dealsh8-1213c 2tb 10gb 460w ps desktop (refurbished…

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Does anyone have any idea how these refurbs are from HP? I need to get my hubby a replacement system and this one looks pretty good. He makes poetry cartoon videos. So I'd say he needs a medium style gaming system. We'd have to beef up the ram, and maybe the video card, but otherwise it looks good.

Any suggestions please?
Thanks!

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@meow57: The HP factory refurb laptop I got from Woot! looked brand new in original packaging, with the only indication it wasn't new being the "refurbished" sticker on the outside of the box. I haven't purchased a refurb desktop here, but a similar experience seems likely.
A lot of manufacturer refurbs seem to actually be overstock (these have Win 7 on them and Microsoft probably gives PC manufacturers a discount for selling all "new" PCs with Windows 8 these days), but some might be from customers who changed their minds, or don't know how to use a computer, or units that had an actual problem and have been repaired and wiped and repackaged.

Also, for video creation/editing/etc this video card and the 10GB RAM would probably be just fine. You might get slightly better performance with large projects by going to 16GB RAM, but easy to add later if it's a problem. The slowest part is likely the hard drive. Adding an SSD could make it way faster, but large ones are pricey.

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@hellboy999: Probably off-leased systems. Company leases them for a while then returns, and boom. Surplus.

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Also, with only a 90-day warranty, I'd be sure to run it through its paces and make sure everything is working as expected early on. Or if worried, buy an extended warranty. In my experience, most of the time a system that runs well for a couple months is going to last years if you treat it well, avoid viruses and, blow out the internal fans and heat sinks with a duster can every few months, but there will always be an exception here and there. And of course making regular backups of important files is essential for all computer users. If you always ensure that your files are stored in more than one place at any given time (for example on the PC, and on a USB flash drive, or external hard drive or online backup service, or DVDs) then you'll be much better prepared if a hard drive fails. The drives are made by Seagate or Western Digital, etc, so the PC manufacturer has very little direct control over their reliability).

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@meow57: I don't know what you're talking about when you say you can't upgrade the video card. It should support any PCI Express x16 video card that will physically fit in the case without running into anything and that can be supported by an average-quality 460w power supply. There is a photo of the included GeForce GT 620 on this page under "Video graphics"
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/document?cc=us&dlc=en&docname=c03363679&lc=en&product=5231362#N509

Also, unless you are actually using it for real gaming (i.e. to play recent, graphically demanding 3D games on moderate to high settings) you don't even need a better video card.

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@kmartind: well, you see he's been use to having a 8800gtx. But that card went belly up so we replaced it with a radeon hd7750. That one doesn't work so well in his 5 year old system. But upon further reflection, I might be able to just swap out the gt620 for the 7750. Looks like it would fit the same. So maybe...now if I can just get him to accept the 'HP'' part ...he doesn't much care for them...

By the way, Tom's Hardware is an awesome site for keeping track of all these silly naming of video cards, among lots of other things!

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I actually prefer buying a refurb over a new system. The cost is usually much less, and it has gone through factory checkout at least twice, as a new one only goes through once.

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Own this exact computer... exact. Replaced the video card, added a second hard drive and a blu-ray burner and have not had to replace the power supply. Runs real good, quick. No complaints.

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@meow57: An HD 7750 should be OK with the stock power supply in this model fow power consumption. That's an ~55W card, and it looks like HP allows up to a 7770 (which is more like 80W) on current customized models of the H8 as long as you select the 460W or 600W power supply (but obviously not the 300W). I would definitely not recommend even trying the old 8800 GTX in it with the stock power supply though (even if it weren't fried); that's an older generation and very high power usage (like 180 watts) card but with less than half the performance of the 7750.

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This is a pretty good deal for what you get. If I needed a new PC right now, I'd jump on it. It has a very good and fast processor and more memory than you'll probably ever need. The graphics card wouldn't be great for gaming, but it wouldn't be awful either. My last two computers have been HP refurbs bought from Woot and I've had very few issues with them.

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Cant find any reviews, but everything looks good except the video card. There sure are a lot of these being refurbished for some reason.

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I bought a similar one a couple of months ago. After a windows update, I kept getting a "you might be a victim of software counterfeiting - please register this version of windows7" or something or other. I would go through the steps via the Microsoft website and everything would be good for a couple of days, then it would happen again. I ended up having to reinstall the os (which was no big deal, other than making sure that I had all essential files backed up somewhere else. I ended up installing a second 1.5Tb (that’s how bid the original HD was) in the case to be used as the dump for my weekly backups. Since the, they computer has run fine.

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After taking a good hard look at the guts, I don't see where we'd be able to replace the video card with a beefier one. So, this is a no go for me.
Onward with the search!

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FYI, its sold out. Personally, though, I wouldn't buy a modern computer with only a 90 day warranty. Parts aren't made the way they used to. Cheap power supplies and hard drives that often fail within months of purchase.

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Wow, $650 for a PC without a decent video card? I'd NEVER pay that unless you ABSOLUTELY NEEDED a Core i7. Here's what you should do. Buy a much cheaper ($300 or less) PC, add some RAM if needed (you probably don't need more than 4 GB) and buy a high quality SSD. You're system will be a whole lot faster in the end than this thing. Companies like Dell no longer create high quality products and the support is not going to be there.

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@kirkhilles: First time I've ever seen the words "DELL" and "HIGH QUALITY" in the same sentence. Thanks for the laugh bro!