dealsseagate backup plus 4 tb usb 3.0 desktop external…

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Great price but for me why would you trust 4TBs of data to a single drive, one thing happens and you are out of luck. Buy a 2 HD external RAID device that has mirroring for something of this size. But again that's me.

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@zapp brannigan: For me it is a backup drive, so for this it's perfect! (But still buy 2 drives for offsite storage too.. heh heh)

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@crewnecktech: I'm looking at this thing more for people's movies that they access frequently (because seriously nobody other than a file server needs 4 TBs), even having 1 as a backup it would suck having to have both connected when you add a new movie.

But you could buy 2 and take them out of the enclosure and put them into your own. I mean the cheapest 4 TB drive out there is $190

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But the question for backups is will Win7 recognize the drive for them? It, the Windows backup utility that is, won't recognize a 3TB, so why would it a 4TB? What about Win8?

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@zapp brannigan: True, not sure what that does to the warranty though. Do they cover external drives that way? All my backups are scripted (rsync and time machine), so there's no further menace to having one serve as a backup or not.
@trybble: Don't know, I use 'em to rsync off volumes of my SAN, and on the network at Time Machine targets for our office. So I'm out of the windows game..

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Bottom line:
To use Windows Backup and Restore utilities, this will work with Windows 8.
If you have Windows 7 or older, the Windows Backup and Restore utilities will give you an error.
It's because of the 4k native file system on this drive.
Windows will also cough if you try to transfer large files using Windows explorer in Windows 7. Same reason. Strangely it can read and write smaller individual files, but big transfers are no go.
This is frustrating because if I pay money for something like this, I want a solution, not another problem.

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@zapp brannigan: I'm buying two. I would buy 4TB drives instead of 2x 2TB because I need that much space. Also because 1x 4TB takes less power than 2x 2TB.

As for opening and removing the bare drive, yes it technically voids the warranty. Workaround for that problem is that if the drive fails, contact seagate to arrange return, then ask if you can open the external case to try and recover data from the drive, since once you ship it back to seagate , you are unlikely to get the same drive back and will therefore lose any data on the drive. Once you get an OK to open the case and try to recover your data, you're all set.

The problem for me (I want to crack these open and install the two drives in a new desktop I'm building) is which drives are inside. Early releases of this external had 7200 rpm drives inside, and recent ones have 5900 rpm drives. I'm hoping for the 7200 rpm ones....

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This would be a great way for me to consolidate all my older lower capacity drives. I have a bunch of 250, 500 & 750GB GB drives lying around.

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Sounds like a great deal. Would definitely be a great backup drive.

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@zapp brannigan: I'm thinking that in 5 years, we'll easily be storing 10+ TB on a single drive, if cloud computing doesn't completely take over (I prefer to always have a local copy of everything).

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@zapp brannigan: It's even called a backup disk, zapp. That's a primary purpose -- to use as a backup drive. I already have a NAS using a RAID configuration, but it's good to have a simple external drive like this for backups.

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I BUYED ONE!

My plan is to yank the drive, partition it into two mirrored 2GB partitions - then I have enough space AND redundancy in case one fails!

WIN!

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@rrussell: But it's still a single physical drive, yes? If the drive fails you lose everything, mirrored partitions or not.

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@gwk1967: You are correct - mirroring is only helpful when joining multiple physical disks, not logical partitions.

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Synology users note, if you want to use this as a scheduled USB3 backup drive, Synology doesn't support hibernation on this drive. Stick with a Western Digital Mybook 4TB.

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I buy RAID enclosures from OWC and then I buy these when they're on sale, tear out the HDD and put it in the RAID enclosure, I'm going to get 4 of these 4TB and put them in a RAID 10 array:)

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@kamikazeken: the flaw with your idea is that it's not going to fly. The "port" in the bottom were it attaches to the modular base, is the actual HDD, when you plug into it you're are directly connected to the HDD. While I would certainly ask (and argue), I wouldn't hold my breath that I would get anywhere.

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The price is nice, but be aware, Seagate has lowered the warranty from 5 years to 3 of late. Just me probably,but I have had to return 4 of the last 5 Seagate drives I've owned under warranty for hardware or firmware failure. They say they have a 3% fail rate under warranty--if that's true, I'd like to take that kind of luck to a casino. I will not be trusting my data to one of these.

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Just wanted to mention that I bought a 2TB version of this model drive (Seagate Backup Plus) from Staples on Black Friday just this past Thanksgiving, and it has already failed (click, click, click noise and does not mount). It's possible it got knocked over and/ or stepped on by my 8 yr. old son, but I would caution others that this drive seems to be pretty fragile. If you buy one, make sure you treat it very, very gingerly.

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@rrussell: This is useful if the failure mode is that individual sectors become unreadable; it's not at all helpful if the failure mode is that the controller or the head positioning hardware fails, making all the data unreadable. Lately, I've seen more the latter than the former, though I still sometimes see drives fail a little at a time.

I would wish that drive manufacturers would expose more information about the geometry of the drives, so that we could more usefully exploit, for example, using each platter of a multiplatter drive as a separate element of a RAID5, getting some additional reliability out of an "inexpensive" disk.

Finally, on the "inexpensive" note, Amazon seems to have dropped out of selling the item, shortly after I got my two. The current price is 158.44 via a third-party seller.

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@gwk1967: Oh - then I should pull the 2tb drive from my WD "My Book WOrld" and do a 3-way RAID 5. (a RAID 3)?

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Am I missing something? Price on woot says one thing. Click "I want one" and it takes you to Amazon where its $20 more than Woot price plus $8 shipping. What gives?

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@zapp brannigan: I heard the exact same argument from someone when 1GB drives were released. . .

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@michaellawh: Amazon's sold out. The remaining sellers have higher prices.