dealsbattery charger w/ 8 aa batteries for $9.99 + $5…

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Will these charge in a regular NiMH battery charger?

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@blaze1984: So - help me out a second here, the way I understand batteries and how they charge is overvoltage - just a tad overvoltage - is applied to charge. So a standard NiMH battery is 1.25 volts. These claim to be 1.5 . I have a pager that uses rechargable AA and has a drop in charger. The charger says 1.3 volts. So then I'm assuming this charger wouldn't charge the battery, correct? Wouldn't the same theory apply, or is a standard battery charger different?

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How do these compare to eneloops or AmazonBasics NiMH?

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@blaze1984: Definitely not. These are ALKALINE batteries and you absolutely CANNOT charge them in a NiMH charger. However, the charger can charge NiMH batteries as well as the batteries it comes with.

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I bought 3 sets of these when they were on woot around a month ago, and I'm quite happy with them.
They are not NiMH batteries, they are rechargeable alkalines.
This means they run at a slightly higher voltage. This can be handy for voltage-sensitive equipment, like some digital cameras and my Flip Video camera (which doesn't last nearly as long on 1.2V Eneloops). I also use a Panasonic Oral Irrigator (similar to a WaterPick) with these and it runs noticeably faster vs. with the NiMH batteries.

I haven't measured it, but the discharge slope seems more gradual than Duracells too, so you get much more warning time on a digital camera (and my Flip), where with the Duracells I get a red battery symbol and 3 seconds later they shut off.

I don't know if they'll last as long as the Eneloops, but they've already paid for themselves, so I'm happy.

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@phirephoto: No, these are rechargeable alkalines.
The charger that comes with them will also charge NiMH batteries though.

Edit: I see @shadowhand beat me to it. :)

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I have 2 charges and 16 batteries and they work great for flashlights and remotes. I would not recommend for Cameras or flashes, use NiMH for that.

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@daefaroth: These are alkaline batteries, Eneloops are NiMH --- These will be 1.5 volts at charge, Eneloops will be ~1.2 --- Eneloops will maintain a constant voltage of about 1.2 volts for most of their useful charge, these will start at 1.5 and drop as they are used between charges like standard alkalines do. Eneloops and other NiMH batteries have lower internal resistance which means they can discharge their charge faster, makes them work better in things such as camera flashes (faster cycle), Eneloops will also last for about 1500 charges where these are good for about 100. The biggest thing for me is that alkaline batteries have this nasty capability of leaking, where as NiMH batteries do not (as long as you don't abuse them by charging them completely improperly.) ... I have no concerns about leaving my Eneloops in devices for very long periods of time, no risk that my expensive device gets destroyed by a battery leak.

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One word eneloops... the one to own. Check around.

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I bought this Jan 2. Love the charger, gave up my other chargers for this one, also use it for NiMH.

1 of the 8 Alkaline batteries has gone bad. A second is a little weak. I have high early failure rates with NiMH too (except for the ones ordered cheap from China).

I've charged standard alkaline batteries too. So far, they haven't blown up. The ones I charged in a NiMH charger did blow up, but not till long after I removed them from the charger. Real mess.

I may order another just to have a backup charger. Some AAA would have been nice.

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I'm an idiot, read his question as will the charger take NiMH batteries, not the other way around.

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@blaze1984: Figured that was the case but I deleted your answer so there wouldn't be incorrect info in the thread.

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The other thing to keep in mind with rechargeable alkalines is that to get maximum life out of them, you should recharge them before they're fully depleted. If you let them run all the way down, you probably won't even get the previously mentioned 100 charge cycles out of them. My understanding is that they do best if you recharge them when they still have at least 50% of their charge left.

Also, to all the eneloop lovers, they're great batteries, but there are several other brands of low-self-discharge NiMHs which do just as well. So you don't necessarily need to get the Eneloop brand as long as you ensure that they're low-self-discharge NiMHs. Amazon and Sam's Club both sell batteries which have tested as well at lower prices than Eneloop.

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Buy eneloops not this junk. Buy eneloops they will last your life and are about the same price.

Rechargable alkaline are not good for any high draw devices. High internal resistance.

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I have a digital canon that I want to buy rechargeable batteries & recharger for. The manual says I can use either alkaline or CANON NiMh batteries, but the latter with last longer. I've read all the comments here and I'm confused about whether these are good for a digital camera, or if I should get the Canon batteries and matching charger. Any thoughts would be helpful.

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I'm getting 3 sets for my Trophy Cam!!

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@palady: Generally, NiMH will last longer in a digital camera compared to alkaline. The reason for that is because they can supply higher current, and digital cameras are power hungry devices.

However, I would highly recommend getting Sanyo Eneloops instead of Canon's NiMH. Canon most likely rebadge some other manufacturer's NiMH anyway, and adds a mark-up for their trouble. Sanyo Eneloops do not self discharge when sitting around unused. The trade-off is that they hold less charge than some other brands of NiMH.

If you need a NiMH charger, I'd recommend either a LaCrosse BC700 or a Maha MH-C9000.

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I don't know if this has much to do with this product but last week i bought a alkaline battery renewer on HSN. It's called Renu-it Battery Recharger. It was $29.95 (i think it's a little cheaper on Amazon. It makes regular batteries (not rechargeable) almost new again. It doesn't work on the new lithium batteries but it works on ni-mh, ni-cd and alkaline AA, AAA, C, D and 9-volt. You can use it over and over many times on the same old batteries. It's about two years old so i'm sure most or all of you have heard of it.

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I bought these about a month ago, and they work great. The charger is worth the price alone. Just ordered three more. It's a smart charger, and haven't felt the batteries even getting a little warm. Heat destroys batteries, shortens life. Not fast charger, takes all night, even longer, but stops automatically when the charge is complete. Will refuse batteries that are too far gone.

These work fine on regular alkaline, if they aren't completely dead. Haven't had any leak on me yet. I have several devices, where that extra 0.3 volts per cell makes a huge difference. I use NiMh where I can, but some things just refuse. So far, none of the batteries have leaked, included or regulars. The included batteries still charge to a little over 1.5 volts. The regulars don't, but most were ready for the trash anyway. Figure my last purchase has already save me the cost in alkaline batteries, and still have a great charger, and useful batteries.

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Ok experts....please help me out. Which type of rechargeable battery type would be best for my Xbox 360 controllers? That's pretty much all I'm going to use them for.

Thanks

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@terdog: I use eneloop's in my xbox controllers, they work great and last a pretty long time ... Amazon Basics would also work well. The xbox controller does not care about the 1.2 volts of NiMH, it will just show 3 of 4 bars pretty much from start to end of battery life.

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These batteries take FOR-EV-ER to charge. My NiMH batteries charge in about an hour or so. These take 24 hours. Re-DAMN-diculous!!!!

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@keithirwin: Could you name brands or post links to the "cheaper than eneloop but just as good" batteries?

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Here we go again. Rechargeable ALKALINEs is a failed technology attempted about ten years ago. I reviewed this idea when they first came out.

They do not last for as many cycles as NiMH cells. If I recall, they work for perhaps 25 - 100 charges, and each time they hold less power.

There is a reason why they are not seen in stores, and NiMh cells are. They are simply not a very good idea.

Eneloops are NiMh cells that have been engineered to hold their charge much longer than standard NiMh cells. Last time I looked, they did this at the expense of some capacity, as in 2000 ma versus 2650 for standard NiMh cells. This may have improved slightly.

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@jazzmark: GP Recyco, Amazon Basics, and Sony CycleEnergy (LSD Version) are good Eneloop alternatives

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Bought a couple sets of these on Woot in the past. All technical advice aside, you're talking less than $2 for each battery that you'll be able to use more than a few times. I use them in my Wii remotes, digital camera, and other household items and they seem to work just as good as the NiMh batteries I have. Plus the charger is nice. Each battery charges independently has has its own indicator light. So if you're looking for batteries and a charger that work for a good price, take a shot with these for $15.

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I bought some of these on the last go-around & have been meaning to ask: Can these be used in a device with a small solar charging panel, i.e. unwired garden path lights?

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On the topic of batteries but off the topic of this deal somewhat. I recently changed to Verizon fios - February to be exact. Already the batteries in the remote that I use most often are failing They are Philips Zinc Carbon AA R6 1.5V. Would these batteries do? If not, what type.

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Another option would be AA NiZn batteries. Voltage is 1.6V, around 30% higher than NiMh, appropriate for high drain applications. I use it exclusively for my Canon cameras. The brand is PowerCenix. It lasts alot longer and shoots more pics than my old and tired NiMh sets.

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@phirephoto: This depends on the charger; if a common type, they will supply a 'lumpy' DC voltage which different meters will measure differing values, depending on how the meter handles it. On a DC range, some of the ripple present will be ignored by most meters while others may indicate a somewhat unstable value of DC because the sample rate of the meter won't be synchronized with the ripple of the measured voltage. A sophisticated charger will have better filtering and apply a voltage that varies with the charge state of the cell it is charging. The most primitive (dumb) chargers will often measure a voltage much greater than indicated, sometimes twice as high, with no cell present to charge.
More than you wanted to know. . .

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If you want rechargeables in order to be more green, then make sure you are ready to commit to one system. If you get a new charger with every four or eight batteries, it's a lot of junk electronics to drag around (most systems don't play together well). so in other words, if you're going to get these, be prepared to get only these in the future!

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@skmccormick: I was just about to ask about cross compatibility of this charger, so thanks for bringing that up.

The charger is listed as compatible for rechargeable alkaline as well as NiMH.

What I am wondering is how nice of a charger is this? It seems like it has individual cell monitoring capacity. Is this a good charger for any of the slow discharge NiMH batteries listed here (eneloop, amazon basic, etc)

I hear complaints of slowness of charge, but that is not a problem for me.

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@msmetz: I have tried to find the specifications on this charger and have not been able to (i.e. is it using Delta V to determine when to stop charging, what is the charging rate, etc.) ... One thing to consider are that charge rate is important when maxing the life of battery, you don't want too slow or too fast... Important things for a charger: Independent charging channels for each battery (i.e. does not require charging in pairs, risk of under or over charging when in pairs), Delta V charge termination vs. Timer based termination, Charge rate, you should never charge at a rate higher than battery capacity .5, but you should also not charge slower than >.1 as the charger could miss the Delta V cutoff (i.e. my 2000mah Eneloops, I charge at 500ma/h with my LaCrosse BC-700 charger, I could do 200ma/h and most likely be safe however there is a slight chance that the charger could miss cutoff and overcharge, I also would never do anything over 1000ma/h (never use a 1 hour charge)

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cont of last post: When charging my Eneloop AAA batteries, I use a 200ma/h charge rate as the capacity of those batteries is less than the AA batteries, a 500ma/h charge rate would actually exceed the *.5 of battery capacity rule. Honestly, if you are serious about wanting to get rid of disposable batteries, I would recommend the investment into a good charger (i.e. Lacrosse BC-700 or Maha) --- I did this awhile back and have no regrets with that decision (now have over 50 AA Eneloops and about 20 AAAs), as well as a few GP Recyco brand batteries.

I would also recommend looking at "Nlee the Engineer" reviews on Amazon for various rechargeable batteries / chargers, this guy has put very in depth information in his amazon reviews (you can find him on the amazon top reviewer board, and he holds the top reviews on the Eneloop batteries there)

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I ordered 3 of these kits. I'm going to use the charger to charge alkaline batteries.
I really don't need the charge as I have the LaCross charger, but if the chargers that come
with it can charge regular Alkaline, this is a good deal. I'm hoping it's similar to this one:

http://www.amazon.com/Rosewill-RGD-CT505-Alkaline-Batteries-included/dp/B004AHPHAM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1335204169&sr=8-2

Gary

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I received your shipment today but in the box I found only 4 batteries - a shortage of the charger and 4 more batteries....John Rigg 972 943 0024 - 3836 Beaumont Lane, Plano, TX 75023

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@txjrigg: The same thing happened to me. While there is only one tracking number in the email I received, it does indicate that there might be multiple packages. So, the chargers may be in another shipment

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@txjrigg @philbob10 - Sorry for any confusion. These likely have shipped separately. If you receive a box with part of your order, please allow a few more days for the rest to arrive. You can email us at service@woot.com for the additional tracking number, or if you have any questions.

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The charger is great. It will charge regular alkaline battery.

I am charging four of them right now. I tested a cheap made in china battery that was measuring 1.3 volt, but after charging it was 1.6 volts!

The charger itself is worth this deal!
Gary