dealshp pavilion h8 intel i7 desktop pc with 2 tb hard…

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HP Pavilion H8? You mean like all the H8 I have for HP's shoddy build quality? hah

In all seriousness, this isn't a bad deal. This would actually get away with running Battlefield 3 once you upgrade the power supply. That's the only downer on this system.

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This is a pretty good deal. It's too bad buy.com has you beat out this time, though, woot. Only by 55$ though.

http://www.buy.com/prod/hp-pavilion-h8-1027c-desktop-pc-intel-core-i7-2600s-2-8ghz-up-to-3/225640064.html

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It's a decent deal, the harddrives only spin at 5400rpms and there are only two slots for RAM, so future upgrades are limited. So after buying a new HDD and a new power supply you would be better off building your own @ newegg or tigerdirect.

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@knyle: Are they really the same computer. One has a model number of H8-1027c (buy.com) and the other H8-1012c (moofi). What's the difference? A quick look at the specs, they seem very similar.

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Overpowered processor and gfx for the chipset. Might as well go with an i3 and a 4000 series gfx card.

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@kinyl - good looking out on the Buy.com deal. Plus I won't have to pay the sales tax I get hit with from Woot. In for one.

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this actually looks like a decent deal, price is pretty spot on for the components. the buy.com offer is certainly a better deal

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I am looking into the buy.com link right now.

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@elition: i've always thought about building my own system, but have no idea where to start. any recommendations on books to read or websites to review?

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@brutherford: +1 to woot if they decide to beat the price!

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dear woot, Are you going to step up and beat the buy.com price????

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This PC is like having a Chevy Aveo with a $5000 stereo system and 20" rims. A couple really nice features on something that's severely hindered when you dig a little deeper.
http://www.amd.com/us/products/desktop/graphics/amd-radeon-hd-6000/hd-6570/pages/amd-radeon-hd-6570-overview.aspx#3
Right from AMD's page. The Radeon 6570 requires a minimum 400W power supply. Add this video card with a higher-end i7 Intel processor and it really makes you scratch your head as to why HP put a 300W power supply in this PC.

And a TWO terabyte hard drive! Awesome!.....Until you dig a little deeper and see it's only a 5400RPM hard drive. Are you kidding me? Did HP have an overstock of large laptop hard drives or something?

And as mentioned, it only has two memory DIMMs. So upgrading the amount of memory is out of the question unless it comes with a single 8GB stick (which I highly doubt). Or unless you want to ditch this memory altogether and swap in two 8GB sticks of your own (pricey).

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@twowootthree: tomshardware.com and anandtech.com are HUGE websites with equipment reviews/comparisons/shootouts to forums to the latest news flashes. They might look a little over your head to start with, but with a little time, they'll soon be your lifelines. :-)

newegg.com is really THE BEST website to purchase your PC components.

And my personal recommendation. Nothing really beats the Intel i5-2500K processor paired with a motherboard featuring the Z68 northbridge chipset. If you're into gaming, the Radeon HD 6850 is an outstanding bang for the buck. Add your choice of memory and hard drive (mechanical or solid state) and you're ready to blow most anyone out of the water.

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Processor: Intel® Core™ i7-2600S 2.8 GHz Quad Core With Tubo Boost (Up to 3.8 GHz)

So if I use this machine to edit music, it will boost the brass section? :O

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Looks like there was a pricing issue with the buy.com sale above and it has been pulled.

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@firebirdude: I meant Radeon HD 6950 at the end. Typo. Sorry. :-)

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@firebirdude: Minimum PSU requirements are only a suggestion. Anandtech didn't break 200 W for the TOTAL system using a 6570 and their rig used a power hungry i7-920. Seen here http://www.anandtech.com/show/4278/amds-radeon-hd-6670-radeon-hd-6570/15. The Sandy Bridge CPUs use much less power. Nonetheless, the PSU here probably isn't so great, but it will work. The HDD is slow though, yeah.

Z68 and P67 are pretty similar, unless someone needs SSD caching (unlikely) or the virtu stuff, P67 often has better parts for the same price (some of the build quality gets cut sometimes to allow for the z68 stuff)

AMD Radeon HD 6850/6870/6950 as well as the Nvidia GTX 560Ti are all good gaming graphics cards. If not gaming, sandy bridge's IGP is fine enough for everyday office/internet stuff.

For someone looking to build, us.ncix.com can be a pretty good site to purchase some of the components. They have weekly sales often beating the newegg price (i5-2500k was $190 for the past couple weeks)

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@brad3326: Interesting note on the power usage of their rig. Awfully efficient. Though note it uses one hard drive, no overclocking, optical drive, etc. Also keep in mind any power supply rarely meets the power stated. Antec, Corsair and other trustworthy brands hover around their marks. But no-name power supplies, like the one likely used in these pre-configured machines, are never close. Props for the link, but in the end, this 300W power supply is still too small.

The Z68 is newer and includes the best parts of the P67 and H67 chipsets, as well as the other features you've already mentioned. If a user wants IGP, the Z68 will work. If they have a dedicated video card and wants to overclock, the Z68 will do that too. It's simply the best choice for everyone. Plenty of great Z68 motherboards out there hovering around $100... the exact same price as the P67 motherboards. And an ill-founded claim that build quality is suffering on all Z68 boards to keep costs down is just ridiculous.

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Whoa. Rather than beat the deal, Brutherford reached out and had Buy.com's superior deal pulled. Did you make them a deal they can't refuse?

Interesting that the Buy.com deal was posted by Wootbot 4 days ago but a quick "investigation" by Brutherford results in a "pricing error" and the deal is pulled. - said sneeringly as he twists his Movember moustache

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Another more common answer is that once buy.com sold out of their good deal, then it probably was just removed as an option & no longer available like most web sites do.

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@firebirdude or other tech smart woot people,
I have this HP coming from buy.com but I also ordered this http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16883220058 from Newegg. Would you mind doing a comparison and tell me which you feel is the better machine. Thanks in advance and thanks for advice already supplied.

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@prplmtngal: The Asus machine in the newegg link features an AMD X6 1035T processor, 1TB 7200RPM hard drive and the Radeon HD 5750 video card. The Moofi HP machine features an Intel i7-2600S processor, 2TB 5400RPM hard drive and the Radeon HD 6570 video card.

The video card in the Asus machine DOES slightly edge out the video card in the HP in just about every application. But it's very close. However, the processor in the HP pretty much dominates the Asus. Even in applications where AMD's architecture is known to do its best, the Intel still wins.

In the end, I'd take the HP. Far better processor. I'd use the 2TB 5400RPM hard drive for strictly storage, then buy a small solid state hard drive to actually "run off of". A 60GB can be had for about $75 now and they're MUCH MUCH faster than even a 7200RPM hard drive.

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@chezteladog: Careful, if you keep poking around you just might disappear like the buy.com deal... J/K.

But seriously, I can make that happen...

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@firebirdude: It's a bad PSU, that's for sure, but it's not going to blow up. If anyone were to change/upgrade the specs, PSU should be on the top of the list, but it will work. At least for a little while.

The Z68 chipset allows for the integrated graphics to be used with a graphics card, an uncommon situation, but helpful for trouble shooting among other things. (Maybe a 3rd monitor with an nvidia card? not sure). The Z68 allows for overclocking of the IGP on the sandy bridge GPU, any mobo can OC a discrete card using software. Overclocking the IGP isn't as useful as ocing the discrete.

Z68 is a perfectly good chipset and definitely not all of the corners were cut on all of the boards, just some of the budget ones have a few less VRMs, so if one isn't planning on using caching/virtu/igp, P67 remains a perfectly good option. Most of the boards above entry level are identical, but some were only slightly weaker when first introduced.

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@firebirdude Much appreciation for that comparison. My intuition led me to jump on the HP this morning at Buy.com even though i had already purchased the Asus this past Saturday. Then buyers remorse and confusion settled in. You have cleared things up immensely, Thanks very much.
I've been intrigued with solid state drives since I watched a Ted Talk on them, so now I get to play around with that. I already have a 500w power supply to drop in and will now be getting a small SS drive for it also.
Earlier today I said to my friend that before I die, I would like to build my own machine. I tinker well but find computer guts a bit intimidating. People like you make me believe I am capable of building my own rig. Yay!

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Don't be the bonehead who buys this deal. Wait until it sells out on woot and then go back a few days later to buy.com and check for it. I am 99.99% positive the listing with the lower price will be reactivated on buy.com soon after the woot one sells out.

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@prplmtngal: Thank you. :-)

Building your own PC is not hard at all. It's only 8-9 parts that all fit together. tomshardware.com does a running article about once a quarter on the best bang for the buck DIY PC's for $500, $1000 and $2000.
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/build-a-pc-value-overclock,3033.html
If you'll scroll down a little, you'll see the parts selected for September 2011. If nothing else, that shows you all the parts you would need to build a computer. All the parts either snap in place or attach with a few basic phillips screws. Then it's just running the wires from the power supply to each component and a couple easy cables from the hard drive and optical drive to the motherboard. Insert Windows disc. Done and done.

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@firebirdude: Thanks for the link. I worked in a small computer store back in the late 90's and built all of my computers through 2005, but haven't kept up with hardware specs since then. I'm planning to build a new machine over the holidays and putting it off because of the daunting task of researching components. This is an awesome link for me!!!

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Woot.com and Buy.com are affiliated and have been for many years. That probably has a lot to do with Buy.com's pulling of the comparable computer rig. There are a couple of threads on Woot that sheds some light on the arrangement. You could probably google more if you wanted.

http://www.woot.com/forums/viewpost.aspx?postid=2425726

http://www.woot.com/Forums/ViewPost.aspx?PostID=3118833

The second link has a concise response from Woot staff regarding their buy.com relationship.

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@24601: Awesome :-) Glad you got some use out of it.

All in all, PC building is still very similar to what it was in 2005. Basics are still the same.

A crash course to bring you up to speed on the latest and greatest: Intel's second-gen processors (dubbed Sandy Bridge) are the bees knees. Not in a flashy fad craze type of way, but in a legit dominate the market type of way. Here's some proof
http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/desktop-cpu-charts-2010/benchmarks,112.html
The i5-2500K has been crowned the best bang for the buck by far. Darn fast out of the box, but completely unlocked so you can overclock it WAY up there if that's your thing.

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Solid State Drives are another recent breakthrough. As you can imagine, MUCH faster than mechanical hard disk drives. Here's some proof
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ssd-upgrade-hdd-performance,3023.html
They've already come down quite a bit in price and I suspect the "price-skimming" technique is now complete. It's a good time to buy if you want one.

That's about it as far as "game changing" breakthroughs in the industry. DDR3 memory has been in full swing for awhile now. Hate to say all brands are the same, but on the whole, yeah...pretty much the same. Tons of great motherboard manufacturers out there now. If you choose a Sandy Bridge CPU, then a motherboard with Z68 chipset is the latest and greatest. Best for any application you'll use it for. Cases are still cases. PSU mount on the bottom now for better airflow. lol But still the same on the whole.

Let me know if you need anymore help. :-)