dealsintel 320 series 2.5" 160gb sata ii mlc internal…

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Keep in mind that this is SATA II and that's like half the transfer rate of SATA III, hence the low price.

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Last I checked, all SSDs were fast as all get out.

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There is some truth to what Knarf009 says. SATA II will get you around 250MB/s read and write speeds while SATA III will get you about 450-550MB/s read and write.

Though most SATA II SSD's will outperform most standard 5400 or 7200RPM HDD's, SATA III is worth the higher price and performance. Most SATA II SSD's are about $1 a GB now, while most SATA III are about 1.5-2 dollars per gig.

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All SSDs will out perform HDDs everything. SATA II SSDs are still miles (seconds) ahead of HDDs in terms of access times which is what you'll notice most. Because of their size, you don't use them to store data (ideally) so sustained read/writes aren't as important, it's their ability to quickly access data that's so important and useful.

SATA II (3Gbps) is sufficiently fast for anything you would need a SSD for. Sure there are SATA III (6Gbps) but you probably won't notice a difference between the two outside of benchmarks. I wouldn't say it's worth the price difference.

Now the biggest part of this deal is that it's an Intel 320 series. This is one darn reliable SSD and Intel is backing that up with a 5(!) year warranty. It may be SATA2, but it is one of the most reliable SSDs on the market. Some of the cheaper drives use a sandforce 2 controller which was unreliable, but may have been fixed in an update, not sure.

I have the 80 GB version and it's great.

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I agree with brad3326 that Sata II vs Sata III doesn't matter for the most part. A few things to keep in mind.
1. Harddrives don't even saturate Sata I, which is half the speed of Sata II. You are more than doubling your performance with this anyways.
2. Unless you bought a computer within the past year it probably doesn't even support Sata III.
3. You can really only hit the high Sata III performance with a high Queue Depth (QD) workload. Most normal people workloads hover around 1 or 2, maybe a QD of 5 if you really hammer your computer. QD's above 10 or 20 is where you start seeing benefits from Sata III.

In other words don't worry about performance, get the most GB/$. Source: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/solid-state-drive-work-tests,3064-12.html

At $1/GB This is a pretty good deal, and $160 is large enough to outright replace a harddrive if you don't store a lot of videos or games.

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all, where is the rebate forms for the drive? i could only find the below at $35.

http://www.intel.com/cd/channel/reseller/asmo-na/eng/306999.htm