questionsdo you pronounce things differently than other…

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I pronounce things differently than most around me but that is because I enunciate and I don't use much slang. I am about to start as an English teacher so I have never been one to enjoy slang or anything like that. The kids and youth I work with get mad at me all the time because I require them to speak English and when they text me I require them to write complete sentences. I have them rewrite anything that comes in with sry, thx or anything like that. I know this isn't what you asked, but clarity of speech will change how some things are pronounced.

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i say 'pop' and everyone else says 'soda'. does that count?

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I was out in Rochester, NY the past two days (darn you, Woot Off spies watching my travel plans) and there's a town "Chili" out by the airport. I said "Chilly" and was IMMEDIATELY corrected by the locals with the correct pronunciation, which sounded to me like "Ch-eye-lie".

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Frederica looks spanish, and that's the default "foreign" pronunciation to guess at when someone sees a fancy-looking word.

I think the strange part is that most people complain about words being pronounced "wrong" when it's actually closer to the original language or the original city name as pronounced by the founders.

Example - I live in Illinois. The 's' is silent, but nobody pronounces it like it's a french word. I would guess it's probably "supposed" to be pronounced ih-luh-nwha, while we complain if people don't say ill-in-oy and would look at them like they're crazy for the former pronunciation.

Louisville also being named after a french person, I think everyone should at least get that the s is silent, but just look at St. Louis. Named after a different French Louis guy, but almost universally pronounced with the 's.'

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@omnichad: And I forget Los Angeles, which is probably supposed to be and likely was originally pronounced "Lows On-hell-aise"

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@flashkill: Isn't requiring full spelling in a 160-character limited text a bit overkill? I mean - sure, unlimited texting plans mean that a 3-text message is just as easy as 1, but not everyone has that.

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@omnichad: um I'm pretty sure Illinois is a native american word (Algonquin tribe), not french

but speaking of Illinois, there's a town there named Cairo, but pronounced Cay-roh. That one just bothers me.

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@durkzilla: Hahaha, I went to school at the U of R in good old Rachacha. Ohhhh Chili, buncha snobs ;)

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Around here, hello is pronounced hola (o-la).

On a more serious not, no, it's not that bad where I live, even though the city as a whole is over 2/3rds Hispanic. I just (try) keep an open mind about other folks pronunciations ... you say toMAto, I say TOmato. No guarantees I won't try to correct someone when they pronounce taco as take-o, however.

Spelling and grammar, OTOH ... (My shirt of the morning - Not Paying Attention)

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@sdibo10: No, Illinois is what the French called the Illiniwek tribe.

Edit: Illiniwek is the Algonquin word for man. I can't read this morning.

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the word pizza which is pronounced kjdnknkndij around my neighborhood. the k's have a long e sound.

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i definitely pronounce a few things differently than those here in northern Illinois. for example, they all pronounce it as "pop" and i pronounce it as "so-duh".

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I pronounce a lot of words differently than the people in my area--but this is because I lack the Southern accent I was supposed to come equipped with. :) Ones I often notice are cities that end in -ville, including my home town. I always say it as "-ville," whereas most just say "-vuhl."

Speaking of, how ARE you supposed to pronounce "Louisville," btw? I have friends that moved there who've made fun of me for saying "LOO-ee-ville" (with a long "ee") and they seem to say "LOO-uh-vul" (with that good ol' schwa sound).

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@heyjoie: I tend to pronounce it LOO-ih-ville, though I am from IL and only rarely say it. It just sounds right to me. Dropping the silent S and otherwise pronouncing it as Louis-ville

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My girlfriend lives near Dubois Ave in Valley Stream NY. The street is named after some guy who lived in the area years ago and is properly pronounced "due-boys" rather than "due-bwa" (I was told that he was adamant that he wasn't some fancy French or Canadian guy.)

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I work with people from all over the country and I'm the only one they consistently call out for my dialect.

I say cum-er-cial instead of com-ar-cial
and something like melk instead of milk.

Not sure how this calls for more lampooning than my coworker from Texas that says thee-ate-er instead of thee-ter.

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@sdibo10:

In upstate NY, the town of Cairo is pronounced "care-oh" (we've spent a week or two each year near there for about a decade and learned that the first time we went grocery shopping there). Now it comes naturally but for the first few years it didn't.

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@baqui63: Well, that person with a french ancestry gave up his heritage and Americanized his name. That's really all fine, too, and I anglicize fairly often on food names. I agree, though, if it was named after him, it should be pronounced like his name was pronounced.

However, a lot of names date much farther back, like Louisville.

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The one that always gets me in trouble is "Adidas" - because I lived in Germany for 6 years and know that it is pronounced AH-dee-dahs and not uh-DEE-das.

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@baqui63: We have a Cairo in IL (southernmost town in IL, I believe). I think they pronounce it Kay-roh. That just sounds utterly wrong to me, especially when Southern IL is often referred to as Little Egypt (due to the two rivers' convergence resembling the Nile delta, per Wikipedia).

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@captainsuperdawg: By any chance do you live in the big O? Most people I know, who have lived there all of their lives, pronounce it FRED-I-CA. My grandma (born and raised in KY) always pronounced it .

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@captainsuperdawg: I made a pitstop at DFW Airport and one of the ladies announced over the loud speaker that the flight for LEWIS-VILLE was leaving shortly.

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I say "skahns" while most around me say "skohns". The former (the way it was pronounced in my family growing up) is how it's said where the yummy baked goodies originated, the latter seems to be the Americanized "Starbucks" version.

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I do but then I'm Scottish living in NC and they all speak funny round here.

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I was born and raised in the Western suburbs of Chicago, so my entire family has the Midwest accent, but somehow I pronounce some words with a Bostonian accent. I've never even been to the Northeast!

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There is a town in Kansas called Arkansas City. Most people would think it's pronounced like the state or Arkansas, but those that live there sound it out:

Ar-kansas City, Kansas

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@prosperouscheat: Do you still have your accent, or is it slowly disappearing?

@squirtle456: Born and raised. Can't say I'm a huge fan of it though.

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When I first moved to the Orlando area, I was corrected immediately for mispronouncing the city of Kissimmee. Trust me, It is not kiss-a-me. It's ka(short a)-sim-me. @woothulhu: The Arkansas/Kansas thing has always puzzled me. Where in the world did the 'saw' come from? <---rhetorical question ;-)

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@gmwhit: Answer to your rhetorical question: Kansas and Arkansaw (original spelling) are both from Native American languages, but not the same one, which is why they are pronounced differently. The real question is: What idiot thought the phonetic spelling of Arkansaw should be changed to something that looks like "Ar-Kansas" and was bound to cause confusion?

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All the crap in NY is the one that gets me. Houston is house-ton and people have already given the other examples. I live in LA and most of us say things the same way from what I've noticed. There might be a bigger divide between NorCal and SoCal but I think it all comes down to culture. Oh and speaking of LA since someone mentioned how it should be pronounced, the original name of the city was "El Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles del Río de Porciúncula"

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Does pronouncing words differently include abbreviating or shortening them? If so, I prefer to clearly enunciate all syllables of both words, rather than shortening them to ma fa (or similar) or mother.

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I'm from Mississippi and most people in the South say "Bayou" as "Bah-ewe" (the "you" is pronounced like the normal everyday use.."you are cool" "you are not cool!").

However, the small part of Mississippi I'm from, the Delta, pronounces Bayou as "bah-YO" like "YO, MTV RAPS!"

It's odd and people can't wrap there heads around it, but that's how we say it!

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Coupon.

I was raised saying "q-pon" but as I've gotten older I now say "coo-pon."

But I've noticed I hear both versions quite often.

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Where I live (moved here about a year ago) the main waterway is the Rivanna River. I and most visitors pronounce the "riv" as in river, but the locals pronounce it RYE-vanna.
Where I used to live in SE Tennessee, there's lots of examples, but one is the town of Ooltewah. I have always pronounced it phonetically (Ool-te-wah), but most of the locals would say Oo-du-wah.
Probably a combination of being raised by upper-midwest accented parents in the deep south...

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@mustardsquarepants: I always heard it q-pon from my parents, but then the locals would always say it cue-pin.

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Another example from where I grew up is the "villes" of Tennessee. All the natives say "vull" as in Nash-vull and Knox-vull. Drove me crazy!

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Carmel vs. Caramel?

Ketchup vs. Katsup?

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@woothulhu: For me it's CAR-mul!!! Care-a-mel has always driven me crazy!
As my old boss once said, you don't drive a "care" to work.
Ketchup or catsup, doesn't matter to me, cause I hate the stuff!

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@woothulhu: Carmel is my first response. And ketchup. Those are my final answers.

How about the city of Norfolk (VA)? Nor-foke seems the gentle way. Just read this: "...it's pronounced noh'*, with accent on the first syllable not the second. The second syllable is somewhat truncated by locals so that it does not sound like a bad word." I have heard it pronounced that way, and it doesn't sound bad. Honest.

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I once heard servers in Pennsylvania will, when taking drink orders, ask "Can I get your drinks awhile?". Really?

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@woothulhu, @gewoodworth:

It's (probably) actually short for "Can I get your drinks order while you decide what you want to eat?" I was born and raised in NY City, but my mother was from (near) Greenville, SC and I spent many summers visiting down there. I have a cousin who uses the "awhile" and means it this way (she used to work at the Waffle House).

FWIW, I do not have a NY accent, possibly because my father was from Czechoslovakia (now Slovakia) and worked hard to speak English without any accent. Regardless of the reason, I have been told a number of times that I speak "unaccented US English" (whatever that means).

However, I easily (and unconsciously) pick up the accent of those around me. (I once spent a week on an offshore oil rig in Brasil bunking with a guy from Glasgow; by the end of the week I sounded very much like him.)

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There is a VERY large lake(and a river as well) near here that is spelled Ouachita(an Indian tribe). Newbies say it as "oh-ah-cheetah" but it is pronounced as "wash-uh-taw". There is also a road and lake named Chalybeate that newbs pronounce as "shall-uh-bee-tee" but it is pronounced "klee-but". Go figure.

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Where I live there is a city called Tooele pronounced "too-il-a" and I spent some time in West Texas. Where Pecos is "pAy-cus" and Miami Texas is "mi-AM-uh".

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@jsimsace: Are you in Arkansas(saw)? If so, I've been to that huge man-made lake. Many, many years ago it was lovely and not overtaken by people.

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@michaelkriss: Many people I know from Missouri pronounce their state as "Miss-oor-uh"

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@captainsuperdawg: Born & raised in MissourE. Left there many years ago, but it could be I've been pronouncing wrong all of my life.

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For the most part, I do not - I have somehow avoided the influence of Greater Boston Area natives since I'm in New Hampshire. I am notorious for pronouncing "Reputable" as "Re-pewt-able" though, which my wife is happy to have a laugh at :x

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@gmwhit: Yes, I am in Arkansas. I don't think there is another place like here...