questionsdo you have a favorite shop to get auto touch up…

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My boyfriend restores classics and he says PP&G is the best he's used. He has been doing this for over 40 years.

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@grblack: Thank you. Unfortunately I can't find any one who sells retail for these guys (or any paint code matching tool...). Thank you, though.

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@lavikinga: Thank you! This is just a rubbing compound, though, it is not a paint, although I am sure it works very well for little scratches.

Thanks, though!

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@lll0228: Are you sure you looked at the pull down menu? Because they sell the actual color matched paint in 1oz bottles along with the sealants and everything you need. More than just rubbing compound.

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+1 for drcolorchip. if it's a significant sized area, stored outside, and/ or more than just a few years old, you'll need to over-paint, and then compound it all to blend it in.

Have you checked the dealer though? if your car is within the past couple of generations for it's model - it's likely they'll have paint in various quantities from touch up pens to pints.

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It can be difficult, as others have mentioned, to match paint on an older car that has seen a lot of sunlight. Something else to consider, if you want this to look just like new (which I assume you do given the nature of the question,) is that you'll need a dust-free environment to apply the paint, or the application won't look as smooth as the original. This factor keeps me from painting myself, as I don't have access to a booth. I usually order the body panels I need from the factory and bring them to a local body shop to do the matching. It's tricky business, but if you can pull it off on your own you'll save a ton of cash.

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@lavikinga: Ah, I see it now, thank you. I was distracted by all the pretty colors on that page and missed the paint code box on the right!