questionsdid you hear that adobe is stopping development…

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I have mixed feelings. For my purposes, the software suites they sell have been well out of my price range. When I have played with them I thought the learning curves were pretty steep. My impression of the $50 ($20) per month cost is for a year long subscription commitment. I would rather see a system where one paid per session or perhaps for individual months rather than the whole year.

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For the principle of it, I would refuse to pay a subscription to use an application. I'll just use one of the many other free options out there like Gimp, Pixia, Seashore, Inkscape, or Cinepaint.

If I pay for a program, I expect to use it for as long as I wish without needing connection to the Internet. Sorry Adobe, you failed on this decision.

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I prefer to own and have a physical copy of software for speed of installation/re-installation (even if they take up office space). Excellent for back up, but I'm unsure about storing working copies online. I can keep working even if the Internet is down/slow or when I'm on the road when everything is saved on my computer.

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@cengland0: Actually one would only need an internet connection once a month for about a minute to validate legality. You still download and install the program on your computer.
Instead of rolling out a new version, say like every 18 months, the subscription is sort of like an upgrade in place. Whether it's a good idea or not remains to be seen, a lot people don't like it.

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I like having the creative control to run on the version I want without worrying about Adobe pushing out a new version with a new interface and new bugs that I haven't discovered yet how to work around. With this, you're stuck paying extra money to use exactly what they want you to use, even if it sucks. Imagine being forced to upgrade to Windows 8 instead of being allowed to choose Windows 7 because that's what Microsoft pushes on the cloud...

Having the software isn't just about not using the Internet to check in. It's also about maintaining that last semblance of control that software companies seem to want to erode. It used to be that you bought software. Now you just buy a license to use the software. And now, Adobe doesn't even want you to have that. They want you to buy a right to use whatever they want to push out to you -- a constant moving target. It's a completely different business model.

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Their announcement on Facebook has hundreds of comments - not one is positive.

This only saves money if you would normally buy every upgrade release. I have CS5.5, but before that I had CS3. And I only upgraded for hardware acceleration and better OS X Lion compatibility. For Windows, I'm still using CS2. Because it still works - even on Windows 8, 64-bit. And now that they've provided activation-free versions, I don't have to worry about ever being unable to go back to it with the right hardware. Let's just see how long Windows will run CS2, but it has a much better track record than the Mac versions.

I have no interest in a monthly fee. I want to decide when to upgrade. I want to plan and set aside the cash. And I only want to upgrade when I absolutely have to. There are very few features that I care about that aren't in CS2. For that matter, if Adobe went bankrupt, would CC users even have software to use at the end?

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@cengland0: @xdavex: From what I've read, you only need to connect every 180 days to re-validate the license. The key here is that you no longer can run old versions and update at your leisure/need. But if you don't pay the protection money, what happens to your creative documents? Some things can read the format, but it's nothing for Adobe to change it up at any time and invalidate everything.

Another potential issue that nobody mentions is the student/teacher edition, which many many people take advantage of. You have to revalidate you're a eligibility every year, then pony up when you're out of school.

j5 j5
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@j5: As a hobby user, I bought the EDU version and used it for years before deciding to upgrade. You bring up a very valid point.

When I upgraded to CS5.5, I had just gotten to an EDU job and was eligible as staff. When Adobe accidentally posted a wrong coupon code (gave an extra 80% off instead of a total of 80% off with edu discount), that's when I got my new CS5.5 Design Premium for just over $100.

vote-for3vote-against

This is a terrible, terrible idea. If they go through with it, it's gonna push a LOT of paying users into the welcoming arms of piracy (not to mention alternate programs like The Gimp). Consumers in general HATE monthly fees... remember the late 90s when every website from porn to video-game tips tried to charge 20 bucks a month? How many of those still exist? Professional design shops will probably pay at least until they can transition to something else, but there's no way your average person is going to pay a monthly "Adobe bill" that costs as much as cable or a cel phone.

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It's where things are inevitably going to go but I'm no fan.

I do suppose those complaining the loudest though, are people who don't see how they're going to get bootlegged copies anymore. :oP

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@starblind: CS6 is no longer available as a trial download, and Adobe ran a DMCA takedown on all Google results for the binaries, so it's clear what this move is intended to do. (Though really, people who really want it can get it anyway)

@omnichad: I'm still kicking myself over that one. Had it in my cart, fell asleep, next day it's invalid.
bleh!

j5 j5
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@phillystyle: CC will be cracked just like CS. Don't have any doubts about that. It still installs as a real program on your computer. The people complaining are those who made a huge expense to go legit but didn't have the kind of income from using it that it takes to support renting it perpetually. I'm in that group. I can afford to buy it. I can't afford to rent it.

I don't do any pro design work. I like working in all the apps, just not doing it as my job.

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I'm not sure if they care about the individual users and this is more a move toward the corporate customers. They may lose the individuals (how many are they?) and get more from the corporate customers. What this does for them is that it creates a steady and even monthly income stream.

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@omnichad: Heeheehee no, I do know it will get cracked - day one's not out of the question. I didn't bother typing it out because it's a little nuanced, maybe. I'm a little surprised I got downvoted for merely bringing it up though. ;)
For instance it will install a program on your computer but not likely the whole application, just the application that will allow you to run it on their servers. Also, I think Adobe will probably wind up offering the local version because of the same bottleneck that has always been - bandwidth. I think they're a little ahead of themselves if they think a small/medium-sized graphics company has the infrastructure to quickly & smoothly pass 100+ MB images OR GB-sized video files they're trying to edit back and forth between the server & PC. Good luck with that.

I think ultimately, most everything including applications will wind up being in the cloud but today is not the day.

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@starblind: The cleverest monthly bill website I ever saw was from a very popular fanfiction author. She moved her fanfiction and original fiction to her own website, and started charging $5 a month or $50 a year for access. She promised a new chapter in each of her five ongoing series each month, plus bonus short stories whenever she had a muse, plus fan art from her friend, as well as access to a fairly large archive of her older works. It wouldn't make for a big business and there were lots of ways she could be cheated, but as a way of gaining some hobby income for a single creative person I thought it was very clever.

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@phillystyle: The software all runs and installs locally. You don't need always-on Internet. It just requires a phone-home online every month or so. You have the option of using Creative Cloud's storage to store your project files. But that's completely optional.

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@phillystyle, @omnichad is correct.
And CS7 (Now CC) dropped May 6, the day they announced the end to CS.

This would be a prime opportunity for something like Corel to sweep in and steal market share.

j5 j5
vote-for3vote-against

For those of you saying you don't need internet access all the time to use it, that might be true; however, how many companies have gone under or stopped supporting a game and you can no longer play it online. I would hate to have thousands of images created and then Adobe stop supporting this product in the future. At least if I had a licensed copy, even if it's an old version, I could still access my files.

As for me, I do not trust companies that require you to use an internet service to continue using their product. It is a single point of failure and all your previous work could go down the drain if they ever go bankrupt. As it stands now, if you bought a license to CS6, you may continue using it as long as you wish even after Adobe goes under. Some versions require a one-time activation but once you have it installed, it should continue to work forever.

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@omnichad: Do you think they'll do it anyway despite what their users want?

Who do they think they are? Microsoft?!?!

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Honestly, Adobe had to do something-- I would say 8 out of 10 people I know bootleg Adobe software for personal use.. The only people who ACTUALLY pay for $600 software is businesses and people with too much money..

Just my 2 cents

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@devexityspace: That's actually a marketing strategy. Microsoft (Gates?) even expressed it outright. Let them pirate now, become the standard, get the license later.

j5 j5
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@j5: Oh don't get me wrong, I dont like what Adobe is doing... I love Photoshop Suites, and this would keep me from ever upgrading :D

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@j5: @omnichad: Thanks for the little explainer. You know, that makes more sense as to how it works.

It seems like this change is going to upset a lot of people and I'm not sure it's worth it just to save the publishing & distribution costs of the DVDs and docs. There's likely more to be gained than that and I do believe it'll ultimately wind up in the cloud. I'm just not exactly sure HOW Adobe can make the transition. Maybe they figure there's going to be an uproar; it might as well be while they have a strong market position and there aren't a lot of competitors who are genuine threats.