questionswhere were you 11 years ago today?

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Oh, wow. My comment was deleted. I can only assume because it was sarcastic. Imagine that--sarcasm on Woot. Well, if that one ticked you off, wait'll you get a load of the winner question I have lined up for tonight!

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At primary school. Hope for world peace.

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Enroute to work, Pearl Harbor Navel Station. Remember, Hawaii is many hours behind NY. So it was very early morning for me. Probably ~6am. First thing I noticed was that the base was locked down and traffic was at a stand still. I had no clue what was going on. Cars were trickling in. About 7:30am, I got through the gate and was able to get onto my ship where I was made aware of the situation. Within 15 minutes, my ship went to general quarters due to some unresponsive planes in the air. Two other ships pulled lines and got underway immediately. I spent the next 48 hours on the ship (no big deal) before they worked out a 1/2 and 1/2 watch rotation. Half the ship leaves for 24 hours, comes back and switches places with the other half. Did that for a few weeks, then moved into a 3 section watch rotation. Sat that way for months.

Though slightly inconvenient, it was nothing. I spend months at a time aboard the ship. I'd do it all again three times over given the same situation.

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In high school. And "celebrating" my 18th birthday...

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I was also in high school, living 1 hour south of Boston, so 6 hours north of NYC. It was first period, in a very small school, which started at 8 am. It was my senior year in high school, I was 17.

The period never finished. The principle walked in and explained that a plane had hit one of the world trade towers in NYC, and that the TV in the lobby was on the news and that we were welcome to watch. No one knew yet, that the first plain was intentional and that there was a second plane on the way.

My classmates and I stood there, for what seemed like and eternity, but had only been 45-60 minutes. In that time the second plane hit the second tower, and we all watched it. All the freshmen through to the seniors. And then, the unthinkable happened. The first tower collapsed. We all stood there in shock, and awe. Then time seemed to speed up, and before we knew it the second tower fell. I remember thinking, all of us at such a young age, just witnessed the death of thousands of people.

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My little brother came running upstairs saying a building was on fire somewhere... I had no idea the building was THAT BIG. It didn't really hit until my first hour geometry class with Mrs. Schultz's in the 9th grade... wow, some vivid pictures.

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@matasar: "...wishing so hard ambulance sirens would come, and they just never came." That's an interesting perspective on the day and the events that happened. It makes sense. But just drives home again more of the tragedy of the day.

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Working as a resident at Columbia Presbyterian in New York. I'd been on call the night before, and was doing my morning work after the all-nighter when the planes hit. We could see the smoke from the rooftop, even though we were up at the northern tip of Manhattan. The hospital scrambled like I'd never seen, we literally emptied out the ICU of anyone not on death's door and discharged everyone from the hospital who didn't absolutely need to be in the hospital, desperate to make room for all of the injured survivors. And they never came. I remember how sad we all were, I stayed despite zero sleep, and remember just sitting on the stoop in the ambulance bay outside the ER, that blue blue sky we had, wishing so hard ambulance sirens would come, and they just never came.

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I was sitting in my elementary school classroom. We were having carpet time. My teacher got up when the room phone rang. After she answered, her face became very grave and closed off as if she had heard something terrible. It turns out that she had heard some bad news, some very bad news. Then parents started coming to pick up my classmates. Soon it was my turn to go home. I didn't really understand what had happened until later.

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@rebeljean55:
A miracle happened that day. Not a single cloud over the North American continent. The only planes that crashed were the hijacked ones. Can you imagine landing all those planes in bad conditions? Some of those planes landed on jam-packed runways or runways considered short for the plane. There was no margin for error.

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I was a long haul trucker then and was parked at the company terminal in Forest Park, Georgia, just south of Atlanta. I was in my semi and heard some talk on the CB radio, so I turned on my tv in time to see the first tower collapse. Was glued to the tv the rest of the day - the terminal was located close to the airport landing flight path, so we constantly saw pairs of jets coming in to land.... then all flights were grounded... still amazes me that no commercial jets flew anywhere in the country for a few day. In my travels around the country after that day I saw how we Americans bonded and came together to appreciate what we have and reached out to help those in need.

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I remember looking out at the sky that night. I could usually see a string of planes on approach to Atlanta. Not that night . . . completely empty sky.

And oh yeah, I also learned later that the airport RIGHT NEXT TO MY HOUSE (Briscoe Field in Lawrenceville, GA) was where Mohamed Atta got his pilot's training. Pretty scary $%#@

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@xarous: I wish I could +1 you more than once.

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Usually I don't get the news first in my household as my target audience works at a newspaper. That day she had a day off and was home with my youngest brother, who'd moved in with us. I was due at the theatre for a rehearsal. Walked into the building and there was an air of attention, a gravity, everyone clustered, listening to the radio. I heard "Logan Airport" and started worrying about my sister and her family in Boston. Then I figured out what was going on, called home to wake people up and let them know what had happened. It was very difficult to explain to a half asleep person, the scale of the disaster being something no one wants to have imagined.

I remember being very glad the people I loved were somewhere safe and heart wrecked at the thought of those who didn't have that comfort.

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I was in college. I woke up to see the second plane hit & a little bit of news coverage. I listened to what I could before I had to go to class ( the teacher had a 'you better be dead if you miss my class' attitude ). All of us students showed up & were in class for about 20 minutes before they cancelled classes for the day.

I ended up spending most of the rest of my day with a few friends that lived in NYC, one of which had relatives that worked within a half block of the towers. ( he later found out that she was fine ).

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I was on my planning period with about 20 mins left before my 6th Grade class showed up when the first plane hit.

I watched the TV in my classroom, got an email from an assistant principal (addressed to the whole staff) telling us not to have our TVs on because "kids do not need to deal with this."

Yeah, we all left our TVs on the entire day and watched it when the kids arrived. We all knew they were going to be dealing with it whether that AP liked it or not.

edit: Several Wooters said THEY were in 6th Grade in 2001. Weird.

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I was at my apt, on my way to work. Spent the next few hours trying to find out any status on my father. Luckily he was fine. He spend the day bussing people from lower Manhattan to uptown.

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I was working in Reston, VA at our offices for the week (I'm from the NYC area) and I actually got in early that day. As people came in I heard more from the radio reports. Our boss sent someone to Target to get an antenna for the TV we had in the Lab.
We were glued to the screen until the first tower fell...then the second...
That's when all the local guys in the office went home and came back armed. No one knew what was happening or what to expect, but they were going to be ready.

The phone lines were jammed so I couldnt call my parents in NY to tell them I was ok, but I sent an e-mail that they read a day or two later. (I was able to get through that night).

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I was painting my house. I walked in to drink a pop and turned on the TV, the first plane had hit, I sighed and said oh, that is too bad.
I came in a few hours later and saw a 2nd plane had hit, I only watched it for a few seconds. At the time thought it was some sort of plane to put out the fire that got too close.

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In my eighth grade science class. Mrs. Rose came into the class and informed us of what happened. She said "Something terrible has happened." I remember a TV being wheeled into the classroom so that we could watch what happened. I didn't really understand how huge this event was at the time. It was also my friend's birthday and I remember having steaks and burgers at his place after school and walking by the TV to see that the coverage was on every channel.

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Standing outside when my brother (who was listening to a hockey game) came out and told us what happened. We immediately went over to our grandpas house to see what was happening.

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Waking up to my sister's voice on the answering machine saying "Turn on the TV as soon as you get up." I had worked overnight, taken her son to preschool for her, and was crashed on her couch. I turned on the tv, and saw the second plane hit. The sound was off, and I remember thinking "That is going to be an awesome movie!" I hit the volume button to find out it was reality. The rest of the day was like a bizarre episode of Teletubbies where it kept playing again and again. I couldn't look away or turn it off, because as soon as I did, it was going to real and everything was going to change.

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I had turned on the tv to get the weather while I tied my shoes. Saw the smoke coming out of the WTC, thought "(profanity), stupid idiot" then watched as the second plane hit the other tower and horrified, couldn't think a word. I went on to catch my vanpool, we listened on our way to work and heard the 3rd plane hit the Pentagon. Watched the towers come down, nobody was working. Some of the old guys were muttering about "glass parking lots". It took me a couple minutes to realize they were talking about Nuking the middle east. Saw the towers come down and we were sent home. It was wierd, no planes in the sky. We're on the flight path to Seattle. For the next six months security was tight.

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6th grade home room. Watched it, not exactly understanding what was going on, but I knew it wasn't good.

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I live in Arizona and was working nights at the time, so it was early (I think it was 6 am) thus I was fast asleep. My wife called me way early from work and told me to turn on the TV. I stayed and watched all day

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I was in El Salvador on a mission trip. I went to eat breakfast with a family we knew and they told us that someone was blowing up the USA. Thankfully they had a small TV and we were able to watch in utter disbelief. It didn't seem nearly as real since I wasn't in the states. Many of the locals were telling us how sorry they were for weeks after.

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Sixth grade, lunch time. We were talking/ celebrating a friend's birthday, when people start leaving the school in masses, their parents picking them up. Word was that there was a bomb threat to the school, among other ideas but that was the most prevalent. My dad picked me up shortly after. Being so young the gravity of the situation didn't really set in right away, but my parents and I watched the news all day

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Sitting at my desk when my husband called to tell me the first plane had struck. We thought it was a bizarre accident at first, but I dashed up to the CEO's office to tell him to turn on the only TV in the building. A handful of us stayed there to watch the second plane crash. Like everyone else, that's when we realized that it wasn't just as accident. I wanted desperately to pick up my kids from their schools and take them home to just hug them, but the CEO sent the Directors back to our work areas to calm our people. Of course, we all spent the rest of the day following events on the internet, talking to our families by phone, and milling around crying. Still hard to believe.

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Just got done with my morning class at GT, then ran home to get my stuff to go to work. My wife called me on the phone and told me about a plane crashing into the WTC. I turned on CNN and saw the second plane hit.
Left Atlanta, started driving to my job in Stone Mountain. I remember driving down North Ave, looking at the BoA Tower, being terrified that something would happen while I was driving past.
Everyone in the office had their TVs on. The first tower fell while I was on my way. Got to work just in time to see the second tower fall.
Needless to say, I didn't get much done that day.
I remember Scott Slade from WSB Radio was on the air for 36 hours straight as more details kept coming out about the story. I think the news director had to force him to go home.

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My wife's 21st birthday was 11 years ago today. We were suppose to fly out to Vegas the next day but of course that didn't happen. We ended up driving out there to meet up with her family. The drive was eerily desolate, no one was on the roads. It was a very somber trip. Everyone was was stuck in Vegas because all the flights had been cancelled. All the car rental places were price gouging because people had no other way to get home. All the massive televisions in all the casinos played news 24 hours a day......Never Forget

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I was driving to work at Edwards Air Force Base outside LA. I got the first news from the car radio as I pulled onto the highway. Both towers had been hit. There were reports of a bomb at the Pentagon and fires on the Mall in DC.
When I got to base the young Marines at the gate who work BDUs and maybe a sidearm the day before were in full battle dress. A military truck with a manned, roof mounted machine gun was parked just inside the gate.
Not long after I got to my building the base closed. Everyone was required to stay in the building they were in. We got some news from the radio (running the CNN audio). Our coworkers who were in another building for a brief didn't even have that. One called me not long after the first tower fell. He didn't even know the second tower had been hit.
We were able to get off base around noon. I went home, turned on the tv and saw the images for the first time. I called my Mom and my sister. I had been in California about two weeks. I felt very alone.

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I was on active duty with the Air Force and on my way (on leave) to my brother's wedding. Spent a lot of time contacting my unit to validate I wasn't being recalled.

While the wedding was a great time, it was certainly overshadowed by what happened that week...and was still unfolding on Saturday.

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Home with my little kids, watching the Today Show like I did every morning. Then they had breaking news that a plane had crashed into one of the towers. And then coverage of a second crash. It was beyond surreal. Then the coverage of the towers falling -- beyond belief. I called my husband at work to tell him the towers were gone, and he couldn't fathom it either. He kept saying, "What do you mean, gone?".

I remember walking outside a bit later with my infant in my arms, talking to neighbors who were gathering outside. I remember how eerie the sky was, with no planes anywhere. And then out of nowhere, one plane flanked by two fighter jets. We surmised it must have been the president heading back to Washington.

We couldn't get in touch with my brother-in-law who lived in New York. He worked nights and turns out he slept through all the commotion and television coverage. He called us when he woke up, wanting to know what was going on.

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It was just a typical day at work when I heard the news. We spent most of the day in a fog watching the news on tv and the internet.

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School. It happened while we where switching classes.
My friend came running in the classroom screaming "TURN ON THE T.V.!"

Watched just after the second plane hit and then the first tower collapse. I was out of school after that to go to work. The roads where eerily empty. Work was dead, everyone just watching the news. I watched gas prices jump 3 times that day.

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On a business trip to Minneapolis. My alarm went off and I turned on the TV to see the second plane hit the WTC. Everyone in the hotel went downstairs and sat together staring at the TV. We were supposed to fly home that day. We ended up "borrowing" our rental car and drove home listening to the radio all the way.

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Getting ready to head into the office with the TV on, as the second plane hit it dawned on me that my sister, a flight attendant, was flying that day. She regularly flew out of Newark. Called mom to ask where my sister was flying from, she said Logan international, I told her to turn on the TV and I headed for my parents house(nearby), we waited for my sister to call us and let us know she was alright. She called, they had departed Logan en route to DFW, but FAA made them land in Memphis. She spent the next 3 days in Memphis. As soon as US airspace was open, her company asked her fly back into Newark so that they could get people out. It really shook her up flying in and the buildings not being there and all the smoke in their place. I visited NY in December of that year, started walking from the empire state bldg towards ground zero, stopping a fire stations along the way, it was an intensely emotional experience.

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I was in my high school Army JROTC classroom and watched it all. Being right there in uniform watching it made it all the more real.

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Not watching a rerun.

And waking up to watch the news before walking to school and seeing the towers. (profanity) was weird at school, especially when none of the teachers would talk about it. I mean like the principal told all the teachers to not discuss it even though we all knew it was going on. Stupid magnet.

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I was at work and my wife was at the doctor confirming what she already knew...we were expecting our 2nd child

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I was taking my grad qualifying exam and the school decided not to tell us what was going on and interrupt the exam or they would have to re-administer the test. We came out and went to our designated classes and I remember there being an eerie silence as we walked the halls when typically you could hear some noise from the gym or teachers in their classrooms. We got to the class and our Spanish teacher met us at the door. She was speechless and in tears...She led us into the room and pointed up to the little TV that was mounted on the wall as she sobbed and went back to her little office. We filed in slowly and saw all the other upperclassmen and freshman watching in disbelief. We spent the rest of the day watching the news...I will never forget.

My thoughts and prayers go out to all the families that were impacted by 9/11

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Getting ready for a blind date. ugh. Went on the date and all we talked about was what was going on. We never dated again and never saw each other again.

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I was where I'll never be again. At 9:03am, realizing that what happened at 8:46 wasn't an isolated accident, the world I lived in was transformed.

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glances at the clock Exactly 11 years ago? In an ENTIRELY different world than this one.

A couple hours from now? Way different story. I worked a late shift, so I was actually in bed when the phone rang. A friend was calling to say a plane had just smashed into the WTC. I told her that wasn't very funny, she insistently told me to turn on the TV, so I did...

...right in time to see the second plane.

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I was waking up on the couch. I had been release from the hospital hours before in a bustling part of Missouri. The night before I had went down in a fire, my whole team did, due to a wacko trying to blow-up the maintenance bay of the neighboring police station (and their dispatch with it). He had loaded his car with real nasty stuff. The fire was so intense it melted half the building. My team and I had drawn the short straw and got that side of the build.

So yeah, groggily I had awakened. My sister had stayed with me when I was finally released and she was crying watching the tv. I saw the first tower go down and it all was a blur from there. The next day we started pulling extra firefighters in to go to NYC to help. In all we sent twelve men. I couldn't get cleared to go. As I was still suffering from heat stroke and exhaustion. It was ...something... to see firefighters just like me go down and not get back up.

Always running in while everyone is running out.

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I too was in study hall in high school when it happened, I remember the teachers in study hall turning on the radio and thinking "how rude"(since I was actually trying to get some work done) until I started listening to what they were saying on the radio. At first I thought it was some kind of joke, but the details were too real. The teacher of my next class's son worked in the Pentagon, so she was distraught and had to leave, so we just watched the news on TV. For the remainder of the day, all we did was talk about everything that happened. One teacher even remarked "you'll remember where you were and what you were doing on this day for the rest of your lives". True story.

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Sitting in the waiting room of an outpaient surgery center, waiting for my then gf. She was completely unhinged before her procedure, so there was no TV or radio before I got to the waiting area. I think that at least one aircraft had hit, maybe the second hit as I got there.

I remember that people became completely unhinged for the months following. Security required ID before entering, well, anywhere. What that was supposed to do: I have no idea. All 11 hijackers passed through security with (for the most part) valid U.S. driver's licenses.

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At work, watching on a small TV. We were watching the aftermath of the first plane, as the second one came in and struck. IT still gives me chills thinking about it.

As with @capitalggeek, I remember getting a huge amount of speculation that later turned out to be wrong.

Thoughts out to everyone who was directly impacted by the events.

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At work, in downtown Washington D.C.

Walked outside and could see the smoke from the pentagon.

NOT a happy time. Fortunately everyone I knew at the pentagon was OK.

I also remember a TON of 'inaccurate' reports including automatic gunfire repelling an assault on the State Department, a bomb squad defusing a bomb on the Mall, and a poison gas attack at the US Capitol. All of those disappeared down the memory hole, but I'm still curious about how they got reported.