questionshow to remedy sun burnt behind?

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To add to what @inkycatz said. You can find aloe juice at most health food stores. Go, get a big jug of it and a spray bottle. Apply as/where necessary.
Oh and be forewarned, if you actually drink it, you will need to spend copious amounts of time in the bathroom. Don't do it.

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Lots of aloe-based lotion. Good luck finding someone to apply it for you!!

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In this case Solarcaine. It is an aloe gel or spray that also contains a small amount of Lidocaine for some pain relief. Since you cannot easily avoid making contact with the surface that might help provide some sting relief. I usually agree with @inkycatz and go plain old aloe in this case the pain relief will be a welcomed addition.

For standard aloe try looking for one that does not have an alcohol in it. The alcohol helps in evaporate but can also slightly reduce the effects of the aloe. When it dries your skin will be a bit sticky but I find it works better.

@flyinggirl: I actually buy a aloe drink once or twice a week with lunch and find that it really is not different then water in that respect. I buy "Alo Enrich" which is aloe with pomegranate and cranberry flavoring. Standard aloe drinks have a very grapey flavor to it which I get tired of quickly. With that said I drink it because I enjoy the flavor I do not find that it has any real benefit for my skin from drinking.

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Add my +1 to Aloe Vera gel (or even better, fresh Aloe from a cutting from the plant - as an aside, mom always taught us to remember to thank the plant when we cut it...).
I would also recommend getting some Vitamin E Moisturising Gel to promote healing and anti-oxidation, but make sure it's alcohol-free. I really like Fruit of the Earth's Vit.E Gel (http://www.fote.com/prod_skin_gel.html), and I always make sure I keep a big bottle of it at home and at work to apply to any burns, chapping, cuts, or scrapes.
-=C=-

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http://www.walmart.com/ip/After-Sun-Aloe-Vera-Cooling-Gel/14122657

aloe with lidocaine. apply liberally. (i've had a bottle last two weeks, or a diff bottle last three years--it's cheap insurance agains the next burn)

this community seems to be burning itself a lot this summer. hope everyone recovers well and takes more/better preventatives in the future.

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@curtise: I agree with Fruit of the Earth product's, that is the alcohol free aloe I have used for years which and reason I mentioned try to look for alcohol free aloe above. Never tried the Vitamin E gel, will have to keep my eyes open for that and give it a try to see if it is more effective then the plain aloe.

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Get spray-on aloe, put in fridge, use for relief purposes.

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Another up-vote for aloe. Store it in the fridge. When you first apply it cold it can be a bit of a shock, but it helps cool the burn, too.

And avoid using soap or hot water when you shower or bathe, at least until the red has faded. Otherwise you'll be facing some wicked peeling!

Oh, and no, I don't need to see the photos.

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Another vote for aloe in whatever method/product you use.

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Burn cream is another option, especially ones that contain the much-touted aloe.

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Definitely aloe, and lots of it. Slather it on and just let your skin absorb it. Don't rub it in, just add more if it dries out and still hurts.

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http://www.emedicinehealth.com/sunburn/page5_em.htm

•aspirin, ibuprofen, and naproxen to decrease pain and inflammation are useful, especially when started early.
•For mild sunburn, cool compresses with equal parts of milk and water may suffice. Cold compresses with Burow's solution may also be used, and can be bought at a drugstore. Dissolve 1 packet in 1 pint of water. Soak gauze or a soft clean cloth in it. Gently wring out the cloth and apply to the sunburned area for 15-20 minutes. Change or refresh the cloth and solution every 2-3 hours.
•Aloe vera gel or aloe-based lotions may soothe irritated skin.
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continued

•Cool (not ice cold) baths may help. Avoid bath salts, oils, and perfumes because these may produce sensitivity reactions. Avoid scrubbing the skin or shaving the skin. Use soft towels to gently dry the body. Don't rub. Use a light, fragrance-free skin moisturizer.
•Avoid lotions that contain topical anesthetic medications because a person can become sensitized and then allergic to that medicine.
•Stay out of the sun while you are sunburned.
•Stay hydrated to avoid dehydration

REREAD LAST TWO _ VERY IMPORTANT