questionswe just adopted a cat from a shelter - any advice?

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No advise, just a good luck with the new cat and kudos to you for going to a shelter... all of our animals have either been strays or shelter rescues and we couldn't be happier...

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I've adopted cats from shelters & never thought to confine them to one room. My cats have never liked confining in any way, so I find the one room biz odd.

I do know that when I got my 2nd cat it was contrary to the advice of my local shelter, believe it or not. I'd mentioned that my cat #1, an indoor/outdoor cat, was not exactly friendly to neighborhood cats. The shelter personnel told me that in that case I shouldn't get a 2nd, since some cats don't like sharing space. In the end I disagreed with them & took a 2nd cat anyway. All went well, though there was an adjustment period.

To make a long story short, I learned not to believe everything the shelter folks tell me & look to common sense first. I say, trust your instincts and, ofcourse, bring the cats to their annual vet visits.

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@pamfenway: Thanks for the reply. The one room is just until the cat is a bit adjusted to the new space - they told us he was very shy at the shelter, and, indeed, he was hiding in the furthest part of his cage there. But when they brought him into the meeting room, he was friendly and came to us right away, so I am sure he will get used to us soon. @tarasadies: thanks for your reply as well. I was very happy to see the shelter was very busy today - we saw 3 other animals being adopted while we were there.

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Did you thoroughly clean the house after the other pets fell ill and passed? It would be terrible to pass whatever they had to the new cat.

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@spellshock: Thanks for thinking of that. The cats died of different types of cancer and the dog died from what looked like heart failure or a seizure. Nothing catchy, luckily. But a very good thought - we scrubbed up everything for the newcomer so he will have clean blankets and dishes and such!

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If there's no history for him don't forget to get him checked out by the vet and get him his shots.

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@panthiest: We definitely will! He got some shots at the shelter and is neutered, but we will need to get his rabies vaccine, at least. I'm planning to call our vet tomorrow, although I'm not sure if they are open. But we will get him there this week.

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i'd say just give him time and be nice, scratch his cheeks, talk softly to him, etc. one of mine was very very scared of everything. when i first got him from my parents, even though he loved eating, he didn't come out of a corner in the closet. i pushed food close to him so he wouldn't have to come out. they had free reign and eventually he started roaming with his brother cat, occasionally still hiding under the bed when i came home. he's not shy or jumpy anymore but it took awhile. now they both run to me when i come home from work and follow me around the house

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@caron7: Gotcha. Best of luck & enjoy your new family member! Nice to hear the shelter is getting a lot of adoptions!

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I, too, adopted an adult cat from the animal shelter. He was given up by an older lady, who could no longer take care of him. He spent the first 4 or 5 days with us, hiding behind the washer and dryer. We set his food and water on the floor within his reach and just gave him some time to "think about things". After he figured out that we were "okay", he decided to check out the rest of the house. He's been with us for 12 years.

I'm sure you're new kitty will soon be purring away on your lap. Good luck!

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@katblue: thanks for sharing your story - glad everything worked out so well for you! He is already starting to warm up to us a little and will come over for a scratch. He certainly can purr!

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Take it back and get a dog?

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If you've gotten a purr, you're 99% of the way there! I did the one room thing with my cat too, and he seemed to appreciate the privacy. I left the door closed at first because when I came in the room, he would run under the dresser again. Eventually left the door open a little, and let him get used to the new sounds.

Same as yours, he eventually let me scratch his neck, and then he was a purr monster. Wasn't too long after that that he was making himself cozy on my bed! Sounds like you've done everything right - congrats on your new family member!

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Thanks so much for rescuing your new family member from the shelter! If only more people would do this, and would spay and neuter their pets, there would be many fewer sad stories about unwanted cats and dogs.

There are some wonderful suggestions here, and I would only add one: I suggest that you get down on the floor at his level occasionally. Most pets find their humans to be much more approachable when we are down at their level. We rescued some very timid kitties a few months back, and needed to socialize them before placing them in forever homes. It finally dawned on me to just sit on the floor, at their level, and wait patiently. Before I knew it, I had a lap full of happy cats. It broke the ice.

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Oh, and if you've followed any of the BOC followup discussions over on the main Woot! site, you will know that if you leave an open box anywhere, a cat will eventually appear in it. So if your new kitty disappears under a table or bed, just leave an empty Woot! box open somewhere nearby, and your cat will show up in it sooner or later.

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I've had plenty of vets and shelter workers say that introducing the cat to one room at first helps with adjustment. You're doing right there. Once the cat gets acclimated with the one room, it'll be fine. Hiding is to be expected. Give him lots of treats, let him associate you with pleasure. And give him high places that he can climb and observe the room, cats love that.

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@rwinfi2019: @belyndag: @msuanduga: thanks, all. He is just so cute that it is almost too hard for everyone to wait him out a bit. The kids have agreed to take individual short shifts of sitting in with him and talking gently or just being there, although they all want to be there at once. He gets a long break in between. So far, he alternates between the covered litter box, the carrier and the bed, (which is an improvement already). And, great suggestion, an empty woot box will have to be one of his first toys!

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@caron7: @caron7: First let me tell you I'm sorry about your pest dying. I know how you feel. They really get into you heart.

I would think one of the most important things, (besides loving him), is, as someone else said, taking your cat to a vet for a complete checkup.

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@caron7: I am so sorry that I misspelled pets as pest. Please accept my apology.

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@jnissel: Thanks for the heartfelt words, even with the typo, your message came through.

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Lots of patience and congratulations! =^.^=

Also to help you out I tagged this as "cats" so you can easily find lots of other great cat threads that have come up: http://deals.woot.com/questions/tagged/cats (There are so many bits of good advice in those too on a wide range of kitty topics.)

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@inkycatz: thanks inkycatz! Love your cat emoticon. I think we just have to wait him out and see how he adjusts to us. But he came home on doxycycline, so I may have to fish him out of the carrier in awhile to give him his daily dose. With a treat, of course!

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@caron7: I have some lysine chews I need to give my cat once in a while. She thinks they are treats though because I treat them as such and it makes it so much easier. (Perhaps you can put the medicine in a pill pocket?)

Her immunity system is not the world's best, which I didn't know when I got her - I would have gotten her anyway because she's adorable. I do love my shelter kitty!

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@inkycatz: They gave me liquid doxy, and he was pretty good about taking it. I was more nervous than he was. Pill pockets are awesome. Although our last cat would take them for a few weeks and then turn her nose up at them until we changed flavors. We now own some of every flavor!