dealsmaglite heavy-duty 6-d cell flashlight, black…

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This is so 90s but still nice to have in the back seat of your car instead of a bat or crow bar when you need to justify possession to the judge.

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... and if one would like to convert to LED, extending battery life 20 hrs ... also eligible for prime
http://www.amazon.com/TerraLUX-TLE-6EX-MiniStar5-Replacement-MagLites/dp/B000B868NE/ref=pd_cp_hi_2

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Do people still buy Mag Lights?

I used to swear by them. But then LED's came along... I converted one of my old ones to LED (cost more than most LED flashlights do), but most of our flashlights are just random cheapos that seem to be just as bright.

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@tsfisch: The cheapos aren't indestructible batons.

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I load my led maglite with sanyo eneloop AA batteries with AA to D battery converter. Weighs a lot less, works for more than 4-5 hours (tested camping and had no problem) and most important rechargeable versus buying 3-6 new D batteries all the time. Just note the AA and D battery are the same voltage (1.5 volts each) but the D battery has more amps. Also if the connection is not good, add a bit of aluminum foil folded in the back to make good contacts with the battery.

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Yeah, a lot of people still buy them. Most of them are LED, now, and they're pretty good lights. They've even got a small LED light that looks more like the newer type LEDs. They're popular with modders, too. I've still got a 3aa, 2c with a drop in SSC or Cree LED, a 3D with dual MC-E LEDs, a 6D still in the package, and a new/mint 7C modded with a high output incandescent bulb (WAY brighter than stock.).

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I have a 6D cell, it's too dim, too heavy and the batteries too expensive to be anything other than a legal self-defense device for your car. Now I have a modern LED light on my key chain that is noticeably brighter or a pocketable Cree XM-L light that is about 7+ times brighter and rechargeable if I really need light.

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@riothero: the XM-L has a 260 lumens LED light at 700mA .. a D cell battery has up to 12000 mA capacity and the flashlight has 20,000 peak candlepower... One candela, for instance, is equal to about 12.57 lumens ... if one wanted the capacity for more light or longer life one may want to consider this classic rugged - heavy - flashlight.
I find resting it on my shoulder is comfortable.. and it is an excellent position for a downward strike ;)

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@riothero: You can get D to AA adapters, put some Sanyo Eneloops or similar pre-charged rechargeables, and get a drop in replacement LED light source. It will be MUCH lighter and WAY brighter with the drop in in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0H82VCOmI04

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Great for self defense, but not as a flashlight. If you want a flashlight, buy something from Stinger.

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Turn the maglite into a lightsaber with this: http://www.thecustomsabershop.com/D-cell-Mag-Lite-blade-holder-P514.aspx (and a couple other parts)

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@riothero: I brought HID flashlights at homedepot (Ryobi brand) for 50 dollars minus the battery and charger. It gets about an hour and is the same lightbulb found in expensive cars that cast the bluish tint. Its the only flashlight that works at range and luminosity needed well when you need a lot of light

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there has to be some "that's what she said" comments on this. Where are they?

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@jay481985: The ones that cast the bluish tint aren't the ones found on expensive cars, those are aftermarket bulbs. The ones with the bluish tint are the cheap, generic, Chinese HID bulbs. The ones that come factory installed on cars are white, and are higher quality bulbs, like those made by Phillips Sylvania. I've had several HID spotlights, also, and the cheaper ones also had a bluish tint (but those also had huge reflectors, like 10" ones, so they had killer throw), but the more expensive ones had a nice white or warmish white (4200k) light.

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@mtm2: see second comment for link to maglite for 24$

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@dazoneranger: Actually yes they are. I understand the difference between the two. The OEM are 4300 kelvin and are found from high end luxury cars. Europe requires a self leveling system that compensates for a loaded trunk or off bumps in the road while America does not require that but just a sharp cut off.

The current zeitgeist is to use a projector version versus the failed attempt when Audi/Phillips tried to use filters to cut off and caused beyond dazzle and caused a rainbow effect on passing by vehicles.

Since I meant oem we are talking about the 4300 kelvin bulbs. And yes they have a distinct bluish tone versus halogen which cast predominately in the yellow and orange spectrum which is why they are 3000 kelvin. I understand that you "tried" to inform me about the bluish lightbulbs which you interpreted as the 6000 or 8000 kelvin bulbs which are not only dangerous, produces less lumen than 4300 but is also illegal.

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@jay481985: I doubt your $50 Ryobi HID spotlight has a 4200 or 4300k bulb in it. I had an HID spotlight with a 4200k bulb in it and it did not look bluish at all and compared to my Costo HID with 6000-ishK bulb, it looked downright warm. My current car and previous car have factory HID headlights and they are very white. You're right, the higher temperatures are illegal on cars, at least hear in Cali, but I still see them on cars all the time.

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Just confirmed the bulbs in my car are 4300k and they are not at all bluish.

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@dazoneranger: Note I said bluish, not blue. 5000,6000,8000 are blue. 8000 being stupid blue, 5000 seeming acceptable. But in relative terms compared to 3000 kelvin halogen. they are "bluish"

Also note it does depend on the design of the housing as well. Certain housing causes prisming or refracting of certain colors. Being that blue/purple is the most shortest of visible light wavelength it tends to hit your eyes first. That is why when you compare oem hid headlights on a car with a halogen at distance the first color you notice is the blue dazzling effect.

Note I have a OEM HID headlamp. I also installed other versions on the other car which has a sharp cutoff point but is 5000 kelvin. Note that if you also compare versus light bulbs like florescent the "daylight" is 4200 kelvin, "bright white" is 3500 kelvin and regular is 2800 kelvin.

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@jay481985: Ok. Initially, since you said you HID was blue just like the ones on Luxury cars, I figured you were talking about the ones that are noticeably bluish, mainly because I assumed a $50 HID must have a higher temperature bulb, because all the cheap HID lights I've seen do. It might be possible that the Ryobi has a lower temp bulb, though, because they don't have to include any battery or charger inside the unit. Mine really look like a very neutral white, to me. I might get one of those Ryobis to check it out, as I've already got the charger and Li-ion battery for it. I didn't know they made that. I've long since sold all of my HID lights and flashlights, so $50 seems like a nice, cheap investment. Among the ones I used to have, I had this one http://www.batteryjunction.com/n30-3161.html and the light it produced didn't look at all bluish.