a potential employer.

vote-for5vote-against

@tippypaws: I'd have to call them "personal summer nights". grinning

vote-for4vote-against

I would absolutely not. I'm totally OK with not discussing my job after being hired on social sites, but no way would I hand over my passwords.

vote-for4vote-against

@atomicorange: My husband just reads over my shoulder. When I give him the perturbed "what?" look, he says "you type so fast!"

:facepalm:

vote-for2vote-against

@godzirra: Ha!

I'll concede that may have been a bad example, but I'll stick to the principle that demanding a "personal reward" in exchange for job consideration is an abuse of power, for the purposes of this thread.

Now if they are hot? That's a choice you are free to exercise. Let that be an after-interview discussion, not a conditional one.

BTW -- I had about six other replies I was going to post, one included the words "Aspirin" and "Limbaugh" but discretion, valor and a smattering of experience lead me to stay closely on topic. ;-)

I considered saying;
-- Rule of thumb: When an employer says, "let me give you a tip ...", his hands should not be on his zipper.

Nope, let's not go there. >grins<