dealshitachi 16” purefire 2-stroke gas-powered chain…

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This will go perfect with yeseteday's Woot! hedgetrimmers...

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@theguruguys: I was going to say the same thing...

Seems Woot has a thing for things that cut things to pieces!

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Great for male therapeutic purposes too!

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My husband says he'd rather have a gun - get on it Woot!

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I know very little about chainsaws, but feel like it's one of those things I should probably have in the garage for those just-in-case moments.

This seems like a good deal, but is 16" kind of small for a chainsaw? Does anyone have this or one this size?

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Wait, is this $119 - $30 making it $89?

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Can I juggle these?

If not, I'll have to change the title to track 5 of my album..

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Perfect for your next massacre! =P

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Worried about Hitachi products had my leaf blower less than a month and it quit working

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@murph929: have taken down 45 foot oak treee with a 16 inch saw it was about 14 inches across

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@navowner: I've done the math, and it sounds like that can be done.

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@ccabell63: Did your leaf blower have a commercial engine? Biiig difference...

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@1298ty: You could attempt to juggle them. The success of the venture will depend on your juggling skill.

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16" is the perfect size for homeowner duties - but don't know anything about this brand of saw - they do make a pretty good TV -
perhaps you could get a rush shipping in time for Thursday's turkey carving

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@murph929 Good size for general cutting. Bigger chain saws can be difficult to manage unless more experienced. And it comes with a "scrench."

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@murph929: The size is fine for most cutting, but I prefer to use a 16" electric chainsaw, because there's no such thing as a "clean" two-stroke engine, and the electric saw never fails to start. The lubricating oil gets burned with the gas, and produces oily smoke. Saws used only occasionally tend to have the fuel go 'stale" and gum the carb up. If you have an outdoor outlet and just want a saw for household use, consider an electric.

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@navowner, et al: Perfect. In for one - especially now that I see the $30 rebate.

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Amateur filmmakers take note: This is a great time to restock your prop department!

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@tesla33: I'm more thinking for occasional use, but more importantly to have in case of disasters. Since a tornado or an early blizzard could also mean no power, I think gas might be the way to go. I'm guessing there's a way to properly store for long periods of time without causing too much damage?

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@murph929: is this a serious question? Just winterize it like any other gas operated machine?

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@thunderthighs: My juggling skills fall somewhere between those of an uncoordinated pedestrian and those of a slightly inebriated clown

Do I have a shot? I really want to impress this girl, and I've already bought the clown suit and everything!

Also, will the warranty cover "accidental circus-related damage"?

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@murph929: If you're not going to use it on a regular basis, you can use some Sta-bil or drain the fuel and run it until the carb is dry, then use fogging oil in the spark plug hole to prevent rust. Google how to winterize a 2-stroke motor for more details.

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I have a 73cc Makita and was interested in getting this for lighter duty... until I saw the reviews on amazon.

Majority says its cheaply made:
http://www.amazon.com/Hitachi-CS33EB-16-Gas-Powered-Anti-Vibration/product-reviews/B00387F6ME/ref=pr_all_summary_cm_cr_acr_txt?ie=UTF8&showViewpoints=1

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16" is a great size. You need to consider what you are cutting. I've had my Stihl 16" for 16 years and love it. Gas is the best way to go. Buy some "stabil" or other brand of gas saver and drain the tank once a year if you have not used it. 2 stroke Oil comes pre measured for 1 gallon cans. Super easy. Yes, electric has its place, but when there isn't electric... Plus the weight of the gas engine helps you cut downward. Don't know anything about Hitachi engines. I have a bulb primer on my weed eater, not on my chain saw. So, I would make sure you can get the engine serviced just in case. The chain and bar are available almost anywhere there are chainsaws. I have cut trees, firewood, shrubs, almost anything woody.

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@1298ty: Um, if you got the clown suit and are heading for the tower you can juggle all you want. We'll be running the other way.

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I have a 16" Hitachi, perhaps this model, not definitely, but mine is an absolute bastard to get running. Once it's going, you're golden, but it will wear you out starting it to the point where you just want to head back to the couch to saw wood indoors. For a single cut, a hand saw would seriously be less effort. I've used mine a half dozen times and never once got it running in under ten minutes. The first time, I was sure it was a dud, but after an hour or so's effort with my brother coaching over the phone, it finally caught. He said he'd never heard of my kind of trouble with a 2-cycle engine, but the internet all agreed when he searched MY model number: Hard to start. It is what it is. Caveat Emptor.

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Husband needs a new one. His 10 year old, excellent quality which I can't recall the name of, has been fixed 5 times in the past year. Then he winds up fixing what they calim to have done. Ridiculous. Not sure about the quality of Hitachi, off to do some surfing before I decide.

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@1298ty: I'm pretty sure I'm not allowed to comment on that for liability reasons. But if you do it, please video tape it.

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Wondering if this is a red herring?

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Would I be able to carve a 20 pound turkey with this?

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Hm, would this be a good way to dispatch a crappy upright piano that could otherwise exit only by mauling the plaster walls of a tight and twisty staircase? Alternative ideas (not involving explosives) welcome!

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Overnight shipping available? If so, I'm in for one so I can "cut" in line on Black Friday... rimshot

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@chupas: I read through the same reviews you apparently did. Rare I've seen that many 1 star reviews on Amazon. I'm going to wait and get my husband something better constructed. I would rather pay several $100s moree and get a good chainsaw. It's our 25th anniversary so I'm getting him a few tools and 2nd tool box also He doesn't like electric so that suggestion by another post is out too. Thanks for all the suggestions.

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Woot! recorded a conversation between my wife and I and used it in the description. There's no way that's fare use, Woot! I want royalties!

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And you thought using one hedge trimmer in each hand from yesterday's Woot! was an impressive feat of skill?!? In for two?

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@compudata:
Pictures or it didn't happen!

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What kind of knuckleheads would make a GREEN chainsaw? I mean, sometimes I have trouble seeing mine in the woods, and it's orange!

(Must be marketing people, and not actual chainsaw users, I suspect.)

Sheesh!

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For homeowners with casual chain sawing needs -- Hire a tree man for a little more than this. Serious safety issues with chain saws, they are not for the occasional user.

I know two people hurt by chain saws. One had a humbling trip to ER, the other one died.

I had a tree guy come out to my place. I drank beer while I watched him scale the trees with ropes the way I never could have, prune them good, and took away the dead wood. For $300. Probably the best $300 I ever spent.

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Why not make them dual wield like yesterdays hedge trimmers?

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@squidward: Yes, absolutely. Personal experience years ago, involving a neighbor who tried to use a chain saw and didn't realize how easily kickback can happen - it was horrendous.

Anyone who thinks they can use one of these without expert instruction and lots of practice is courting disaster. Please, please, everyone - be careful, just be very, very careful.

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I can' t think of a worse scenario than dragging around a corded electric chain saw if you are doing any kind of serious cutting. As far as chain saws go get a Sthil, have had on for years, still cuts like new. To the lady looking to buy one for hubby, also get an extra chain when you get it and some good bar oil as well as quality two cycle oil for the gas. Nothing irritates me more than cheap tools, especially power tools that use gas. The new models of Sthil's are "tool less". No tools needed to change or adjust the chain, and they also have a version that is "easy start"? Not sure exactly their term for it, but you pull the starter rope and there is a slight delay and then it turns the engine over, works great, but read the instructions, as if you leave it on choke too many pulls it won't start, (floods)if you do per instructions it works fantastic. Sound like you are willing to spend the bucks to get him something nice, PLEASE do, he will appreciate it!

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Not a bad deal on a good saw. The real problem is the gasoline. I've been using chainsaws for over 50 years and after ethanol was added to our fuel, these small engines clog at the drop of a tree limb. I wrote to my representatives to beg for ethanol-free fuel for this purpose. One of the comments was about a different product that quit after a couple of uses. I'll bet it was using fuel that contained ethanol. I now have to completely disassemble the carbs on these engines to rid them of the clogs only to have them clog again in just a few months. So sad.

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It costs 25 bucks to rent a chain saw from home depot.
If you get 5 uses out of this, you got your money back.

I have had an electric chain saw (pole saw kit) for 6 years and replaced chain 4 times. It was $100.

Works great for avg homeowner duties.

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Did some quick research to find out who actually made it as I was pretty sure it wasn't Hitachi. Seems to be a Tanaka saw. http://www.tanaka-usa.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Product_Code=TCS33Eb/16 is the one I think it is re-badged from. So your local Tanaka dealer should be able to take care of them out of warranty if they want to.

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Whatever chainsaw you get, learn how to sharpen the chain. I use the hand file and do 10 strokes per link every other tank. If you haven't sharpened in awhile, start with 20 strokes.

Watch the sawdust. If you are getting chips, you are good. If you are only getting dust, stop and sharpen. Takes a little time, but the cutting is faster and takes less effort.

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I heat my home with wood and I use a 16 inch Stihl to cut wood for that. So a 16 inch saw will be big enough for most purposes. The saw I have runs $319 to $359, so this is quite a deal on that level but I have never used this brand. Those commenting how dangerous a saw can be are correct. It is one of the more dangerous tools you have in your garage. Whether you juggle it or not.

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This would be waaaay handy after a storm... That's when all the "tree guys" have doubled their prices, and have more work than they'll ever get around to because the home insurance policies pay them well. And, if you can get to Home Depot, you'll find all their rentals have been taken.

Besides... there are just some things a guy has to take care of...