dealsvictorinox 125th anniversary limited edition 8…

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Forgot to mention you can get a free victorinox paring knife when you purchase this or the anniversary Santoku.

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I second the quality for the price on these. I have a set of Victorinox knives and absolutely love them. They are quite sharp and sharpen pretty easily.

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So watch out if you want the Santoku, the regular version is 8 bucks cheaper than the anniversary edition, and I can't find any details on any differences besides the 125 year logo on the blade. The paring knive is only 6 bucks so you'd be cutting yourself short if there aren't any differences to the blades(unless you want to collect it..i guess).

Oddly enough, the Anniversary Chef's Knife is 4 bucks cheaper than the normal version.

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@cwarriorx: Where did you see it mentioned that free paring knife is included when you buy this or the Santoku? I don't any mention of that anywhere. Regardless, though, I went ahead and bought this. I've been wanting this for a long time, even though I really don't need it. I've still got a Wusthof that's been sitting in my closed, unopened, for about a year, now. What I really want is for Woot to come around with that $59.99 Shun Ultimate Cook's Knife deal. I totally snoozed on it, when it came around about 5 weeks ago. I actually went to buy it, but had waited to long, because my internet connection, for some reason, got really slow, and by the time it was back up to speed and I went to complete the transaction, the wootoff moved on.

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I suppose this is a reasonable deal if you want a cheap chef's knife.

If you want a "deal" on quality knives, you can find brand new Wusthof Classic on Ebay at bargain prices. I bought an 8" chef's knife for ~$60.

Knives are one of those things that just aren't worth skimping on IMO.

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@kooosh: Nobody is skimping on anything, when buying Forschner knives. You're obviously not familiar with the brand, because any professional chef will tell you that they're quality tools. You'll find more Forschners being used in the restaurant industry than you will Wusthof, that's for sure, and for good reason: you get much more than you pay for. To imply that a Forschner is not a quality knife only says that you have no idea what you're talking about, at the least, know nothing of the brand.

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@dazoneranger: Of course you are correct that many restaurants use knives similar to these. So why not go to a restaurant supply store and just spend $10? Point is, these are throwaway knives that are meant to last a few years at most.

If you want something that will effectively last 10-15 years+, you're going to have to do better than this. That's all I'm saying.

EDIT: and there is no need to throw around insulting remarks, like that I don't know what I'm talking about.

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@kooosh: Do a little research and you'll find many reports that Forschners hold an edge better than Wusthofs, and you'll also find reports of people using the same Forschners for 10 to 30 years. My "insults" still stand, sorry. Saying that these are cheap, throwaway knives is just ignorance.

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@dazoneranger: This is going nowhere.

Looks like a $25 stamped blade knife to me. If that's your thing, don't let me get in your way.

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@dazoneranger: Scroll to "Special Offers and Product Promotions" and click add both to cart and you will receive a $6 credit for the paring knife when you check out.

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@dazoneranger: Scroll to the "Special Offers and Product Promotions" area and click add both to cart. You will receive a $6 credit for the paring knife when you check out.

@koosh: Even though Forchner tends to put function over form for most of their knives, their performance and durability is on par or better than many Japanese or German knives costing four times as much. The are the favorite on Cooks Country and have received consistently high marks in reviews across the internet. If you have the money to spend on a Shun Classic or a Henkels 5 star, great, but there is no beating Forchner's price to performance ratio.

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I thought stamped blade = crappy

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Three things you want to look for in a quality knife: 1) High carbon steel; 2) forged blade; and 3) Full tang handle. This appears to have one of the three. Most likely not a bad knife, but you'll be getting everything you're paying for, and probably looking for a replacement after a couple of years of regular use.

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From the amazon description, "Made in Solingen, Germany, the high-carbon stainless steel blade is made from a hot-drop forging process where the metal grain pattern is realigned and is transformed to a stronger material. Forged blades are typically thicker and heavier than stamped blades, and it has a steel bolster at the beginning of the handle and a tang that runs through the handle's center."

Might not be a perfect three out of three, but it seems close.

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I've got a mix of Forschner and Wusthof Classic cutlery, most of which I've had and loved for the past 7+ years. It's honestly a tossup between the two. My Forschner santoku gets a little more use than the Wusthof one, while my wife prefers the Wusthof chef's knife over the Forschner. I prefer the Forschner one, myself, mostly because it's a 10" blade vs. the Wusthof's 8". The Wusthof blades typically cost roughly 3-4x as much.

Forschners are indeed high carbon forged steel. The ones I have are full tang, although just looking at the pictures, some of the Fibrox line may not be.

My santoku is the "plastic" handle variety, which is full tang and has some very dense, more or less scratch proof plastic that fits seamlessly on each side of the tang, and gives the perfect weight and excellent balance.

Inexpensive, yes... cheap? No.

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Also, looking at Amazon's product features.

"Blade stamped from cold-rolled steel; bolsterless edge for use of entire blade and ease of sharpening"

Looks like the Text below that is generic Victorinox/Forschner language, and not necessarily specific to that knife.

The text also explains what stamped means, so the mention of forged steel (stamped from forged steel, and a forged blade are two very different things) is there just to confuse.

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I have both Wusthof and Victorinox chef's knives and paring knives. What I love about the Victorinox knives is the lightness of the knife. My arthritic hands handle the weight much better and I love them so much I give them as gifts now. The paring knives make short work of peeling potatoes and are faster than a potato peeler. Phenomenal buy here! Love it...

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My wife and I are both Chefs and My set is Wustof and her set is a cheap mixed set. I personally sharpen both sets and she has taken 1/2 of my set and uses mine more than hers. I own some victorianox and some forschner blades but they are not in my set that I use. These 2 other cheap knives and I mean cheap are used for cutting down whole meats mainly game, I will not use a $120 knife on game, or when working around a lot of bone. So with this being said all of these arguments are valid, but it is a personal choice of the knife fitting the person. Although in the last 10 years as a professional chef I have never seen a chef or even a cook bring in a personal forschner knife to use in a restaurant.

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@sstelmak: That's a misconception. Mac knives are stamped and nobody will ever say they're "cheap."

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Most Global knives are also stamped.

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http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/129/Chefs-Knives-Rated

In this link, you'll see the results of a comparison of various knives, including high end knives like MAC, Global, Shun, Henckels, Wusthof, and others. Forschner was also in the test. To sum it up, MAC & Global were the best performing knives across the board (in his four tests) and his conclusion was that they were the best performing knives of the bunch, regardless of price. The Cutco, Wusthof & Henckels finished at the bottom of the pack in every test, which also means that the Forschner outperformed those three in every test. This comparison included only high quality, high-end knives (except that Forschner isn't considered high-end, due to the price). I own some Henckels (and even a Wusthof Classic, but it's still in the package) and can say they perform wonderfully, so the fact that they finished at the bottom of the bunch says more about how good the others are, and not that the trailers are bad in any way.

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^^Actually, the fact that the Cutcos were on the bottom actually does speak about how bad it is, as it failed most of the tests, getting a "U"-unacceptable--rating in 3 out of 4.

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Weird...how come I can't see my last, most recent posts, when I sort by "oldest", but if I sort by "newest," they show up? (even more weird is that as soon as I make a post, they THEN show up. What's up with that?)

Anyway, I'm thinking I might be in for another, as a birthday present to my dad. Hopefully, one will show up, before that, 'cause his b-day is in 9 days. Of course, he'll say he doesn't need it, and that his all blue Khun Rikon that he got from QVC is great. I don't know. Are those Khun Rikon knives any good?

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Hey, anybody read the first paragraph of Amazon's description? Here it is:

"A great choice for culinary professionals as well as discerning home cooks, this limited edition 8-inch chef's knife celebrates Victorinox's 125th anniversary with special Jubilee Etching on the blade. The indispensable workhorse of any cutlery collection, a chef’s knife performs a wide variety of cutting tasks, from fine chopping to dicing and slicing. Made in Solingen, Germany, the high-carbon stainless steel blade is made from a hot-drop forging process where the metal grain pattern is realigned and is transformed to a stronger material. Forged blades are typically thicker and heavier than stamped blades, and it has a steel bolster at the beginning of the handle and a tang that runs through the handle's center. A special tempering process is used to produce an edge that can be resharpened over and over again, so the knife can keep its original sharpness throughout the entire life of the blade."

Real?

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@cwarriorx: Looks like I missed out on that one, because I didn't click "add both to cart." Oh well. I don't use a paring knife to often, and I've got a few anyway.