questionswhat's your oldest tool in your house?

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If you count a blender, we still have the one from our wedding. 34 years ago next month. And yes, not only does it still work, we still use it.

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A scythe would probably be it (dates from 1890 or so). I also have a hay hook (looks rather like Captain Hook's hand, but attached at the end is a wood handle). That is from the fifties or so. Although most hay is now baled in those huge bales that need machinery to lift, grass hay (meant for horses, among others) is still baled the old fashioned way. Now I'm wondering how old the small pitchfork I use is...

I also have several egg beaters, and my favorite is from the late thirties. Sometimes the mechanical (non-electrical) tools are the very best.

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Can it be in the garage? My dad got his great-uncle's wooden tool chest and included tools when he and his siblings were dividing up my grandma's belongings after her passing. I don't know what all's in the tool chest, but there should be some pretty old stuff.

We used to have an antique cherry pitter, but my great-uncle borrowed it. He never returned it, and it was subsequently sold at his estate auction.

And until recently (read: 2 weeks ago) we had a still-working 39 1/2-years old Crockpot. It finally gave up the ghost.

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My great-grandfather was a stone mason and I have a few of his hand tools that date back to the 1920's.

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I also have a level that had been my great grandfather's. Made sometime around 1900.

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Mine. 57 years and still shines like new due to plenty of polishing...............

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Reason I asked was a few month ago I was visiting my parents and my mom took an electric hand mixer out of the cabinet, it's the one I remember her using as a kid and she told me she got it as a wedding present, 50 years ago. It runs like it is brand new.

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I have a set of clamps that my dad gave me when I was building my kitchen cabinets -- they belonged to his granddad back in the 20s (but I think they're much older than that). They span about 6 feet on a cast-iron frame and weigh about 40 lbs each.

I also have a bunch of hand tools that were left in my house when I bought it that are probably 50-60 years old.

The oldest tool I have is a wooden square. The measurements on it are mostly rubbed off but the date is still very legible: 1894 NYC. Oddly enough, it's still square and I've even used it a few times when I couldn't find my metal ones.

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I own my grandmother's manual typewriter tho its on loan now to family member. Works fine but the ribbon is pathetic. From the 40's perhaps?

My cousin has the family military saddle I think. Still usable. No horses tho.

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@f00l: You can still get ribbons for this. There's a local shop in my area that supplies such things (some people are fanatics about their typewriters). There's probably one in yours, too.

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The typewriter is in the house of a relative where it shows off as an antique. I will get her to search for new ribbons near her, might come in handy after the great electro-magnetic pulse. :)

I just remembered, she also has my treadle sewing machine. If a bobbin will fit it, I spoze it's also good to go.

Do swords count? The cousin who has the saddle has some family swords. Ceremonial I think. I supposed they could be used in the kitchen.... I last saw the swords and saddle when I was a kid. My grandfather had them then. I don't know the historical vintage or any stories of them.

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I have a set of wrenches I got when I was about 8 from a neighbor when he got a new set to replace them. So I'm guessing they were at least 15+ years old at the time, that would make them over 30 now.

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I have a meat grinder (hand-cranked) that's over 100 years old and still works well. I actually bought an electric one a few years ago but have never taken it out of the box. We also have a lot of things DH's family brought over from England in the late 1800's, but nothing that probably qualifies as a tool. The crib we used for our kids is actually a miniature baby bed that we can trace back to the early 1800's. We scraped over a dozen coats of paint off of it, sanded it down and refinished the wood. It's lovely! We gracefully refused to pass it on to DH's cousins after all of that work.

@mkentosh: My mother still uses the gleaming chrome toaster she received as a wedding present in 1954. They just don't make 'em like that anymore.

@f00l: Ooooh! A treadle? I would LOVE to have that! Those were gear-driven, unlike the fancy-schmancy electronic machines now! I need to sew some boat canvas and a regular belt-driven machine just can't handle it!

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Power Tools: Black & Decker U-124 , circa 1960's (?). Single speed, full metal casing. Also have a 40 yr old Craftsman table saw.

Things just are not made like this any more!

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I have couple of my father's or grandfather's handy me down files, pliers, saws, and bits, etc. They are, at least, 50 years old.

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I have a dibber that was brought over from County Cork in the 1800s. It still works just fine.

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Still use my dad's 50's vintage Estwig hammer. Can't swing it like he could, but it is the only one I can drive a nail reliably with. The wife has an old sickle and cradle in the barn, but it is no longer used.

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@belyndag: Never tried sewing with it. I am no mechanic, but the metal machine parts seem OK. The wooden cabinet part needs some glue and attention, but is OK if not bumped into. I don't even know if there is a needle in it, or where you would go find such things, if they can be bought. And bobbins....idont know if this machine was built as "real", or is a vintage repro or looks.

I would think it would be tough to sew leather or other strong or thick materials with it. Don't they make special machine for home users who do custom leather work? I got the idea that Tandy Leather still has a devoted customer base. What machine are those people using? What do they use in saddle and tack shops?

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A spoke shave, used for making wagon wheel spokes, belonged to my great-grandfather(my grandfather came to Texas in a wagon as a young child in 1890)..
Some jerk stole my anvil(also from my great-grandfather) a few years ago. I'd use stronger words, but it was 110 lb anvil, so it was evidently a large jerk.
Also have a ton of 1905-1920 traction engine tools, still use some of them.

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@f00l: They do make machines for sewing heavy materials (in our case it would be multiple layers of boat canvas), but they are HORRIBLY expensive and pretty much only sew a straight line. I guess I could justify the expense if it were a machine that did fancy things like monograms and serging and all that other stuff, but it's hard to wrap my mind around spending four figures on something that just sews a line. (sigh) OTOH it costs another fortune to pay someone else to do all of your canvas work, and this is a DIY boat restoration.

BTW, DH destroyed my good, solid Kenmore sewing machine repairing the sails on an earlier boat. It now costs more to REPAIR a sewing machine than it costs to buy a new one. Urgh!

Love the topic of old tools and appliances. I should have mentioned that I still have a GE hand mixer in 1960's avocado green I bought for a quarter at a neighbor's garage sale in the 70's. Until I got my big stand mixer it got a lot of use. Still works!

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@f00l: Your treadle sewing machine was probably made back in the day when people wore clothes that were made out of wool, and other protective fabrics. Before "repairing" it, please consider looking around for someone who specializes in such things. I expect it's a Singer; most surviving treadle sewing machines are. Any chance you could take a photo of the name plate, or other identifying marks?

I am now very curious. I still need more coffee to be conscious, though.

[Edit] They have special machines in saddle and tack shops, meant for sewing through thicknesses of leather. My daddy used to have one that he used for repairs to bridles and things. Actually, it's probably still out in the barn, or tack room, somewhere, as far as I know.

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I have an almost century old scythe. The blade is decently sharp, though it could use a new sharpening. It hasn't been used in years, but can be.

If you don't want to count that, I've got a couple of hand tool sets that are in the 50 - 60 year old range and are still used on a semi-regular basis.

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Don't know the age but I have my grandparent's reel mower. It's heavy! Has a wooden handle and connector pole (whatever you call it). I've never sharpened it but every time I've moved, I cut a patch in my yard. Still works great.

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I have an arrowhead that I estimate to be ridiculously old.

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@shrdlu: the basic table and iron and steel parts are fine. The smaller drawer have corner joins that are separating a bit. We will get experts opinion before any repairs. It does fine as eye candy right now.

Dont have pix or know brand.... perhaps later. It us a long drive from me, and its current person is spending extended time out of town with family. I bought it on a whim for a song at a garage sale, tho had no room and a camper on my couch at the time. Which is why it does not live with me.

It is lovely and v heavy due to the cast iron.

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@belyndag: if repairing sails is expensive, perhaps a saddle and tack shop or custom leather craftperson or a cobbler might do it, I know that anything involved with boats get pricy beyond reason.

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@shrdlu: the reason I thought of glue repairs.... its just the drawer corner I think. I once has a friend whom I've lost track of now, who made a living doing gorgeous custom carpentry, by hand tools if the customer requested. I was surprised that he used wood glue, since I know nothing of carpentry at all. He lectured me on the history of carpentry, joins, glue, etc, and afaik he knew his stuff.
I would attempt no repairs without reasonable research. I am as capable as any klutz with your basic duct tape, but have learned at least some of my limits with serious work.

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@f00l: Yup, we always note that you can take anything you would buy at your local hardware store, add the word "marine" into the title, and charge three times as much for it.

Now that I think of it, we have the original ax that George Washington used to cut down the cherry tree. It's a great ax and we still use it occasionally. We've only had to replace the handle three times and the head twice..........

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I have 2 Craftsman Table saws manufactured in the early 1950s..
Some wooden handled hand tools..

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I have a hand crank drill that is probably 80+ years old.

When I moved out, my step father gave me a brown paper bag of old hand-me-down tools. A fraternity brother in college asked me why on earth I would keep that drill. I told him, "you never know". Less than a month later someone had a brilliant idea at 2am of attaching a little metal pocket to the side of the entertainment center that was just inside the door in the fraternity house. That way whoever brought in the mail would have a place to put it that everyone would see as they came in the house. The only problem was how to drill holes at 2am without waking up the house. When I came out of my room with that drill, the guys had looks of awe like I was some kind of mix of MacGuyver and Batman.

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Solid cherry wood clamp great-grandfather-in-law (if there is such a thing) brought from Germany in the late 1880s. It's more artwork than tool nowadays, and my woodworking friends all think it's cool.

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I also have what is purported to be a petrified deer heart that was brought over from Ireland in the 1880s. It is in a custom made box and was supposedly used as a knife sharpening stone. How one can tell that it is a petrified deer heart is beyond me as it simply looks like a rock in a box.

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I have a hand saw that I got from my father-in-law. He said his father used to use it when he was young. That would put it from the 1920's.