dealsmost quikclot (stops severe bleeding almost…

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Amazon is matching their sale, in case you prefer to shop there and/or have Prime.

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Does anyone know the shelf life of this product? I looked around on the site, and the Mfr.'s site but could not find an expiration date FAQ.

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Quickclot has a shelf life of 3 years, if unopened and properly stored. Just keep it out of direct sunlight for extended period of time. It can handle fairly extreme temperatures, including below freezing. Of course, that 3 years is from date of production.

The 25g pack listed here is nice but is a little small. Even then, it worked well when I needed it on a camping trip - someone cut a capillary in their finger and it wouldn't stop bleeding under normal treatment - pressure and elevation.

I have 25g and 50g packs in my emergency kits

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Additional info - the QuikClot does warm up with use, especially when exposed to water so treat it like a Gremlin. There have been reports that the heat is enough to cause 2nd degree burns but that's better than severe bleeding.

Trivia - the military has replaced use of QuikClot with Combat Gauze and Wound Stat (for when Combat Gauze won't stop bleeding) as of around 2008. Z-Medica makes both QuikClot and Combat Gauze and Trauma Care makes Wound Stat.

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@first2summit: Not so much trivia. It's important.
The military has discontinued use of QuikClot. It's still around in some places (because, hey, that's how we roll) however for front line troops it has been removed from active use for two reasons, one major and one minor.

The minor one is the afrementioned exothermic reaction of zeolite when it becomes hydrated. In large wounds (where medics would pour the stuff in) it threw off a good deal of heat, sometimes enough to cause tissue damage. This was considered a small price to pay for stopping a soldier from bleeding to death.

The major one was the deal breaker. There were several cases of abnormal pulmonary and cerebral embolisms in patients who had received quikclot. The Army comissioned a study (with pigs) to see if quikclot could cause problems in this area. The findings were, put very mildly, extremely disturbing. (continues)

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QuikClot can work it's way into the venous system and remain active. It can cause clots anywhere it lands, including the lungs, heart, brain, kidneys, were ever.

This was really only an issue in very large open wounds (usually deep leg/buttock) where there were large openings in large veins. However, these were the wounds that needed quikclot. At it turns out Combat Gause (kaolin empregnated gauze) works as well or better in these cases, without the risk of intravascular clotting.

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@wilfbrim: Thanks though I said "trivia" as in info, not "trivial." I didn't mean to trivialize or minimalize the discontinue. Just that the good stuff isn't available for civilian purchase. I had tried to add more info to my post re the exothermic effect but was too late.

Was part of the cause of the embolisms with QuikClot - the granule version - is in its use, i.e. pouring the powder into the wound which allows it to travel as opposed using it in its packet?

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Made a mistake - Combat Gauze IS available for civilian purchase - $30 for a 4 yard roll on Amazon. It's odd because some sites say it's gov restricted.

http://www.amazon.com/QuikClot-Combat-Gauze-Yard-Roll/dp/B003N2VQV4

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When my husband learned to use Quik Clot in his combat lifesavers course, they were cautioned to use it only under extreme circumstances because the clot had to be cut out. As in, the surrounding flesh had to be removed as well. Not necessarily a big deal if your HMMV has been blown up, and it's certainly better than dying, but for civilian use, it should probably be treated as a last resort.

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Was unaware that QC had been replaced by woundstat... anybody know where that can be purchased, since it appears to be the less-risky option?