dealszapi ultra violet toothbrush sanitizer and holder…

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My wife bought one of these. It takes me forever to clean our 3 toilets now! Also, what's up with keeping it on the counter? GROSS!

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Yes, UV can sterilize surfaces; the theory behind the product is solid. However the problem is that it must shine on a surface to have an effect. Anything in a shadow, or behind something that bends the light out of its path will not be affected. I'd imagine that a lot of the bristle surface isn't reached by light. I'm not sold on the efficacy of this product.

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I bet you can pick up a good used one at a much better price. I am going to wait for one of those... It may add more flavor to my toothbrush and you know if has been through the QA department twice.

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@bsirvio: I loved that museum. I went when he was in the smaller location further in the building and after he had moved to the bigger space near the front.

I have not been since he donated the collection to the Science Museum, but I wonder how good it could be without McCoy describing everything.

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does sunlight have UV? just leave it on the sun, right?

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UV lights (often nothing more than fluorescent lighting for cool visual effect) to kill bacteria and improve overall wellbeing is something that was prominently featured in the erstwhile Minneapolis Museum of Questionable Medical Devices. If it was quackery then, it's quackery now.

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I just rinse my toothbrush and then put it in a small jar with enough alcohol to cover the brush.
I expect that would kill most of the bacteria.

When ready to brush, I just rinse off the alcohol, load it with toothpaste, and there ya go!

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@wilfbrim: Note it also says:

"Soaking toothbrushes in an antibacterial mouthrinse after use has also been studied and may decrease the level of bacteria that grow on toothbrushes"

For those of us with lowered immune systems from PPIs, every little bit is a big concern.

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The American Dental Association (ADA) does not recommend the use of toothbrush sanitizers. Specifically, they state : "Cleaning methods beyond those outlined above are not supported by the currently available clinical evidence. While there is evidence of bacterial growth on toothbrushes, there is no clinical evidence that soaking a toothbrush in an antibacterial mouthrinse or using a commercially-available toothbrush sanitizer has any positive or negative effect on oral or systemic health."

http://www.ada.org/1887.aspx

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Yes, bacteria live on your toothbrush, but they are bacteria that came out of your mouth. They live there. The CDC and the AMA say that there's no evidence that this is a health concern. The ADA says to ust rinse your toothbrush and let it air dry and you'll be fine.

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Bacteria DOES build up in your toothbrush and breed over time (which is why they recommend you change brushes every few months). However, I just leave mine upside-down in a cup of watered-down listerine. I don't think anything would survive that, and it helps keep the bristles moist and flexible, so they don't hurt my gums when I start brushing.

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Your mouth will be germier than your brush if you use tooth paste, rinse and air-dry post-brushing.
This is a waste of money unless you:
1 Share your toothbrush with your dog
2 Leave it with a toddler and a toilet
3 Use it to detail your fish tank
4 You get the drift...

See: http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/the-ugly-truth-about-your-toothbrush?page=2

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@marvelljones You're absolutely right. My main concern is actually the creation of resistant strains of bacteria due to the overuse of antibiotics and antibacterial products. People who sell products like these are just profiting from people's fear and paranoia, but it's entirely possible that in the grand scheme of things, they're contributing the problem they're claiming to solve.

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@fit410s: why batteries? can you not plug it to an electric outlet?

k87 k87
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@jazzsinger: Only those with autoimmune disorders to begin with. It's like a lot of devices on the market these days, it plays into people's paranoia about bacteria and germs.

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Man, there are a lot of people around here looking to throw away $15 on nothing. In the history of the world, how many people have ever become seriously ill from an infection they got from their toothbrush? I'm sure someone has, but is it really common enough that it's worth spending $15 to protect yourself from it?

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I own this. Got it as a gift a year ago. It uses something like 2 AA batteries. Its well made and easy to use. UV light has been proven to work, so I highly recommend it.

I use mine every few days. More use then about 95% of the stuff I have.

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Go ahead and buy this device if you want to feel better about hygiene. I brush my teeth with a Hobo's big toe. I am sure this will protect you from the poop spray from your toilet.

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Check Amazon for the scathing reviews on these things. (There have been a lot on Woot in previous sales as well, but I'm too lazy to search for them at the moment.) The main issues seem to be: 1) water from your toothbrush leaks into the electronics, causing intermittent operation; 2) said water causes mildew/mold growth inside the unit; 3) they eat batteries; 4) the average lifespan of the unit is a few months or less.

I don't own one, so I can't tell you for sure that these complaints are true. I was going to purchase one a while back and then decided not to after reading so many negative reviews.

But hey, good price.

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BTW, prices elsewhere are between $25 and $35. Reviews are between average and meh.

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White, blue, purple, pink - all NEW? Really, nobody wanted to use them yet? Not even the pink one? All new!?