questionsi quit my job. now what?

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Is the out-of-state job close enough that you could be a weekend commuter until you see if it's what you want to do or find a better offer? If you turn that job down for the time being, will there still be an offer on the table if/when you begin to regret it? If you took the out-of-state job permanently and moved, how badly would you miss being around your friends and family -- of is it close enough that you'd be able to visit/have visitors frequently?

There are a lot of variables in this equation, but the only one that can really decide what those are is you. Sit down with your loved ones (wife, life partner, etc) and figure it out. Weigh your options, and don't sell yourself short, but be sure you're not missing a great opportunity either. This is a terrible time to be seeking desirable employment, so that will be a HUGE factor if you find that, despite the pay.

Good luck!

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@capguncowboy: It's 8 hours away, so it is possible for me to live and work there for a few days, then come home on my days off. It just seemed like such a nice place. The people were friendly and while I hate the paycut, money isn't everything. We're wanting to leave Houston by the end of the year anyway, so I figure this is a great way for us to really check out some other areas. But I understand where my friends are coming from. It is a fear to take a job, and then 3 weeks later have another offer come with much higher pay. But as I found with this job, just because they pay more doesn't make it a good job.

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I was in a mildly similar position, but luckily for me things changed dramatically at my current employer before I got to the "quit" part. I was very actively looking and had almost taken two different positions when something random stopped both from happening (long story). Now, I'm very happy with the opportunity I have but it was just chance. I was willing to take just about anything that wasn't what I was doing, and I was in danger of taking something for that very reason. I don't know what field of work you are in, but I would say take the chance with a company that seems like a good place to work, the work is what you want, they are offering you a job now, and if you can afford the paycut. Nowadays people aren't staying in jobs for long periods of time, so if you continue to look and find something better in the next year or so (or if this place doesn't turn out to be as good as it seems), then you can move on.

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If possible, talk to some employees at the new place and see if it's reasonable to expect a pay increase after a while. Some places start you off low so they're not out of a major investment if you decide to bail on them, but will raise your salary after a "probationary" period, usually 6 months to a year.

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You could try that thing where you list the pros and cons of the decision. To me, if you have what you need, quality of life is the most important thing. You seem to be saying the same, so I think you are leaning toward accepting the offer. If you take the job it doesn't mean you can't move on if you change your mind.
@capguncowboy is correct when he mentions it's a terrible time to be job hunting.

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I moved to Germany for a job right out of college, since there wasn't anything else here. One of the best decisions I've made. That said, I didn't have a family or any real commitments so it was an easy call.

Honestly, if you're planning on moving anyway, and the pay is sufficient, I would say to take it. Congrats on getting out of a crappy situation. Did it feel as liberating as it sounded?

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I would vote on the new job, and enjoy the excitement of living in a different city and meeting new friends.

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if you want to read about the other job, check out glassdoor.com. they list reviews about major companies from employees or former employees, also salary ranges, job postings and other details. plus you can give your feedback about the job you just left for others to find.
it's free to join and search but you're limited unless you submit your own reviews. if you submit reviews you unlock the limitations for viewing other reviews
good luck!
i've left a higher paying job and job offers of a position that i just hated. i'm glad i did, plus i ended up introspecting about what i actually wanted while working the lower paying jobs

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When I was 19, my dad told me to never take a job I didn't like simply because the money was good. It was among the best pieces of advice I've ever received.

I've worked in jobs that paid less than what I could earn elsewhere but which gave me great personal satisfaction. The three or four times I've ignored my dad's advice, I was totally miserable within a few weeks and couldn't wait to find a "happier" work place.

If your basic financial needs will be met with the company you're considering, I'd say go for it. And if the perfect job offer comes along three weeks later, go for that one.. In this time of employees being considered merely part of the inventory instead of a valued part of the assets, I've completely abandoned any concept of loyalty to an employer.

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One thing to take into consideration is the cost of living in this other place. is it higher or lower than where you live now.

Speaking as one of the chronically unemployed, (I've only scored a few temporary assignments in over a year) if this new place is paying enough for you to live on, you may want to take it, and just continue to send out resumes. That way you are at least employed till something better comes along.

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The job sounds worth it, but we can't really give you advice without more info. Do you have a close group of friends you will miss? A gf/partner? Do you just really like your town, or maybe you don't give a hoot.

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I probably would have hung on to your old job until you lined up a new one (or actually got fired), but I guess it's too late for "shouldas".

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Take the new job. You already made a (somewhat poor) decision to quit a job before getting a new one, so you may as well see where it leads. And, you can always continue your job search along the way.

I look at jobs as I look at cars. The one you have is fine, until a better deal comes along.

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I am with just about everybody else: take the offer. It sounds like you don't have any kind of severance, and they took back your 2 weeks of pto, so you will feel the pinch soon.

You have a decent offer, and there is much to be said for continuing to work. It's already been mentioned: you can continue to network and look for something better. In the mean time you have money coming in and no blank spot on your resume. It's better to be working than not: take the offer.

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My first career job I was faced with the option of having a job with less pay but a way better working environment or more pay and a job that would stress me out every day.

I went for the job with less pay and 5 years later I'm at the same job and still enjoying my work.

Unless you NEED a job with higher pay, I say try to find something that makes you happy.

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What do you love to do?

If this new job is something you love to do, that's worth more than money.

Good luck! I quit a job w/o another one and it worked out just fine. Was lean going for a while but I survived, then thrived. Everything will be ok. :)

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I already had resumes sent out before I quit, plus I made sure I had a decent savings account. Like I said this has been coming for a bit. I was prepared to leave last year and sort of got stuck staying while everyone else flew the coop (most took pay cuts at their new jobs, but were happy to leave) I work in the medical field, and this particular hospital is a magnet hospital and will be buying new technology and doing things that very few other hospitals in the world do, so it's hard to turn that down. They called me the day after I quit, and I had the job offer the day after the interview. As soon as I accepted the offer, calls started coming in frm other employers both in Houston and back in my hometown of Vegas. While they'll both offer more money, I know I won't have the advancement opportunities or get the great education this place is offering. It's a hard call because it would be substantially more pay (for Vegas it's a $10 an hr bump in pay). I've decided to give it 6 months

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@magic cave: I agree. I'm the only loyal one in the workplace, and it's gotten me nowhere. I figure I'll give this place 6 months and then review. I've seen plenty of people bounce from job to job with no ill effect. And here I just keep plugging away at the same place with no future. I guess I knew I really hated it when I saw how they treated one of the older employees there. She'll be 70 in July, and will have been with the company 40 years in July as well. They don't want to give her time off to get her knees fixed before she retires. She's been there 40 years, and they'd drop her in a heartbeat if they could find a way to keep her pension-DISGUSTING!

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@minxa1: Seriously disgusting. (And yet, some folks still think unions are bad things.)

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@minxa1: when we're young, the factor we care is the space for development. We have to admit it's the way for us to show our ability and prove that we can make the good use of what we've learned before. But how is the reality ? It's cruel. So,We have to make choices now and then,howerer, whatever we've made , i think a friendly atmosphere and times gatering with family is important to us when we at specific age,e,g,when we have child.
Anyway, life is full of miracle, we have to be optimistic and sharing with our family. Best wishes to all of you!