dealshitachi 16” purefire 2-stroke gas-powered chain…

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Mine came in yesterday via Fedex, thanks Woot!!!! Haven't fired it up yet, but does anyone know if it's already filled with chain oil, or do I need to fill it first?

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@tesla33: because electricity produced by coal-fired power plants is so much cleaner than a modern 2-stroke engine, not to mention power conversion efficiency losses.

Or the necessity of running a generator to power the electric chainsaw as most chainsaws are not used within 50ft of a power outlet.

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Shipping Update
Hitachi 16” PureFire 2-Stroke Gas-Powered Chain Saw has completely shipped via FEDEX Ground. All tracking has already been emailed out. You can also find your tracking number by following this link and use your ORDER NUMBER as the reference number.

https://www.fedex.com/AltRefTracking?cntry_code=us

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@skaidau: Tanaka is a brand under the Hitachi Power Tools Group.

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►►►►►►►►►► REBATE INFORMATION ◄◄◄◄◄◄◄◄◄◄

Ok folks, here we go. It's my Rebate 101 Primer. Please read carefully.

1) You will not get a rebate form in the box. You must print it yourself from the link provided that was provided on the sales blog or click here.

2) You will not get a receipt in the box. To print a receipt, go to My Account on sellout.woot and click on this product in your purchased list. You'll see a link to view your receipt. Print that page.

3) Read everything twice, fill everything out, read it again, check everything, make copies of it all, THEN and only then, seal the envelope. Almost all rebates have very exacting instructions and it's easy to forget something.

4) Wait. Rebates take a very long time to process. They are done by companies (not the manufacturer or woot) and this isn't the only rebate campaign they're working on.

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@grubber: "Watch the sawdust. If you are getting chips, you are good. If you are only getting dust, stop and sharpen. Takes a little time, but the cutting is faster and takes less effort."

To few people will realize the truth in your post. A sharp tool is also a safe tool.

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I got a Poulan 16" from Wally Mart and I start it once a season to make sure it is ready just in case. It always works and was $90. This doesn't seem that great of a deal.

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Anyone want to counter the complaints and convince me to buy this thing? I was all set to order this chainsaw to supplement my Stihl that needs minor repairs when I read the comments and reviews about hard starting and tendancy to die. The last thing I need is to struggle with a pull start with my bum shoulder.

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@woottacular5566: Thanks for the demo tool recommendations, which would no doubt come in handy for many other applications too.

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@nucleardrugs: Thanks for your story. In my area, Craigslist always has plenty of "nice piano free to a good home" ads, so I don't know if I'll have the same luck. I'll make a couple phone calls though - thanks again for the idea.

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@squirrelhawker: now THAT is funny. I snorted my beer thru the nose on that one! Well done.

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Leatherface would kill for one.

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I do not see that this can be used on Zombies. Boooo!
Sales just plummeted 10%

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if it were only 2 fer tuesday...imagine the possibilities.

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@taopina: As both a regular chainsaw user and devotee of all things zombie, I would be happy to advise you on the usefulness of this item in the inevitable zombie apocalypse.

First, and foremost, some words on the suitability of chainsaws in general during a zombie attack. A chainsaw can be awkward to wield under the best of circumstances. They are heavy (even the lighter models) and the centrifugal force that results from the rapidly rotating chain can make it difficult to control sudden swinging movements such as those necessary for decapitating hungry zombies. This doesn't even consider the possible detrimental effects of having zombie blood (or juices, as I like to refer to them) sprayed all over one's face from the aformentioned rapidly rotating chain.

If, given this, you still want to employ a chainsaw on zombies, you need to make sure that it is one that is easy to start and keep running. Yanking on a starter cord while fending off hungry zombies would not be good.

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Can this be used for a vasectomy? X

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looks like it works pretty well, I've always had good luck with this brand

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@chupas: The saw reviewed on Amazon doesn't have a purge prime bulb, and this one does. A big difference when starting a 2-stroke engine, because the carburetor gets fuel right away.

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@ginawoot: an 8lb "Maul" or "Woodsplitter" Axe will work great on that piano demolition. And they are about $35 at lowes.

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After the 2 heavy/wet snowstorms and several days of high winds this past month, we had to buy one (different brand) locally to cut up all the trees and branches that blew down. Northern CO got hit hard by all that weather, like some other sections of the country.

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@tesla33: have you ever actually used a chain saw?
the lubricating oil is NOT burned it is applied to the chain
via a feeder tube over the gears. COMPLETELY separated from
the combustion chamber of the motor. Yes, this saw does
use a 2 stroke motor that you mix oil/fuel together
but that is how the motor is lubricated. It has NOTHING to do
with the chain oiler

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Woot calls this "commercial grade", but the identical pre-rebranding saw at tanaka is described as an 'entry level homeowner saw".
http://www.tanaka-usa.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=TCS33Eb/16
I once had a Stihl "occasional use" chains saw that was the worst saw I've ever owned. I'd say that the overwhelming number of one star reviews on Amazon and the "entry level" status of this this add up to an evaluation of exasperating disappointing crap.
For about $170 you can get a 20 inch Poulan Pro that is easy to start, easy to service, well balanced, and durable. I have other saws but I no longer use them. There are few things more frustrating than a misbehaving chain saw when you are deep in the woods. If you want something for occasional use in your back yard, consider an electric chain saw (I have one that I use within 200 feet of the farmhouse for trimming firewood that doesn't fit in the stove or pruning cuts). I'd pass on this Hitachi/Tanika TCS33EB/16

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@murph929: I have a 16" Poulan and that's plenty for the home owner. If you have trees that require a bigger saw you may want to consider hiring a professional.

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Wish I had seen the Amazon reviews before I ordered this. Dang it ! Is there any way to cancel an order?

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I'm with a few other folks on here. Be damn careful. I grew up with chainsaws and power tools and learned early you have to respect them like a snake or a gun. Cept they're trickier. Go to an outdoor power equipment shop, buy what they recommend and make them show you how to use it. Otherwise hire somebody and drink beer on the porch while watching. Unlesss you think the nicknames "Stumpy" or "Lefty" are cool.

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Hope I don't need this for the turkey tomorrow. Can it be overnighted?

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Oh my nature Woot. You're allowing me to purchase a chainsaw!? You're the best! I promise to endanger only one limb at a time. :3

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@ginawoot: Professional piano movers will sometimes remove a piano at no charge if you give it to them. I have one in the basement of a home I purchased that was delivered before the garage walls were erected. Movers took off a door frame, removed the piano, replaced the door frame and had it on the truck before I brought them the Cokes I offered. I got lucky, it was an old no name upright, but the soundboard was good and it looked great.

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Oh, and on gas v. electric:

Electric saws tend to be less powerful than gas saws. If you just want to trim larger branches around the house, electric is fine. Otherwise...

You won't be using an electric saw to cut firewood out in the middle of nowhere or to clean up a fallen tree after a storm when the power is out. Even if you have power, if it's a bigger tree, an electric saw is going to run out of "oomph" on you.

If you intend to hire someone to do any major tree work you might have, then just stick with the electric. Otherwise, gas is the way to go.

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Hitatchi is a good name. If I hadn't just replaced my 16" Poulan with an 18" Husky, I'd consider buying this one.

16" is a great size for most uses. I've cut years and years worth of firewood with a 16" saw. It's much easier to wrangle than a larger saw, making it safer for less exeperienced users. Also, I think staying in the 16"-18" range is great for smaller people (like myself). My husband runs a 24" Husky saw and I CAN use it if I need to, but it's very difficult.

There's no need to be afraid of chainsaws, but they do require a healthy dose of respect. A little instruction from someone with experience using one should be all you need to ensure an ability to operate one safely. Also, wearing some protective gear like coveralls, workboots, and safety glasses will help prevent serious injury in the event you do make a mistake.

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Just in time for the holiday family get together!

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Apparently lots of jugglers in this crowd - 2% bought 3

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I almost bought this saw this summer, the 7 year warranty being the main selling point for me. This saw seemed to be the best bang for the buck out there and now Woots price is even lower.

The only problem was I could not find any place local that did warranty service on Hitachi power tools. Once you gas it up it is illegal to ship without all the extra paperwork. So for me it would basically have no warranty.

If I was still in the market I would jump on this deal, hopefully my 35 dollar craigslist saw still starts in the spring.

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Disappointed not to see a single comment advising me on the usefulness of this tool in a zombie apocalypse. Can anyone help out here?

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A 16" saw will cut most anything needed and is great for limbing. If you ever have a big trunk or stump to cut 30" or bigger go rent one. A big saw is heavy and not good for small stuff.

I agree, the reviews on this are not good. I have owned a number of saws from 14" to 20" mostly Poulan and Stihl. If money is no object then Stihl is the best, you do get what you pay for. I have had great service from several Poulans until I started using them for more than just homeowner stuff.

I was interested in this saw until I read the reviews, the plus side is it is light and easy to handle, bad is hard to start. Nothing like the Lithium drill they make. I would recommend looking at the Husquavarna saws - now sold at some of the big box stores and discounted. I see them on job sites and seem to be holding up well.

And if you need it once a year rent it. That way it will start when you use it.

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This would be waaaay handy after a storm... That's when all the "tree guys" have doubled their prices, and have more work than they'll ever get around to because the home insurance policies pay them well. And, if you can get to Home Depot, you'll find all their rentals have been taken.

Besides... there are just some things a guy has to take care of...

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I heat my home with wood and I use a 16 inch Stihl to cut wood for that. So a 16 inch saw will be big enough for most purposes. The saw I have runs $319 to $359, so this is quite a deal on that level but I have never used this brand. Those commenting how dangerous a saw can be are correct. It is one of the more dangerous tools you have in your garage. Whether you juggle it or not.

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Whatever chainsaw you get, learn how to sharpen the chain. I use the hand file and do 10 strokes per link every other tank. If you haven't sharpened in awhile, start with 20 strokes.

Watch the sawdust. If you are getting chips, you are good. If you are only getting dust, stop and sharpen. Takes a little time, but the cutting is faster and takes less effort.

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Did some quick research to find out who actually made it as I was pretty sure it wasn't Hitachi. Seems to be a Tanaka saw. http://www.tanaka-usa.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=TCS33Eb/16 is the one I think it is re-badged from. So your local Tanaka dealer should be able to take care of them out of warranty if they want to.

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It costs 25 bucks to rent a chain saw from home depot.
If you get 5 uses out of this, you got your money back.

I have had an electric chain saw (pole saw kit) for 6 years and replaced chain 4 times. It was $100.

Works great for avg homeowner duties.

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Not a bad deal on a good saw. The real problem is the gasoline. I've been using chainsaws for over 50 years and after ethanol was added to our fuel, these small engines clog at the drop of a tree limb. I wrote to my representatives to beg for ethanol-free fuel for this purpose. One of the comments was about a different product that quit after a couple of uses. I'll bet it was using fuel that contained ethanol. I now have to completely disassemble the carbs on these engines to rid them of the clogs only to have them clog again in just a few months. So sad.

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I can' t think of a worse scenario than dragging around a corded electric chain saw if you are doing any kind of serious cutting. As far as chain saws go get a Sthil, have had on for years, still cuts like new. To the lady looking to buy one for hubby, also get an extra chain when you get it and some good bar oil as well as quality two cycle oil for the gas. Nothing irritates me more than cheap tools, especially power tools that use gas. The new models of Sthil's are "tool less". No tools needed to change or adjust the chain, and they also have a version that is "easy start"? Not sure exactly their term for it, but you pull the starter rope and there is a slight delay and then it turns the engine over, works great, but read the instructions, as if you leave it on choke too many pulls it won't start, (floods)if you do per instructions it works fantastic. Sound like you are willing to spend the bucks to get him something nice, PLEASE do, he will appreciate it!

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@squidward: Yes, absolutely. Personal experience years ago, involving a neighbor who tried to use a chain saw and didn't realize how easily kickback can happen - it was horrendous.

Anyone who thinks they can use one of these without expert instruction and lots of practice is courting disaster. Please, please, everyone - be careful, just be very, very careful.

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Why not make them dual wield like yesterdays hedge trimmers?

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For homeowners with casual chain sawing needs -- Hire a tree man for a little more than this. Serious safety issues with chain saws, they are not for the occasional user.

I know two people hurt by chain saws. One had a humbling trip to ER, the other one died.

I had a tree guy come out to my place. I drank beer while I watched him scale the trees with ropes the way I never could have, prune them good, and took away the dead wood. For $300. Probably the best $300 I ever spent.

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What kind of knuckleheads would make a GREEN chainsaw? I mean, sometimes I have trouble seeing mine in the woods, and it's orange!

(Must be marketing people, and not actual chainsaw users, I suspect.)

Sheesh!

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@compudata:
Pictures or it didn't happen!