questionswhat is something that happened to you in school…

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There are a lot of things that can't be done at many schools, one that comes to mind from when I grew up is physical contact, if we misbehaved we sometimes got the "ruler" smacked across the hand.

Others:
No more detention
Can't take recess away
No more kids failing (no child left behind)
And the list continues to grow

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An older bully took a dollar from me during class. After class in the hallway I slammed him against the wall asking for my dollar back. I hear a throat clear to my right side. A teacher's voice said, "boys do we have a problem?"
I slowly looked over and said "no, I was just getting my dollar back." I started to let the bully go and realized I had him slightly off his feet.
I got my dollar back and never got picked on again from him, and did not get in any trouble. Today most certainly detention/suspension would have been the out come.

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When I went to school in Virginia, all the kids carried knives and many of them brought rifles during hunting season. No one was ever injured and I cannot recall anyone even being threatened with the weapons. Fist fights happened occasionally, but it never escalated beyond that. Today kids can get into trouble for drawing a picture of a knife or a gun.

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My teacher took me and my friend to pro hockey games in 4th grade. She was a sweetheart... But I'm afraid she probably would have lost her job in today's world.

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When I was in junior high some of the more unruly boys were kicking holes in the plaster walls in the bathroom. So the vice principal thought it would be a good idea to set up a hidden video camera to catch the perpetrator "red-handed" or so he said. The only thing that happened after the camera was discovered was he was told to remove it. I don't think he would have gotten off so lightly today filming boys in the bathroom.

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My math teacher in high school told us a story about how he and his wife and went to a concert over the weekend where they ran into a couple of former students and how they all ended up getting high together. Probably shouldn't have shared that with us back then, but if it happened today I bet that story would have spread like wildfire and he wouldn't have been back the next day....

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I graduated in 1996... so it was some time ago, but not THAT long ago. Our school had a smoking section.... FOR STUDENTS!

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Everyone in my school spoke English.

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We kept score in sports. When we won, we got 25 cent treat tickets for the concession stand. When we lost, we got 10 cent treat tickets. Oh the horror of keeping score and learning how to win and lose.

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@tarasadies: Umm, nope, that still happens.

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@jha1223: Umm, scores are still kept in sports.

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@lpgstock: Ummmmmmm, that's really weird.

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@eeekdageek: Uhhhhhhhh, many schools still have detention. Kids can still fail by repeating the same class.

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@iggz: What age do they start? I went to a number of my nephews games (soccer and baseball). They don't keep score and they switch sides (in baseball at least) once every kid has gotten a chance to hit. For what it is worth, this was in Des Moines.

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I carried a pocket knife every day from about 8th grade on.

My high school journalism teacher used to smoke, in his classroom or in the print shop, after school while grading papers, often with students around. He supervised us when we were putting the newspaper together every week and we regularly were there until 9 or 10pm. He often bought us (fast food) meals. If one of us was having a tough time with life or school or whatever, it wasn't unusual for him to take us into another classroom to have a private chat, give us some advice, give us a hug, etc.

My fourth grade teacher kept a "treat jar" filled with candy on a shelf. If you were particularly clever or funny or whatever, she'd tell you to go get a treat.

We used to switch papers for like spelling and math tests and grade them. When we finished, the teacher would call out names and whoever graded the paper would call out the score.

My precalc teacher showed us home movies of his hunting trips on occasion.

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Odd thing when I was in school I was taught 'subjects.' Never spent time learning how to take tests. Teaching to perform well on SATs, etc. did not exist.

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My initial thought was similar to @eeekdageek's comment about physical contact, but in the other direction: I remember crying in class (second grade) because my dog was being spayed and I was worried that she wouldn't wake up from the anesthesia, and one of my male teachers gave me a hug and said he understood my worries. I can't imagine a male teacher giving a hug to a student today, even in the classroom with the entire class present.

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It was not anxiety, but a new pair of prescription glasses - my first actually - in the 4th grade. The teacher called me up to the front of the class to the board to solve an arithmetic problem. I picked up the chalk and remember thinking "this looks easy" and fainted dead away! Hey, maybe that was the start of my math problems!

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In junior high and senior high it wasn't uncommon to have more than one teacher out in the hallway paddling a student with no witnesses. I don't think that's allowed today under any circumstances.

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Being left handed, I had one teacher who decided I needed to be right handed. She kept me after school and made me practice writing with my right hand almost every day. She held my right hand in correct position, basically crushing it! This was 4th grade so it was a more than a little embarrassing since my classmates knew what was going on.

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@conanthelibrarian: I was evidently a lefty until I entered the public school system, where I "learned" to be a righty. I'm pretty young for this thread, so this definitely still happens, although maybe not to such a degree.

I had a younger history teacher in middle school who was a marine, and spent all his free time on his students. After-school projects (building a pyramid, a scale chariot, operating trebuchet, etc.), and even just fun things. I remember one day he and I trawled the local junkyard for some auto parts, and spent a snowy day fixing some cosmetic damage on the vice principal's van. He even took a few of his favorite "goons" (yours-brown-nosingly-truly included) to the go-kart track in the summer once.

Long story short: there were some sexual misconduct allegations years after I left, and he was suspended faster than a blink. He'd just returned from Afghanistan, and the combination of what was likely PTSD and the suspension led to suicide.

I miss you, Brian.

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@snoopjedi:

(I guess what I'm getting at is that teacher-student closeness is frowned upon more often than it is celebrated.)

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I find this thread interesting, especially some of the things you say wouldn't be allowed today! What the media depicts vs. what really happens in day-to-day life is often very different.

-I keep treats and candy in my desk, and students get rewarded for great comments, winning a round of a trivia game (yes, I keep score!!) or things like that.
-I give out detentions more than I give out candy, and I'm pretty liberal with the candy distribution. For 6th graders, they sit after school and copy out of the dictionary for 45 minutes in silence. Detention is alive and well!
-I fail students all the time. You don't do the work, sorry, you aren't gonna get a good grade. If a student legitimately needs help, I'll gladly give tutoring, extra work, and opportunities to make up or redo work. If you're lazy, however, TFB.
-My school does reward carnivals and dances and other incentive things, and we take them away for students who misbehave.
CONTINUED....

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@caffeine_dude: I would probably have treated the situation the same way as your teacher did. As a teacher, you know who the bullies are, but there is little you can do about it. What I wouldn't give to see a kid stand up for himself the way you did some days! The first time it happened, probably nothing but a warning. However, if I saw you continue to do this, then you'd for sure be in trouble!

-@neuropsychosocial, I have given students hugs (and been hug-attacked by students). It's still fairly common. Kids today still need love and support! That being said, it's best to have witnesses, because there ARE horrible people in this world :/

When I was in HS (rural VA!) there was a rule in our handbook that allowed a rifle/shotgun to be kept in a student's vehicle, as long as it was in full view and unloaded. Never had a problem with anything other than fistfights.

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In Catholic school, I watched a nun discipline a kid by smacking him across the back with a yardstick. She hit him so hard that it broke in half, and then she yelled at the kid for making the school have to buy a new yardstick.

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Non-processed fresh food, handmade in the morning, placed in reheatable trays and reheated just in time for lunch. At least all through Elementary school.

Mac and Cheese, sammiches, pancakes, scrambled eggs, baked chicken...

My favorites were Fridays. A cheeseburger or pizza with chocolate milk.

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In grades 6-8, not only did the students bully me, but the teachers did too. I would hope this would not be allowed anymore.

Why did they bully me? Because I was smart, had a British accent from having lived in England for a year, and did not fit into their materialistic mold, being a daughter of two professors. Plus I could spell better than my first teacher, and I used to correct the words she'd give us for our spelling tests. So I guess that didn't help...

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@aafalke: You give out candy as a reward? As a fellow teacher, I recommend you rethink this. Not only is it contributing to poor eating habits, suppressing immune systems, possibly contributing to diabetes onset, and inhibiting student learning, but it is strengthening extrinsic motivation, which is a huge enough problem in our society today. I found this TED talk compelling. It may seem unrelated, but the message is universal.

http://www.ted.com/talks/sebastian_deterding_what_your_designs_say_about_you.html

As an alternative, why not praise the specific qualities you see in the student in that moment? That will be more strengthening for them in the long term. And for games, well, not sure if you want to reinforce the sense of gain and loss in them, but if you do, little trinkets might be better than candy. And they last longer.

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We also used to keep rifles in our vehicles during hunting season so we could go hunting after school. No big deal. A friend brought his Ruger Bearcat revolver to metal shop so he could machine some polished brass parts for it. The teacher verified it was unloaded, then let him proceed. This was at a small town high school in Oregon in the 70's.

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Second grade, talking to a friend in the next desk. Teacher picked us both up by our hair and slammed our heads together. Don't think that would fly today.

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@susanrm: Thank you for your post and your concern for our students! I agree that students can have poor eating habits. However, I give out candy as a sometimes treat. By no means is it given daily, or even weekly. Maybe once a month, as a random motivator. Yes, it is an extrinsic motivator, but we all are motivated by external factors at some point or another. Usually, I don't give rewards at all, but I do keep score and students get quite competitive, without any motivator from me! When I give out a treat, it's generally a surprise--I don't start the game by saying what (if any) reward there will be. I believe it is important to teach students the beauty of moderation in all things, and that it's ok to have treats every now and then. This is a much more successful model for eating than trying to altogether cut out a category of food from life! :)

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@aafalke: That's certainly better than what I was envisioning. But the school culture I come from does not allow anything but healthy snacks (fruits, veggies, etc.) and is developing its own organic community garden. Whatever we do with the students is a model of what we condone and what we think is "moral" - a more powerful teaching tool than anything we test them on. This includes whether we encourage competition or collaboration, among other things.

If you haven't seen the TED talk yet, I do recommend it - the speaker there says it better than I can.

Apparently, though, it is verboten in the deals.woot community to say anything against candy! Ha ha. People, you're supposed to be voting on whether it's a quality post or not, not whether you agree with it or not. Down-voting is for trolls, pure and simple - whereas this is a mature adult discussion.