questionshow strong is your password?

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MiNeS REalLy StROnG21356436

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my wifi was protected by Password12345 for the longest time. Other than that, I do letter shifts, special characters, alpha numerics, etc.

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Nope. I use phrases, which are much more difficult for software to crack. Adding numbers is good, but leet speak will only get you so much security. It's not hard to tell a password cracking app to substitute 0 for o if o doesn't work. It is hard to tell it to try 'IAmInvincible!'.

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The only way to make a password hard to crack is to make it very long. All that stuff about adding numbers/et al is garbage if your password is only a few characters long.

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damn, monkey made the list. guess I am going to have to change my password now :)

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I have no clue, how strong is "Woot!luv3r" as a password?

Just curious..... not like I use it as my password for everything and captainsuperdawg for all my login names.......... because that would be........ stupid...........

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It always amazes me how many people either keep "admin" as the password, use "password", or just use no password on systems.

Hey, administrative professionals, come up with something that secures your work computers from someone taking them over!

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@drjing: That's actually the job of a solid firewall, the peeps I work with mostly use 'password'.
Allen Ludden would've been proud.

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Mulder changed it to TRUSTEVERYONE.

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I use a password manager to generate passwords I can't memorize with letters and numbers (and symbols if the website allows), so I just memorize the master. If I can't use the manager, I use words+numbers as above that I can remember, or the first letters of a common phrase (and a number to be safe).

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My passwords are variations on "the quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog". Different shifts, some numbers substituted for letters, some spaces and some not, sometimes I add words or suffixes, some words are pluralized, etc.

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@cityonthesea:

That's one of my favorite xkcd's.

ashley and bailey, huh? I wonder why?

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I have 4 different passwords now, as I've had to keep creating a new one as the number of and type of characters required for passwords on certain sites keeps rising ><

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Wait, qazwsx is not a good password? Damn, I'll need to start using edcrfv.

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@robguest: edcrfv did not work on your woot account. Did you change it yet?
: P

@dmaz: it is recommended you use a different word per site. (Preaching not practicing.) I am working on this.

edit for long time internet users: make sure you still have control over you email you send lost passwords to. Example I have unknown security risk as my forgot password were sent to lycos.com. I am sure if someone who had sometime could sign up for my old lycos email and retrieve the password.

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I have a great way to make strong passwords. I read this in MaximumPC Magazine and have used it ever since. What you do is think of a easy to remember sentence like: My favorite band in the whole world is(insert band name here). Then take the first letter of each word of the sentence: mfbitwwiibnm and add some numbers to it. We'll use 1234 for this, but you should probably not use 1234. your password would be mfbitwwiibnh1234. Random to most, but not to you. You can even write the sentence down to help you remember and the passwords will still be hard to crack if the sentence is found. This is my tip of the day. :P

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@housry23: That's a great idea!

I use a combination of leet speak and shortened "online chat" spelt words. Like "luv" for love. Or "iz" for is. Or "da" for the. When you combine these type of words with leet, you get things like "!z" for "is". Add a capital letter or two in there and it's a damn strong password, that still reads like a sentence to me.

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not on the list but I used to have a complex password that was kind of nerdy and ended up being in the top 500 most common PW.

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How strong is your password. This will not warn you about using dictionary words but a heads up.

Turns out mine is too short. (ya ya that is what she said, my security adviser)

https://www.microsoft.com/security/pc-security/password-checker.aspx

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@housry23: That's a variation on Charleston price coding- and old retail thing. The word 'Charleston' has 10 unique letters, assign each letter #1 through 10. People that use this normally use some variant on DOB, so 12/31/1947 becomes ChaCCors.
Not so hard to remember, add a few numbers to it and add even more security.

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@cityonthesea: I came here to post that. I've tried to make that argument at work but didn't get very far.