dealswestern digital wd30ezrx 3.5" internal hard driveā€¦

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@tehmark: It's $135 on Amazon right now.

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@kiltedbear @tehmark: The only difference between "bare" drives and retail drives are the price and the fancy box you get with the retail drive. They don't have a different plant that manufactures drive for the retail and OEM (bare) markets. I have a "bare" WD 2TB green that has been operating in my HTPC 24/7 for over 3 years without fault.

@daveofva: The WD green drives are by no means slow. WD doesn't specify the operating RPM. They use a what they call Intelliseek which varies the RPM of the drive based on the demand. When bought the 2TB Green for my HTPC, I benchmarked it against a 1TB black series drive, and the green drive was only 3MB/sec slower. IMO, the green drive is the better drive considering it cost the same (at the time), has twice the capacity, is quieter and performs the same.

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thats why they are meant for storage as advertised however if you partition out the edge of the disc's you can significantly increase the read write speeds of the drive at least for that partition but fairly decent price for the 3tb but you might as well spend the extra 20-30 for a seagate goflex net drive or usb 3.0 becuase you can always take off the base and use it like a bare drive lol even though i prefer western digital by far over seagate

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Bummer. I just replaced my harddrive last week.

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One thing I failed to notice in the details about the hard drive, either here or on the Newegg site, is that it does NOT tell you the speed of the hard drive. Sure, it gives you the transfer speed of "Interface SATA 6.0Gb/s" but most times when a hard drive says "green" in its title it means a speed of 5400RPM. NOT good if you're playing a graphic intensive game. Just saying....

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Yeah, the "green" drives are slowwwww. 5400 RPM. Unless you have 3TB of music and documents, I'd pass.

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I've honestly had no luck with bare drives since about 2003. They just all fail after a year or two.

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@tehmark: They often do. It's because they are manufactured cheaply. They could manufacture near fault free drives, but nobody would order them because they would be thousands of dollars. There is a compromise in between, but it seems like manufacturers have opted to manufacture cheaply and then just give a limited warranty just in case.