dealsmonoprice ethernet over power powerline converter…

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First there was power over ethernet. Then there was ethernet over power.

Next you'll see power over ethernet over power:
For $500 and a huge stack of adapters, you can send 12VDC over your 120VAC power lines at 1Gbps.

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I am not sure if this is much of a "deal". A best rated TrendNet Powerline adapter with 200 Mbps at NewEgg costs $49.99 + $1.99 shipping. And it is supported by TrendNet, a well established networking company.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833156390

Another well-priced and well-rated one is from TP-Link that I think Woot sold a while ago, $44.99 with free shipping. Also rated for 200 Mbps.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833704164

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@lll0228: You are correct, I have the Netgear version of these and added the TrendNet ones. Surprisingly they talk to each other, and I can control them using the Netgear's console. BTW, Newegg lowered the price of the TrendNet ones to $44.99 + $1.99 shipping, making it more attractive than these.

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If you don't have one already you'd have to buy a pair, right? $89.92+shipping

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@mrt20: These come in pairs, at least the TrendNet and the Netgear ones are for this price.

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@twodayslate: Plug them into the outlet and they will use your electrical wire as an "Ethernet" line. Connect one to your router and the other to any outlet in your house, as long as it is within the same breaker box. These work great and will recommended. and you can move them all you want and will always talk to the transceiver.

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@johnhatchett: True, but that is only for one and not the kit so you end up paying $115 for two. Unless you buy this one which is the kit for $87 http://www.amazon.com/ZyXEL-Powerline-Wall-Plug-Adapter-PLA4215KIT/dp/B006L6X7PM/ref=pd_cp_pc_2

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@lll0228: It's a "deal" because the price is good and the company is solid. You probably haven't heard of them, but that doesn't make them irrelevant. If you hate Monster, you'll love Monoprice.

http://www.resellerratings.com/store/monoprice
http://www.buzzfeed.com/jwherrman/how-monoprice-is-eating-the-tech-world-from-the-in
http://www.monoprice.com/

DO NOT WANT.
http://www.monsterproducts.com/productdisplay.asp?pin=5476&id=8911

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Yea tittle is badly named. For a second I thought it was PoE Power over Ethernet. but it is just boring networking over power lines.

From the research I have read the actual bandwidth is really low compared to the advertised prices. I think the 200Mbps get an average of 30Mbps if not less and the 500Mbps ones are not much faster.

I would only recommend them for minor data use like Netflix devices etc... but for any serious data transfer you might as well wire it or get a bridge. (As WIFI bridges are are ment to receive multiple streams of wifi vs a dongle or laptop.)

http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9127759/Review_5_power_line_devices_that_take_you_online_where_Ethernet_or_Wi_Fi_can_t_

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@drigout: Agree, these are good for regular internet connectivity or normal use, but if you want heavy streaming or data transfer a bridge is the way to go. These are convenient for hard to reach WiFi area or where adding an Ethernet line is out of the question. I have one used to extend a WiFi, since I have a wall of solid concrete blocking my wireless signal, so I use these along with an extra wireless router to get passed this limitation.

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Do these have issues with the house phases if one side of the house is on one phase of 220 and the other side is on another phase? I really don't want to have to have my 220 dryer running to connect the phases whenever I need a network connection.

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@hayedid: With today's technology, they are auto-switch, I had been able to use my Netgear adapters in France when I visit my friend, since the walls are very thick and the signal doesn't reach the second floor. So I would not worry about this. You just need a plug converter for the different plugs. Plus these have no interaction with the electricity, they only use the wire to send the signal, which is transparent to your electrical current, same as when electricians use a toner to trace a line.

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As a long time tech and prior tech equipment reviewer... these devices never live up to the full speeds shown. With an active power outlet, they average around 10% of the rated speeds, so a 200Mbps set tend to see at best in the 20-30Mbps range. If there is even 1 breaker between the 2 and it drops further to the 5-10Mbps range.

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@screwballl: Absolutely, I see these more as a convenient way of connecting wired to the internet when wireless signal is an issue without the mess of wires. Still at 20mps, it is fairly fast to the average internet users. BTW I do have the NETGEAR XAVB101 which is old and I get an average of 90 - 150Mbps across two breakers (one is servicing the circuit where the router is and the other is on another circuit servicing my porch), luck? maybe, but no complaints on speed whatsoever. Even my downloads average at 150Mbps (1.5 MBps as I have a 6 MBps internet line), even after going through a bridge.

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Would this work well with a DirecTV DVR to connect to on demand shows/movies?

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I had the Netgear version of these and it's really hit or miss whether they'll work for you. When I actually did get them to stay connected, the speeds were worse than a T1 (1.5 Mbps). I think I saw the LEDs claim a 10Mbps connection for a few minutes, but the computers certainly weren't transferring at that speed.

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@jersully: I know Monoprice well, and while their audio/video products and some computer accessories are very good value, their networking or IT related products that require support/firmware updates tend to be very poorly supported.

For products like that, I'd stick with the established networking companies like Netgear, TP-Link etc.

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@hondac95: They do talk to each other, because they all conform to the IEEE standard 1901 (otherwise they can't claim to be "HomePlug AV" compatible). Yes, they all talk to each other.

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I have concerns that piping RF over your power-line would add additional noise on the line. My X-10 devices (different freq.) are usually reliable but every once in awhile they go berserk and lights turn on or off due to power-line disturbances. I'd avoid these. Use a wireless router or access point operating in the 5.8GHz band. This eliminates problems usually associated with crowding and interference in the 2.4 Ghz band. In my opinion this was a bad idea to begin with.