questionsare tankless waterheaters worth the cost?

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Should you opt for a tankless, put rebuilding or replacing your aerators on the top of your maintenance list. When the aerator clogs up, the tankless stops working until the aerator is unclogged or replaced, according to the plumbers at my work. And they do not come as cheap as regular aerators. Your plumber should tell you about this when your tankless is installed.

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we have one at work, and i don't know if it's a feature of all tankless water heaters or if this one's a dud, but it sometimes gives hot water and sometimes regular cold. I can hear it clicking on and off when i use the kitchen sink, and it alternates constantly. it's really compact, under the sink.

this is at work and it's new since they recently remodeled, so i can't do much except dread washing my lunch dishes. i hope yours works better.

see if your state/county/city gives you green incentives for getting one.

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@w00tgurl: It sounds very much like yours at work is electric. Electric isn't so wonderful; gas is great. If yours is gas, then someone did something wrong on the install, or there's another problem. I have multiple friends who've all done this, and all of them think it's the bee's knees, the cat's meow, and too clever by half.

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Please be more specific. Are you asking about a "whole house" replacement hot water heater or one of those location things (like under the sink). The replys here confuse me somewhat. I'm very happy with a unit I installed about 10 years ago, replacing my 30 or 40 gallon tank type hot water heater (gas) with a tankless unit. I'm a do-it-yourselfer, so intalling it was no problem.

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I was talking to an electrician about these a few days ago. He said if your water's at all hard, you really need a water softener, too.

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Consumer Reports did a cost comparison, and it would take you 15 years to save as much money to make up for the install difference, and by then it would be time to replace it...so, what's the point? The only real advantage is never running out of hot water, and space saving. Money saving, not so much.

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I love mine...just make sure the heater is close to where you need the hot water. The shower upstairs takes a couple of minutes to warm up. You might consider a small 1 gallon electric under the kitchen and bathroom sinks for quick hand washing.

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@cubdawg: If you have a long run for your hot water, you can ease the wait. What you want to do is install a hot water recirculating pump on the sink in your farthest bathroom. What it will do is draw water from the hot line and backfeed it down the cold line until the hot water makes it to you. You push a button, and by the time you're ready to climb in the shower, the hot water is already there. These work no matter what sort of hot water heater you have.

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@shrdlu: i guess so, electric. i didn't know there were different kinds and sizes. thanks

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@pooflady You got plumbing advice from an electrician? =) Okay, but that sentiment is true regardless. If you live in a hard water area and you get a water softener, then you'll get fewer mineral deposits in the shower and on your dishes, plus the water "feels" better when you shower.

@secretagentwoman If the total cost of ownership is the same, then the added benefits of reduced space, reduced energy usage, and always having hot water ready to go should be a win.

@dosquatch So, do they make these with a switch now? I've seen the type where it recirculates the hot water constantly, and while get for getting instant hot water, drives up the gas/electric bill significantly, due to the wasted heat.

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Tankless are great! Save LOTS of money on gas bill.