questionswhich is higher? your annual income or your…

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Income. I do not have too much debt at the moment but looking to buy a new car which will change things.

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Income. I hate debt. I once had a boss tell me I never met a bill that I didn't like (because silly me, I wanted to pay them).

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Right now, just about to get out of college looking for a teaching position? Definitely the debt. I have however been doing quite a bit of research into the Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program as well as the Income-Based Plan in hopes to have it all paid off sooner (i.e. 10 years) instead of the very common 20-30 years. I didn't receive any sort of grant money, few scholarships, and no parental assistance in any form whatsoever so it was difficult not to accrue quite a bit of debt.

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Income. Debt is accrued for online purchases and emergencies only. Or, in the case of a juicy wootoff, both apply.

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Debt. Student with no income and federal loans. Hopefully that'll change once I've graduated and got a good job though.

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Income. Hope to keep it that way.

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After a $3000 mistake the day after I turned 18 that took a few years to rectify, I have no more than $500 in revolving debt at any given time. Luckily my income exceeds that :)

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Annual income. Credit cards are paid in full monthly.

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My wife and I went through the "it's okay, we'll pay it off next month" mentality early in our marriage, but through some good decision making and dedication, we're done with that stuff now. The only thing we owe on is our home, and a rental property (our hold home that we couldn't sell because of market conditions).
I'm paying cash for everything nowadays

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Annual retirement income. The only credit card purchases are online or major purchases and paid in full monthly.

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We have zero debt, save our mortgage. I have greater than zero income :)

And my mortgage is getting down to the point where I almost make more annually.

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Mortgage isn't revolving debt (nor is a car loan, though I would never take out a loan longer than a few months to buy a car and thus never have had a real car loan, just used credit cards when I needed some extra cash for a car). If I ignore my mortgage then my income is way higher than my debt.

Though I've decided it is safer to use credit cards (and my high credit scores) to finance my daughter's educations, so my revolving debt will be climbing a bit for the next five years or so. (After college, no more child support payments, so that debt will go away within three years unless I stretch it out longer.) Thus far, my revolving debt is averaging below 3% APR, so I'm not terribly concerned about it. (Student loans survive bankruptcy, credit cards do not, so if the crap hits the fan, all my debt will go away.)

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Student loans, car payments, and mortgages aren't revolving debt, people. That's installment debt.

Anyway, my income is higher than my revolving debt because I don't have any!

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income, i must control myself towards beautiful things...

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Income. Never been in debt, and I hope I never will be, with the sole exception of a mortgage;

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Income, so long as we're not counting student loans :)

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Income. My revolving debt is paid of monthly, and the only other debt I have is my mortgage.

I just graduated from college, and I love the adult life. Bills, bills, mortgage, bills. Woot!

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Revolving debt, my income is higher. I try to keep my debt levels below 6 weeks of income. Anything above that, it would take me YEARS to pay down. Right now I am on track to be revolving debt free by the end of the year, and that is a great feeling!

Now if we were talking debt in general, between the car, mortgage, etc. I am in debt for about 2.5 of my yearly income.

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My income is higher than my revolving debt. If you throw in installment debt, which would just be my mortgage, they are about equal. The car is paid off, and I have no intention of buying another for quite a while. I owe about half a year's pay to credit card companies and about half a year's pay on my house. However, the equity in my house and the balance in my retirement, deferred savings and health savings accounts are 4x the amount of my total debt. So although I have way too much credit card debt, I consider myself to be reasonably solvent.

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I'm pretty sure most of the people with revolving debt greater than their income aren't as likely to post on this thread than those not in that predicament.

I racked up thousands in credit card bills with very little to show for it. I finally came clean to my family, who bailed me out. I now keep one credit card and pay it off every month. I am repaying my family a few hundred dollars every month, and I should be done by February. I consider myself very lucky for this second chance.

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@curli76: "I am repaying my family a few hundred dollars every month, and I should be done by February."

I just wanted to say good for you. :)