dealscorsair hydro series h60 (cwch60) high…

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Just to note there are two versions of this product on Newegg, the older version is the one that has the rebate. Looks like the most important difference between the two is socket support, so be sure that your socket type is covered by whichever one you buy.

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My computer, 8320 running @ 4.4, is in the basement and with this unit according to Core Temp it idles at 12c using Arctic Silver. Never breaks 48c after an hour of OCCT.

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Umm... how cold is your basement? 45F?

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You are never going to have an air or water cooled cpu running at less than ambient temperature, the heat has to go somewhere. If Core Temp is telling you it is, there is likely something wrong with either the temperature sensor or Core Temp’s interpretation of it’s reading.

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you kids and your silly cheap water kits. water is a waste of time since noctua came around.

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@sharpjm: Cheaper water kits have their place in some builds, especially builds too thin to support a large air cooler like Noctua.
I've thought about going to water so that I could pump the heat directly out of the case, but I'm pretty sure the hot air from my cpu cooler can find it's way across the inch and a half gap to the rear fan.

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@jonholifield: Absolutely. I use an H60 because I'm running a mini itx setup (BitFenix Prodigy). Many high performance air coolers don't fit in the case, or get in the way of the RAM/GPU on the tiny packed mobo, or the backplate doesn't fit because there's no cutout, etc etc. Using watercooling freed up a lot of space because the waterblock easily fits in the reference area and the big radiator can go somewhere out the way.

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@jonholifield: This is due to the way core temps are measured. They're measured as a diference from the TJ max, so as temps get lower, the margin of error drastically increases.

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@youtookmyactualname: That does make sense that the temperature reading would be calibrated to read correctly on the high end as that is where the processor would be damaged; however, I would still wouldn't trust the reading of a sensor that is at least 10 degrees C off at the low end.
Of course, if you care much about the temperature in desktop processors then you are probably overclocking and accept the risk that you may loose a processor :D