questionscan i hand drywall on 2"x2" studs?

vote-for17vote-against
vote-for5vote-against

The 2x2 would hold for walls, but there is a reason to have a thicker wall ... and that is for insulation. You're not going to get even R13 in there without some 2x4 framing.

If there's any signs of moisture penetration when the paneling is off, STOP and take care of that with whatever means are necessary. Covering it up is just asking for trouble in the future.

vote-for3vote-against

Drywall is no longer made as sturdy as it was 10 years ago. I would do it right the first time around. Rough in 2x4 studs. Drywall over that. You would experience bowing at the slight exposure of dampness, and that could be a typical summer. Remember to let your roughed in studs hang out for a week before drywall. Studs will adjust to the temp and humidity of your house and "pretzel" or bend if they are lousy pieces. You don't want them to bend up while attached to drywall (you'll end up with nail pops in 1 week)

vote-for2vote-against

@narfcake: good point about insulation, forgot about that.

vote-for2vote-against

@narfcake: Good point, but I'm not planning on doing insulation. It's a fully buried basement and it stays pretty warm already, so I'm not too concern. You're also right about moisture. There's carpeting now and I don't see any spotting, so I'm hoping it's well sealed still. But, I will be making sure to seal any cracks that may be there. There is a coating on it now and I don't expect any holes though.

@mellielou: I'm taking the project slow, so a week won't be a problem if decide to add 2x4 studs. Thanks.

vote-for2vote-against

@mellielou: What about screwing and Liquid Nailing 2x2 studs on the existing studs? I'd get the rigidity and save on reframing those walls.

vote-for3vote-against

having done this same project in my sister's basement-you want 2x4 studs instead of 2x2 so you can run electrical outlets/wires. most code requires the wire to run in the center of 2x4 so nails wont peirce the wiring. remember that putting in to many at current time is easier than trying to add later. and there is always a "why are all the outlets so far away" factor.

insulation isn't just about warmth/cool factor. we did it as a sound deadening helper.

vote-for3vote-against

@jeffrjohn: Aside from the possible moisture issue, 2x2's can fully support sheetrock (think pocket doors before they made metal frames for them). I would think that you could leave the existing framework in place with no problems, if you were really worried about buckling and twisting you could always put a 1/4 shim behind each stud (near the middle) and fasten it to the wall through the shim with a tapcon or other fastener.

Also, you could still insulate the walls if you stuck with the 2x2's, spray foam is a great option.

Lastly, is removing the paneling absolutely necessary? There are no rules that I know of against sheetrocking over paneling. That would save you a bunch of time and you would only be gaining rigidity. Heck, it seems to be the way they did it in my house.

vote-for2vote-against

@moosezilla: If I ran the wiring in the floor joists above and dropped down to the outlets, would that meet code? I do plan on putting quite a few outlets in as well as built in lit display cases for sports memorabilia. 2x4 studs would make the cases more flush to the wall, which is a benefit.

vote-for2vote-against

@jeffrjohn: the liquid nails idea sounds like an awful lot of work to me...and LN isn't that cheap.

vote-for2vote-against

@jeffrjohn: Running the wires down the walls should meet code, but it would use up a lot more wire and junction boxes than going through the studs.

vote-for2vote-against

@stupimlico: I could still use the outlet box for splitting the wire and just run them in series, unless that's a no-no. It would be extra wire though for sure, but cheaper than the cost of 30 or so 2x4 studs. I admit, electrical is not my strong suit. I'll be calling in an electrician friend for that work. I need my breaker box replaced anyway since it's old and I'd like to expand it to more breakers considering the extra power I'll be using in the basement and the fact I'd like to split of some current lines that trip every now and then.

vote-for3vote-against

@jeffrjohn: I don't have a copy of the NEC (National Electric Code) here at home, but you may need AC (armored) instead of NM (Romex) wiring, adding some significant expense in the wiring aspects.

I can say that with only 1-1/2" of depth to work with on a 2x2, you will find that the box fill becomes a major issue. 2 cu.in per 14 ga. wire, 10 cu.in per device ... any thing wired in a series will need at least a 22 cu.in box - and those are almost always deep boxes.

vote-for3vote-against

As long as the 2x2's are secure to the wall go ahead and use them. If you decide you need thicker studs you can actually secure them to the existing 2x2's sideways. The biggest problem you are going to have is with your outlet boxes sticking out of the thinner wall.

If you really want sheet-rock, you can certainly mount that to the existing panelling. Another thought is to simply paint or wallpaper the panelling which would minimize your work and cost since you are going to have to that to the sheet-rock anyway. If you were planning a splatter finish, you could do that to the existing pannelling as well. One could also install the wiring in decorative conduit or baseboard.

vote-for2vote-against

@jeffrjohn: I'm sure your electrician friend will be able to tell you the best way to run things. And it will surely be code worthy work. At least I hope so. :-)

All of this trying to figure it out...I should just say that I am a huge fan of the technique of "Tear it all out and start over", cause honestly, it's so much easier and you really avoid a whole lot of headaches.

vote-for3vote-against

@jeffrjohn: whereas thru the ceiling/floor is will work and is an nec approved method, it also very fustrating and costly to do. realize that every 16 to 24 inches that the wire must be secured. whether you use a wiring staple (just buy the big tub to begin with, you will need more than you think) or a whole thru middle of 2x4 is mostly a difference in "can i afford more for wire and staples or for time and enegry?"

also if you plan to use an electrician-get him/her in on it before you decide. they might have a preference with a lot of reasoning we can't see thru the internet. they would also know local codes better. because most of national electric code states that it's "this or whatever your local laws are." (illinois has a law that states bedrooms must be on a certain type of breaker which isn't listed in nec.)

vote-for2vote-against

@jeffrjohn: if you plan on pulling permits,do 2x4. As for liq nails, sure you could go that route, but i'd ladder the 2x2's (add horizontal pieces between studs) for rigidity and add an additional surface for liq nails.