dealsocz solid 3 sld3-25sat3-480g 480gb solid state…

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vote-for1vote-against

This specific drive does not appear on Tom's Hardware SSD hierarchy chart. There is a 120GB OCZ Solid drive that is Tier 8, but this drive is much bigger, and would not necessarily be the same level. There are no 480GB drives on the list. This drive is twice the size of any drive on the list.Not sure any comparison is valid.

vote-for2vote-against

Look, if you go to Amazon and you find people give it five stars after they RMA' d it because it was DOA, or people are complaining it died after six months, or people say they had to call tech support to get it running, or people say you have to reinstall Windows to upgrade the firmware you have a very easy decision – Don't Buy It!

Compare with SanDisk Extreme 240 GB.

vote-for1vote-against

I've read several complaints with OCZ SSD's; however, I've had two and have had zero problems so far. My current is an Agility 3 240gb loaded with Windows 7. I had to take the time to make sure the firmware was upgraded prior to installation, and I took a good bit of time learning how to install a SSD (as far as Windows and BIOS settings). The Agility 3 has been running fine for about six months now with no problems. If a different drive were available at a similar price, I would probably buy the different drive simply because of the amount of negative responses that so many people show towards the OCZ's. Like I said, I've had two so far with no problems and am going to install an Agility 4 on my laptop.

vote-for1vote-against

@willyj73: Sample size = 1. Every PC peripheral works on at least one configuration. Basically, a boot drive is a is a special case. You have to move all your settings, all your data, and all your programs are going to be trashed. So you better have the media and the activation codes if they require that. Otherwise you have to download everything. And if you have like Windows 7, you can count on a ton of downloads including service pack one which may or may not go smoothly. My point: a lot of freaking work. (I would never buy a new superfast boot drive and just clone all my old crap onto it.)

Now, if it's DOA, or otherwise doesn't work correctly you have to muck around seeing if there's something in the bios not set right, etc. And then you call up tech support and have to go through a bunch of freaking menus just to sit on hold until some tech comes on to tell you to try new cables, maybe the cables are bad, etc. The number of things that could go wrong are too numerous to list.

vote-for1vote-against

Sample size in my case is 3 (still insignificant in the overall scheme of things but 75% of the OCZ SSDs I've purchased) but if I were in the market for an SSD, I'd stay away from OCZ -- any SSD that requires going back for "service" (i.e., you get another, "refurbished" unit), sometimes returned 3 times, well, you get the picture. They're cheap for a reason.

vote-for1vote-against

My installs were fresh installs on a new build, so I had to install and activate everything regardless. The laptop is going to take some time. I've installed two OCZ's with zero problems, not one. Working on number three.