questionswhat the heck are used legos?

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According to the FAQ, an item sold in Warehouse Deals that is "Like New" such as the one you linked to should be in perfect operating condition, but with damage to the packaging.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?ie=UTF8&docId=1000656811

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At Comicon they have these life sized figures and dioramas made of Legos in the exhibit hall. I always wondered what happened to them after the convention. A couple of the ones I photographed:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/20261001@N08/6054814353/in/set-72157627461997428
http://www.flickr.com/photos/20261001@N08/6054826541/in/set-72157627461997428

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Legally, if the package has been opened (even if they were opened to damage sustained during shipping), they can no longer sell them as new. Even if all the tidbits are in tact and there is no damage to the item itself, it has to be listed as either refurbished or used.

Warehouse deals has some great prices on all sorts of stuff. Most of the time, you'll save 30% just for letting someone else break the seal for you.

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I agree with capguncowboy. I've made a few purchases of Amazon Warehouse items and every time, the items have been brand new, but had the original packaging opened at some point. Can be a great deal if you find one available.

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Jumping on the Warehouse bandwagon. We've used them a ton and have never once been disappointed. From a Kinect (with free three games included) at half of normal price, a 47" tv that was pristine for the price of a 37" , and more. You just have to watch the listings, as they go quick, and find "like new" and READ the item's description/condition. Plus if it is foul I have the amazing AMAZON (unless it is about Woot) to back me up!

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Used Legos paid for more than half of one of my round trip flights from Brazil to the states. Sold the majority of my collection, keeping my favorites that I wanted to pass to my kids....I was pretty pumped that someone was willing to drop $500 on it :)

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@dmaz: I have legos I am ready to sell, do I make sure to separate by kit if I can? Example kits I have HP Spiderman pirates.

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First thing I thought of when I saw this question was the ones at Goodwill sold by the pound or box.

http://www.shopgoodwill.com/viewItem.asp?ItemID=12357849

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@moondrake: The Jack-Sparrow Lego-Statue (Legtue?) reminds me of Money Island

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@caffeine_dude: check craigslist, in a big city, for "lego".

after scanning past all the lego video games, you'll see how used legos sell. Some sets are worth selling as the original set if all/most of the pieces are there, some may be better to sell by weight. Some hard-to-find mini figs or pieces may be best to sell individually.

Also check ebay listings for used legos to get an idea of the marketplace. Beware of the scammers on craiglsist looking to take advantage of lego sellers by underpaying for them. They'll often use some heartwarming story about helping schools or their own kid working on some lego project.

Also don't overprice your legos, be reasonable, after all, they are used.

Finally, let me know what, exactly, you have that you want to sell. My kids and I are lego fanatics. I still own my childhood legos from 35 years ago!

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@capguncowboy: You say legally if the package has been opened, they can no longer sell the item as new.

Can you show me the law that covers that. You did say legally so I am assuming you mean there's a law that says you cannot do it.

The reason I ask, is that I've worked the beginning of my life in the retail sector and I have sold thousands of display items and opened box items as new. It was standard practice. Even if a customer returned something because they changed their mind or didn't like the product, we would sell the item to another customer.

All the prices were the same regardless if we sold a brand new never touched item, a display unit, a customer return, or an item without a box. I do not believe a company as large as the one I worked for would have it as standard practice to sell things like that if it were illegal.

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@cengland0: Whether it's strictly legal or not, I consider it unethical and poor customer service to sell a display item or floor model anything as new. Both of them are likely to have a lot of use, dings, soil, and other minor damage. I've bought discounted floor model items in the past, when the discount made it worth overlooking the obvious usage damage, but I'd be PO'd if it was sold as new.

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@magic cave: You may be right that it's unethical but I don't believe it's illegal like @capguncowboy stated.

I have personally demonstrated products then the customer says they will buy one. I look for one in the back room and cannot find one. So I get the empty box and tell the customer the display unit that I just demonstrated is the last one and I can sell them that one. They say yes and I sell it for the same price. I have never, ever, under any circumstances discounted an item for this reason. It was against corporate policy to do so. Therefore, I had to conclude it was legal to sell an open item as new.

We had thousands of stores so this was not a small operation. Even our stores in Hawaii had to sell for the same price even though the freight there cost more.

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I have bought many items at radio shack after they were opened for examination at my request by a salesperson. I always paid full price.

However, if an item was an open box or display I would expect a discount. Same thing if an item had been taken home by a customer or shipped out to a customer and then returned opened.

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@cengland0: i think your use of the term "sold as new" is not the same as the way @capguncowboy is using it. he is saying that you can't advertise or display an open box item in a manner that mite fool an unsuspecting customer into thinking that the item is new, not that it can't be sold at full price. if a salesperson opens a box in front of a prospective customer, there is a reasonable expectation that that person knows the box was just opened. otherwise, items on the shelf that have been returned ought to be labeled "open box" or "used" or similar. They can still be sold at full price, though.

just my opinion, i have no facts to back this up.

no1 no1
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@no1: You might be right that you cannot advertise a product as new when it has been used; however, if the box was damaged or opened during shipment, you still can. That was specifically stated that you cannot and that's where we disagree. I would probably be honest and say "New item with damaged box" or something similar.

I was planning on buying a bunch of products from a friend that is closing their business on the 31st. His lease is running out and he will have inventory of unsold products. I plan to sell these on eBay as brand new -- never used. But first, I will open each one of them to take pictures of the products. I will then carefully put them back into the original boxes. I seriously doubt there is any law on the books anywhere that forces me to sell them as used items now that I've opened those boxes to take pictures of them. Now way, no how. If someone can prove me wrong, I will eat that crow but until then, I'm going to say it's totally legal.

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@cengland0: A google search shows that it is illegal to sell a "used" item as "new." However, it appears that there is no uniform standard for "used" and it may vary depending on the item. For example, if a car has been titled in someone's name and returned to the dealer, it must be sold as "used." Some stores appear to sell any returned electronic as "open box" or "used"; others appear to use their judgment. In the situation you're describing, you're the seller, so opening the box doesn't make the item "used." However, according to ebay, it makes the item "new, other see details" rather than "new."

@capguncowboy's description of Amazon Warehouse standards is spot-on; I noticed their use of conditional verb tenses ("a coffee maker might have been removed from its original packaging and the previous customer may have tried to make coffee").