questionsdoes anyone here use wireless range extenders or…

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I haven't used one in a while, but if you do, stay with the range extender with your specific brand of router or WAP. Though I don't like this brand much, I set up a Linksys wireless router then used a Linksys WAP/Range extender. Same model line, I believe.

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My modem is a 2Wire, provided by AT&T if that matters. I will look for 2Wire extenders, I hadn't thought about the brand name mattering.

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If you do set one up.. make sure the channels are different and don't overlap.

Channel 1 for the main router.
Channel 6 for router #2
Channel 11 for router #3

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Also... you can buy most any wireless router that has "Bridge mode" and set up your own repeater

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I wanted to extend my wireless to my back porch and garage. I installed a Trendnet TEW-713RE range extender. My wireless router (EA4500) is at the front of my house, with the Trendnet extender outside on the back porch. Now, I'm able to get strong wireless "N" on the whole 10x30 covered porch, my garage behind the house, a bedroom above the garage and maybe 200' up the road (be sure and use strong security!). Couldn't get any of this before the Trendnet was installed.
The Trendnet didn't get great reviews. The setup is clumsy. If you ignore the automatic setup and plug a cable into the extender to your computer for manual setup, it is easy. This has worked trouble-free since I installed it a few months ago. I paid $20 on sale for this, including shipping. It's been a great investment.

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I needed to extend the range on a signal a couple hundred feet away and was too confused by the myriad of products. In my search I came across Ubiquiti products on Amazon. Everything they sell has 4-5 star reviews. I bought one (Nanostation) which shoots a unidirectional signal. Was pretty easy to set up, works great. Faster signal than my Asus Repeater.

Might work for your needs and might not, but worth it to spend a few minutes to check out there stuff. Its priced a bit higher, but worth it.

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_1?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=ubiquiti

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I wouldn't place too much value on sticking to the same brand. In some cases, they do play together nicely, but I've experienced just as many complications with some too.

For a cheap but versatile option, look into this Rosewill unit, which is currently $16 after the coupon EMCWXXT74 (expires 10/09/13). Not the easiest to setup, but for the price, you can't beat what it can offer either.

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I had to extend wireless to a 2nd building at my Church's school. I used the EnGenius ENH500 dual channel long-range wireless router. I was planning to use the 2nd channel as a bridge to another repeater, but the signal was so good that I didn't need it at all.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833168092

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2wire routers are, to but it bluntly, total and complete crap. Are you using Uverse or (cringe) ATT DSL? In either event you can disable the router portion of the box that ATT gives you and either go back to what you used to use or buy one of the new AC standard routers which are supposed to have excellent range. The first thing I did when I got Uverse was disable the router, and use a new Belkin which I've been pretty happy with.

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I have a Dlink Dir655 and a DAP 1522 and I have to say for inside my house when I did testing with my laptop my connections were faster without the bridge than with it in place even though the signal was lower.

I'm not saying this will be the case for everyone but you probably should test to see if it's even worth having the bridge in place. I ran for months before deciding to test and sure enough it wasn't worth having the bridge in.

Now if you need lan jacks at the other location then a bridge is worth it. I would try and move the AP the most central spot in the house and use Inssider to help with configuring the AP. On the DIR655 I have 3 antennas and I used to have them going different ways but you don't want that, you want them all to go the same way and you can see on Inssider that once you start moving the antennas the connection drops when they are not the same.

It takes a bit of work to get the best layout but it's worth it in the end.

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I use a wifi repeater and it works awesome. It was only 20 bucks and I get a way better signal in my family room now.

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I had a Linksys repeater/extender and I couldn't get it to work reliably with my Linksys router. Connections would just die every 20-30 minutes and I would have to unplug/plug it to get connections for another little while. Switched to a Netgear extender and router and that works great - no complaints.

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I have two Linksys E2500 routers, I installed ddwrt on one of them and set it to bridge mode, things work great. There are lots of good guides online for how to do it; each router cost me ~$70.

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Have you looked at powerline adapters?

I bought the ZyXel HD Powerline Adapter (PLA4215, PLA4225 and PLA4205).

Plug the controller into your wall outlet with an ethernet cable running to it from your modem.
This introduces the internet signal to your electrical system running throughout your house.

Take the receivers and plug them into an electrical outlet in your house, and run an ethernet from that receiver to whatever requires an internet signal (laptop, PC, switch, router, etc).

They have worked great here.

My son's PC was getting 26Mbs wireless, but plugged into this receiver he is now getting 38Mbs.
Netflix, which was taking 2 minutes to begin showing the stream wirelessly, now starts the show within 5 seconds.

This may be a great alternative to a wireless extender, and may provide a much greater speed for your internet throughout your house without having to run ethernet!

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@wilfbrim: ATT DSL it is. My old modem died and I bullied ATT into giving me a new one for free.

@jlowrance: I'd rather do without Netflix than run cables all over the house. If there's not a wireless solution then I'll stick with my current setup.

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@moondrake: He's talking about a product that runs your internet through existing power lines in the home. There's no need to run cables. Running your network through the power lines is convenient but it is really really dependent on how good your wiring is. My house was built in 1935 and I still have some knob and tube wiring so it won't work for me. If you have modern wiring it could work really well for DSL, but you'll never get gigabit speeds like on cat5/6.

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I agree with the previous posts suggesting the powerline adapters. It might be a solution to your problem. It doesn't require running a lot of cable. You have two short ethernet cables - one connecting the controller to your modem, another one connecting from the receiver to whatever device you want to use. I suggest that you at least explore this option.

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@moondrake: You don't run cables all over the house. You plug the receiver into a power outlet at the device (Roku, BluRay player, etc), and then a short ethernet cable from the receiver to the device.

My outlet is 2 feet from my entertainment center. I actually have the receiver going to a switch and everything plugs into the switch at that point. It's all hidden behind the entertainment unit.

I went with a powerline adapter specifically because I did not want to have to run cables through walls, ceilings, etc. All you need is a power outlet and an ethernet cable long enough to reach the device.