questionswhat window tint should i get for my living room?

vote-for23vote-against
vote-for11vote-against

100% black with mirror finish on outside. Be cool, vision is secondary.

vote-for3vote-against

I'd go for Alcoa aluminum foil, shiny side facing out.

Better yet, if you're not afraid of a fire hazard, get some foil-faced foam insulation. It will make a serious difference, but the foam core really is flammable.

vote-for4vote-against

I am restricted to smoke or copper. I want to know if there is any difference between those 2.

vote-for7vote-against

So you can't even get a portable ac unit that doesn't require window installation like this one? http://m.bestbuy.com/m/e/product/detail.jsp?skuId=1980337&pid=1218330802464&pcatId=abcat0907004. (If the link doesn't work just search for portable air conditioner)

By no window installation I mean the entire unit doesn't stick out. I think an exhaust hose still goes out a window though.

vote-for4vote-against

Not knowing anything about window coverings, I would suspect the copper to reflect more of the light\heat. Darker colors tend to absorb more light which transfers into heat.
This is the reason I got light grey shingles on my house.

vote-for3vote-against

I'm in the same boat as you, AC wise. I never thought about window tinting... You may have just saved my summer

vote-for3vote-against

You can't even get a portable AC unit? Not the kind that mounts in a window. The kind that just vents out a window.

vote-for3vote-against

Couple of issues to keep in mind.
What type of windows are these? Double pane? Single? more?
Most films are incompatible with double pane glass, voiding the warranty. The film may actually crack the glass due to thermal stress.

That said, look for a film containing ceramic. I'm not sure if the "copper" you mention is just color or actually contains copper, but metallic is preferable to non-metallic, and ceramic is preferable to either.

j5 j5
vote-for2vote-against

Amateur speaking :

When light goes thru glass, some/much of the light energy is changed to heat energy. After the remaining light entered the room, it hits the walls, furniture, carpet, floor, etc, and some of those absorb some energy and radiate is back as heat. Or something like that.

So try to prevent light (direct sunlight) from hitting the glass (thru shade, awnings, shutters, porches, etc) then to prevent/reduce light transmission thru the glass (reflective aluminum foil, window tint), then to prevent/reduce direct sunlight from hitting the surfaces in the room (curtains, shades, etc)

So darker or more reflective is better than less reflective. And closed curtains, blinds, shades also help. It is the exact problem that window tint for autos is designed to solve, and those people are pros, so talk to some of them. Also consider using foil or thermal foil insulation (home depot) which are both better than tint.

Also get a window unit for a portable a/c if you can

vote-for2vote-against

@mortar235: Dont want one. I get claustrophobic with windows closed and I can't tolerate the sound. And the electric bill.

vote-for2vote-against

@bsmith1: I could but I hate A/C. The sound really drives me insane. I want to see how this summer is and then revisit the issue next year.

vote-for2vote-against

Thanks all. I have wood horizontal blinds but gaps on the side. I'm thinking I need to go with reflective copper color based on thoughts from people here. Found some on Ebay that is the magnetic kind so adheres with water so I can remove for the winter if I want to.

vote-for2vote-against

@minkeygirl7: FYI... "adheres with water" is how (just about) all the tint products I've seen go on. What you call magnetic may be more aptly named "static". I've done tinting on my windows using the Gila product, it went on the same way.

Good luck with your project.

j5 j5
vote-for3vote-against

If you want to look out your windows except in the afternoon when direct sunlight hits and the blinds are closed anyway, you might just use those reflective auto shades that either curl small with springs in the rim, or the kind that just unfold. Available at Walmart, any auto store, ebay, amazon, etc. Just pop those in the windows before the sun will hit, then pop them out after sunset. More effective at preventing heat gain than tint, and prob no landlord issues. Nothing to install. Way cheap. Several can be duct taped together. College students do this in their west facing dorm rooms.

vote-for3vote-against

@f00l: Interesting idea. however I never open the blinds I want to put the tint on. And I own my property so I can do what i want.

vote-for2vote-against

If you own your property, depending on the window size, awnings are more effective than tint cause direct sunlight never hits the windows. Fabric awnings might fade or deteriorate over time or not - don't know. Metal ones seem to just last. Many people use them in the south. You can also combine them with tint. They may cost, but might improve the value of the house somewhat, and you may save some on your electric bill, if you use a/c at all.

Awnings might not look right on some houses or some windows. You might have to get code approval.

In hot sunny climates my ideal house would be built as they were 100 years ago - covered porches and awnings all over - even with central a/c

I thought you wanted the views at some times because you mentioned not wanting to feel closed in somewhere if I remember.

vote-for2vote-against

@f00l: Cant do awnings. One reason why I hate A/C is you have to close everything up and I get to feeling claustrophobic (plus I can't tolerate the noise). I have windows on all four sides so I get plenty of light. I keep the blinds down on the front where I want the tint) for privacy. After looking into options, tint is the best bet, just didn't know what kind. I don't want to black out the windows or put up foil, Just tint to reflect the sun beating in.

vote-for2vote-against

I think you can also get tint window shades, to pull down when its sunny, if that appeals to you. I have seen those used in homes and nice commercial buildings.

As for color, I think window tints are rated by amount of light transmission - ie a given tint blocks 80‰ or whatever. Darker is better. Some tints are slightly reflective - more reflective helps keep the interior cooler, but completely reflective might make the house look odd.

Other color considerations might be just to give consumers a design choice. The people who sell the tint can prob answer that.