questionshave you seen schindler's list?

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I saw it when it came out, but only once. Once was enough. Yes, it's a very powerful film.

Good soundtrack, from what I can remember.

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I saw it for the 1st time in high school in the theater. Our school took those of us in World History class to see it. I think I've cried some each time I've watched it (and I don't cry easily).

And like @rprebel said, excellent soundtrack.

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It's one for the tissue box for sure.

An interesting thing about these histories is that they take a lot of effort to bring them out. Spielberg worked tirelessly to track this down and get it out there. The book that was written would not have been published if the writer had not agreed to call it a novel.

Another story that is usually required reading in some schools, The Diary Of Anne Frank, an actual diary by the actual girl that she wrote before she was found by Nazis in Amsterdam, Holland. In Los Angeles there is the Museum of Remembrance and also the Holocaust Museum, somewhat near to each other if you are ever visiting the city and want to learn more. Israel has their own famous museum likewise. Each of these displays are very powerful, and they show you, they make you feel, the scope of the atrocities and the strength of humanity that was forced through its obstacles.

It takes a lot of courage to seek these places out and to look. I'm very glad you saw Schindler's List.

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Yes. Had nightmares. Very intense.
and then I watched it again later to pick up some of the nuances I knew I missed. It was a long film, and rightfully so. Just saying I saw a lot of things the second time I missed the first. I was more prepared the second time, but it still got to me.

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@srfoolishbuyer: I was in Amsterdam a few weeks ago and went by the Anne Frank house. The line was about a block and a half long and two or three people wide in most places on a terribly cold and snowy day.

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Yes, I saw it in the theater when it first came out and I remember being as moved as you were. I guess we're fortunate that we can't even imagine such things, while others actually endure them.

I rank it up there with Sophie's Choice, as far as putting me on the emotional brink.

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I saw it when it was first released. I was a Senior in high school and thought it was quite powerful.

Having had a Jewish upbringing and having studied the Holocaust in Hebrew school as well as during a trip to Israel, the atrocities taking place on screen weren't new to me, so the movie did not leave as strong an impression as it could have, but it's just a really well done movie that earned its place in film history.

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I will say that although the subject material was depressing and tragic, I didn't become a bawling baby until the moment Oskar Schindler broke down at the end wishing he could have saved more people. I don't know why that moment hit me so hard, but I cried for at least a few straight minutes.

Ralph Fiennes as Amon Goeth was perhaps the greatest villain I've ever seen portrayed on film and I had to remind myself that he was an actual person in history.

On a lighter note, anyone remember this?

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The OP's reaction is proof that movies are better than books. Movies FTW!

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I saw it in theaters when it first came out. I saw it with a friend at a matinee showing. I remember not being able to do much else the rest of the day other than sit or maybe walk around and think. Just so overwhelming.
This was the movie that started my "Excellent movies I never want to see again" list.

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@curtisuxor: Amon Goeth was a real-life monster. They actually downplayed the character in the movie because he would have been too unbelievable if they'd gone with the full truth.

I am also one of the "seen it once." crew. It's an amazing movie, but I think that it puts into pictures some of the things that we naturally try to ignore. Of course on an academic level we know horrible things happened in the camps, but it's another thing to actually see it, even a reenacted version of it.

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@bsmith1: Without books there would be fewer movies. Many movies are based on books. I agree that getting a story from a movie is faster, more dramatic and less work. But before there were movies the books that people read weren't different than the ones we still have. They used their imaginations to make movies in their minds. And, in the books, they had more to work with.

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@zuiquan: I always have the impression that a visit to the house is like a pilgrimage. Some people cry there, some people are in awe there. I hear tell that some people are dumbstruck by the plain-ness, by the small size, and by the fact they can still see the tree she wrote about.

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@zuiquan: I always have the impression that a visit to the house is like a pilgrimage. Some people cry there, some people are in awe there. I hear tell that some people are dumbstruck by the plain-ness, by the small size, and by the fact they can still see the tree she wrote about. I've never been there, but I'm sure I'd have all these feelings. Did you see the episode of Gene Simmons Family Jewels when Gene and Shannon visited?

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I've seen it twice, but it's been a long time and I would like to see it again.

Another film depiction that is incredibly well-done and emotionally draining is in an episode of Band of Brothers, showing the liberation of one of the camps, and the Allied soldiers having absolutely no idea what the place was, and coming to understand the unbelievable atrocities firsthand.