questionshow do your get you cat to behave at night?

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Valium in their dinner?

We occasionally have this problem, but it's always transitory. You might try locking them away at night for a few days. Probably they are bored...maybe laser play time for a while, 1 or 2 hours before bedtime?

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I wouldn't lock them up. If your cats are anything like mine is, they'll meow non-stop until they get out/get their way. There's a product I found at PetSmart for my hyperactive dog that's seemed to calm her down some. I don't remember what it's called, but it's a liquid that you put into your pet's food that contains different calming/sleepy-time ingredients. That might work.

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@captainsuperdawg: Feliway is the cat version; it works occasionally, but we had to have a few spread around.

They do meow, but we have to separate them when they get over zealous with the stalking. Nothing like a cat argument in th middle of the night to get you out of bed fast. :/

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feliway is the stuff you plugin and it releases calming stuff into the air. they also have plastic calming collars with relaxing scents that made my chunky cat sleepy all the time.
i stuff mine full of wet cat food around 11pm (mixed with a bit of warm water), and have an autofeeder that feeds them dry cat food at 7am and 530pm. they get sleepy after eating at night, and even after the 7am feeding which i sleep through, when i wake up they're sleeping again

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@captainsuperdawg: i've never heard of that. I'm definitely going to look into though. Thanks.

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I had a similar issue with one of my cats getting hyperactive when I was trying to sleep, he would constantly jump up on the bed, get down immediately, and repeat all night.

It's finally gotten under control now that we devote an extra 20 minutes of playtime to him about an hour before bed with one of those feathers-on-a-string that you wave around to look like a bird. First toy we've found that he has a real interest in. He'll play with it until it's put away, then trots to bed with us and sleeps at our feet.

Of course, this has created a separate problem in that one of our other cats is now madly obsessed with the same toy and every time she sees you she runs to the door it's behind, begging you to get it out to play. But at least we're getting some sleep.

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with a door to the back yard.

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@okham: Speak to your vet, Valium is toxic to felines. Your vet can give you an alternative.

FYI, Valium, properly dosed, is safe for canines.

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@mschauber: Hate to disagree, but it (diazepam, or valium) is actually used post-operatively and as an appetite stimulant in cats. It is good in dogs, as well.

But definitely talk to your vet. And the comment was actually a joke. Our cat that was on it actually meowed more. :/

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Felines are naturally nocturnal, so no surprise they are active at night. I have found that wearing them out helps control this. I wake them up from their daytime naps & sun bathing to get them active. I play with them after dinner & shortly before getting into bed.

While dogs are not nocturnal, this is a technique I discovered many years ago with puppies I've had. If you get them really tired during the day, or in my case, before I would put them in a bag & take them to a client site, they just slept. 90% of the time clients never knew I had a puppy/dog with me. Trick was an active morning walk & play time with other dogs before 'we' went to work.

Same type of technique works for my two kittens. I know they are active at night b/c I find toys in different locations when I wake up, but they leave me alone. If I don't wear them out, I become one of their toys, especially when I move under the covers.

Check out: http://www.cathealth.com/inappropriate-behavior/normal-cat-behavior

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@okham: Quite honestly I can't speak to the post-op care b/c as easy as I find being a Paramedic & dealing with human illness, I'm equally uneasy with animal illness. I do know Diazapam is administered both IV & rectally to treat seizures. One of the known problems, albeit relatively rare, with orally administered Diazapam in cats is liver failure. A risk none of the vets I've taken my cats to in the past 11 years were willing to take.

Most recently, instead of using Valium I had at home, I was given Acepromazine when the younger of my two kittens wouldn't let me near her & she needed to see the vet and also to be spayed. This little PITA wouldn't even let me pet the scruff of her neck. I keep saying, "She's too smart for my own good." Her 'sister,' fellow adopted foster sibling, is the opposite. She let's me pet her, pick her up, hold her, cut her nails, put medication on her eye, etc. She let's me know if she's unhappy, but doesn't scratch, bite & run away & hide.

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You guys are lucky. Not only does mine meow all the time in the middle of the night, it likes to meow for no damn reason in the middle of the day. Just parks itself in the most random location and meows for 20 minutes. Sometimes it's meowing at the oven, sometimes it's the china cabinet, sometimes next to the toilet, sometimes 1" from the side of the couch or blankly facing a wall, etc etc etc. I've checked everything that they could possibly want. Plenty of food. Litter box is clean. I grab them and pay them attention and they climb out of my hands and go back to meowing. Been this way for years. Dumbest cats ever.

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@mschauber: I totally understand. It's not usually give long term, unless there is an already terminal condition. And Ace is a wonderful thing. We have two that used to have to get it, until we said screw it and have the vet come to the house for their annuals. Well worth the $50.

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@okham: Yeah, feliway didn't work for my cats at all. I just close my bedroom door and turn on a fan at night now (I sleep with a fan on anyways). They meow for a bit at the door but then they go about and spaz for a while then sleep.

Occasionally I will wake up to find they have knocked over a lamp and their cat condo. But, meh, better they knock over a $12 lamp then keep me up all night.

Another question: How do you keep your cats behaving when you're not around? They won't get on the counters when I'm home (for the most part), because I'll snap my fingers and chase them or give them a quick squirt. But I can tell by the hair that they are up there when I'm not home. One of them sheds badly and I don't want his hair all over my kitchen (or the litter that gets stuck to his paws)! Any ideas?

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@meh3884: Well, depending on how you want to play it, they make zap pads that give a small electric shock when they jump on them, or there are some motion activated options. Here's one:

http://www.petsmart.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2751025

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My cat's an indoor-outdoor cat, my stepdad, a long haul truck driver, found her begging for scraps in the snow in a supermarket parking lot somewhere in the mid-west and tossed her in the truck and took her back to their ranch. When he and my mom got divorced neither could afford to keep the ranch so they gave away all their animals. I liked Jasmine a lot so I drove 600 miles to Austin to get her. But having been an outdoor cat all her life, there's no way she was going to accept being strictly indoors. So when she acts out at night, I put her out. However, the reason I drove 1,200 miles for her is that she is an exceptionally well behaved cat and I've only had to put her out a couple of times in the past 3 years. She lays on the bed between my feet (she seems to understand I am allergic so she stays at the foot of the bed)and sleeps peacefully the night through. When the dog and I get up for a 4am potty break, she goes out and gets a snack, then comes back to bed with us.

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@meh3884: Depending on the surface, I've had success with these products:
- Fabrics (chairs, couches, etc:) http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0040V3R3C/
-- It doesn't keep them off but reduces their scratching.

- All surfaces (each of these are just different sizes:)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000P0QTYQ/
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00106Z2C4/
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006NE4QC/
-- The roll is the most universally easy to use
-- This stiff works great for keeping cats off of furniture you don't want them on. It pulls off cleanly and doesn't leave a residue. I even use it on this large antique urn my grandmother brought back from China. There is a silk tree in the urn that the cats like to play with, climb (almost like a monkey,) etc. I put this stuff around the rim and they stay off. No damage upon removal. Also great for couch corners, stops scratching.

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@okham Thanks! I might pick up one of those motion detectors. There is one on Amazon that has an alarm as well as the air puff.

@mschauber I don't have much of a problem with scratching, it's really just my kitchen counters that they get hair all over. But the corners of my couch are getting a bit beat up, so I may try it. Thanks!

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For the counters, I'd try lining the edge with tinfoil or something. Unpleasant noises/sensations on the paws will keep them down.

As for the rest, I'd agree that wearing the cat out as much as possible before bed helps. It sucks when I'm tired and just want to go to sleep to spend a good 20 minutes playing at high energy with the kitty to wear her out, but if that means we both sleep, so much the better. :)

Also, I'd like to recommend this book: Starting from Scratch: How to Correct Behavior Problems in Your Adult Cat, by Pam Johnson-Bennett. I haven't gone through all of it, but it seems very smartly written. I mean this in the "I have had cats/been around them all my life and it is still helpful" way.

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i keep a spray bottle full of regular tap water handy, even near my bed. if they act up, they get a spray directly at them. there's no harm but it snaps them out of what they were doing with the noise and they don't like water

i also find pawprints on my stove from when i'm not home. while i'm home they know they'll get sprayed and a good yelling and chasing, but if i'm gone i;m powerless. i tried citrus candles on the counters but i think they ignore them now. good luck with the hair! lol i get cat hair inside my fridge

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While I have no advice this is an entertaining animation that share's in your kittie related miseries... http://www.simonscat.com/Films/Cat-Man-Do/

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Also a funny way to exact revenge is type meowing cat into youtube and watch kitteh's reaction