deals60% off the u-cleaver multi-purpose blade: one…

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Well according to the website it's comfortiable.

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In light of the Apocalypse comments above here is a sneak peak at our newer still in production video:

http://www.ucleaver.com/product/UC-01CLEAVERCASE/

THE U-CLEAVER

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picture shows it with the sheath, but the price is without? wtf?

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Upvote for a unique design, looks like it really could be an effective tool.

Downvote for killing the poor innocent green trees.

Okay... I didn't vote.

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Not better than a machete. In fact worse if you need to chop through something.

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@chandin: Axes generally have a wider blade to split things apart as you chop, whereas a machete is designed to only need to chop once or twice and go most of the way through in one hit
Axes are better for harder things like wood and bone

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I'm a sucker for unusual knives. Not the wonky 'more pointy bits than sense' Gil Hibben types, but ones with something unique about them.

Sure, in for one.

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Oh, and take note folks: This is a product launch. They won't ship until mid-April, so a bit of patience may be needed.

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@robinbobcat: This is true. I hope the people at Ucleaver understand that they cannot charge purchasers credit card until the product has shipped (per Mastercard, Visa and Discover card's merchant agreement.)

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I can't think of a situation where you would actually choose to carry/use this over another, better-suited tool. HOW would you carry it? It chops a fish in half... yay. Every tool I own that can chop through a 4" tree can also chop a fish in half (as well as a carrot and an apple). How does it clean a fish? Make feather sticks? Baton firewood? Useful in the kitchen? Is it more useful than any other kitchen knife that I own, all of which are much easier to handle and control? How does it slice cheese, peel a potato, dice an onion?

If you collect unusual knives or just dig BudK-esque crapola, go for it. But this just looks stupid to me.

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"First Units Will Ship 4/20/2012"

(snicker)

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This knife design really isn't that unique as the Alaskan Inuit people have been using knives like this for skinning and other uses.

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Did anyone else notice that the promotional quote is from MacGruber?
"This revolutionary new blade design is as a comfortiable in the kitchen as it is in the wild!" - MacGruber (comfortiable!)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1470023/

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I was interested in this(as a kitchen cleaver), until he turned two green trees into waist high punji sticks. This looks like a great idea for a kitchen knife but stick to the Tom Brown Tracker if you want a survival tool.

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@marinarawr: You would be crying even harder if you could see what a nice fire they made. Oh how I long for the days when men could cut down a tree in there own back yard without having to live with the cyber guilt of such cruelty to plants...

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Unspecified material - 'high carbon hardend steel', ship date of 'Mid April' (or 4/20/2012 if you believe the bottom of the page), bonehead design - great for bruising knuckles while trying to chop, holes in the blade to catch debris, slippery laminated wood handle - it is a horror story waiting to happen to actually use it as a tool.

That said - it'd probably look pretty cool in a starter's knife collection.

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I have no problem with you cutting down green trees in your backyard, but I agree.. It'd be a heck of a lot easier with an axe, and if you're working on clearing all of that, then fire up the chainsaw, and be done in about the time it took you to cut that 2nd tree.

It's telling that at the beginning of that video, we see that you have a bowie knife on your belt.

In the kitchen, my go to tool is a chef's knife; in the bathroom, a razor; elsewhere in the house, a box cutter; in the yard, a bypass lopper. Outside of the house, I have the Kershaw Drone which I bought from Woot a month or so ago for everything from opening packages to cutting loose threads off clothes.

I don't see how the U-Cleaver would improve upon or otherwise replace the blades I already use.

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@first2summit: The video describes it as a cross between the Inuit design and a cleaver - the 'U' comes from the Inuit blade name (which I didn't catch).

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The design of the site looks familiar lol

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@atd15: Not sure what site you're thinking of, but it looks pretty bush to me. Not a single clear picture of the tool itself, and clicking on any of the smaller pics (hoping to open a larger version), just adds an item to your cart. The "U-Cleaver 360 Degree View" is just a low detail drawing that looks like it was done in a couple minutes in SketchUp.

As far as being 60% off the "regular" price of $49.99... what a strange thing to say on an item's product launch, an item that has never been sold before and doesn't even exist outside of SketchUp and (probably) the single mock-up shown in the tree-chopping video and "Review" video (which TOTALLY looks like a legit review, btw).

"High Carbon Hardened Steel" - Really? What does that mean? What kind of steel, exactly, is it? Elsewhere you say it's "hand forged with hardened steel". Is it hardened first and then hand-forged? I'm lost. It looks pretty shiny for "high carbon hardened steel". Is it plated? What is the handle made of?

...

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What I got from their demos:

"It chops! But wait, there's more! It also chops! You can even chop slowly! But say you need to chop something. Well, it does that!"

But hey, it looks interesting. I think this would suit a woodsman better than a chef, though.

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I use a cleaver in a kitchen frequently, so this analysis is from the perspective of anyone wanting to cut meat. My first observation is that the handle is extended right behind the blade. This means that, were I using this tool to chop bone in anything large (pig, cow, lamb, etc.), I have to really open up cuts made by my boning knife so that my follow through doesn't catch any meat on either side. The alternative is a poor cut and ugly chops. Next, if it's super sharp and I'm trying to hammer through bone with it, I'm going to have to sharpen it constantly. If it's not super sharp I just feel cheated. Finally, the grip looks both too thick and like it's interrupted by the blade. That's going to make it hard to hold, especially if it keeps getting splattered in meat juices and fat. So in the end I have a knife I can't hold that I have to sharpen all the time and produces an inferior product when compared with my old butcher's cleaver.

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Thank you Wooters for the great way to kick off The U-Cleaver. I know there are a lot of skeptics above. I think the people that got in on the 19.99 deal are going to be more than happy and will report back.

We had an overwhelming response and we are happy to get our first product out to the people here on WOOT. Enjoy and be sure to report back. We have to RIP the $19.99 deal but we will keep the price for now at $39.99. Enjoy! We hope that you all have a great April.