dealscoupons made easy quick start special for $29.99…

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If someone wants one they will have to save 10 cents off every can of cat food for Mr Tinkums' for over a year just to pay for the freaking binder. but then they will be low on staples...

My first effort at putting my thoughts on paper about this fine product probably would have gotten me banned from Woot.

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I usually save about 10 to 15 dollars a week using just the coupons from the local paper. Being organized is a chore, but I'm not carrying a briefcase to go grocery shopping.....My wife saved 50 to 70 dollars a week using coupons but she was REALLY in to it! In God's arms now...

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I have a sister who is one of these people. Her two adult daughters, as well.
I KID YOU NOT, they go into CVS, Walgreen's, Publix, etc. and come out with buggy-fulls of groceries and items worth 100, 200, even $300.....for less than 20 bucks. It's not uncommon for them to actually leave the store with MORE money than when they went in.....along with bags of merchandise (legally.) They do this ON A WEEKLY BASIS. Each of them has an extra room in their homes which they've filled with nothing but shelves on which to store all of this. I go "shopping" there and get good name-brand shampoos, conditioners, OTC meds, canned and boxed foods, etc. that they've gotten for free or for pennies on the dollar.

What they (or the rest of our extended family) can't/won't use gets donated to local churches, food pantries, etc........and when our massive tornado rampage hit nearly 2 yrs ago, they loaded up tons of toiletries, batteries, etc. and had them at the local shelter within hours.

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I don't know about this particular "system"....they developed their own.....but this could be a good jump-start for anyone who wants to get started couponing. It's not a joke.
My sis estimates she earns $40-50 an hour doing this about 10 hours a week.
(And that's tax-free income.)

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couponing is the retail law of diminishing returns. the house always wins; the more people fleece the retailers, the higher the prices go, the more games and gimmicks they're enabled to play. ultimately, it's not ahem worth it.

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@bsirvio:
You really think $20-26K/yr for 10 hrs/wk without having to pay income tax on it is "not worth it"?
For stay-at-home moms or dads, it can mean a significantly better standard of living for the family or even the difference between living near poverty and being able to have some nice things like a second car, savings account, etc.
No college degree or hard work is even required to do this---one only needs a keen sense of organization and paying attention.
You may not agree, but to each his own. shrug

P.S. There is no "fleecing" of retailers involved. They'll even tell you that this makes money for them, too. The mgr of Publix considers my sis one of his best customers and caters to her. She gets awesome extra attention compared to other shoppers. The reason this won't drive prices up is that there is a ceiling % of how many consumers there are who are and ever will be willing to shop this way.

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Our system is slightly different, it involves envelopes and an accordion file, but the principle is the same. With a little (ok, quite a bit of) work, you can save LOTS of money, even get some stuff for free. My daughter and I treat coupons like a part-time job. It can actually be fun going to the stores and searching out the bargains. Nobody is "fleecing" the retailers. We play by THEIR rules. Not everyone has the time or the patience to do this, but for those of us who do, it's totally worth it!

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I wish I could afford to order this. I used to save $$$ couponing when my 1st husband and I first married and I was a stay at home mom with our daughter. I NEED to save money like that, again. Organization is KEY.

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@reginafilangee: She SAVES $400-$500 a week? How much is she spending on groceries each week? If I go to the Acme and buy a TON of crap, it's still only like $200-$300, and we only shop every other week. Granted it's just me and my wife, but still, how does that work?

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Personally i'm just glad that were I live there is a grocery store where I can fill my cart and on a good (don't need milk and other pricey necessities) and check out for around $30. and on a bad day where I'm out of all my basics the bill is still under $50. sadly there are less than 10 branches of this grocery. but at least I don't have to waste time I already don't have or more Money I can't spare on coupons. only real down side is that I have to plan my meals around what they have not what I want, but I can live with that.

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@takethemeatbridge: She has 10 children, 6 of whom still live at home...so they go through a lot of groceries. This is an oversimplification, but if you have a $1-off coupon that can be doubled, and that item is on in-store BOGO (buy-one-get-one free) sale, many items end up being free or they even get cash back at the register. This happens with $10 items all the time w/ manufacturers' coupons. It's complicated, but there are web sites dedicated to maximizing couponers' information. Check their posts and get emails. Places like CVS, Walgreen's, and RiteAid offer "store bucks" (of various names) that you earn when you buy certain items, for use on your next purchase. By keeping track and making sure you use that (as cash) before the next week, it makes a lot of things free. My sis hasn't paid for toilet paper, toothpaste, razors, a wide variety of vitamins/supplements, etc. in years. I was also shocked how much groceries these "drug"-stores carry and you can get for free or low $.

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@takethemeatbridge: Plus, like I said, she and my two eldest nieces who do this with her have each set up huge "pantries" in spare bedrooms, where the rest of us go to "shop"----they make sure that if something works out to be free (or 80-90% off) using couponing methods, they go ahead and get it. (Making sure these things have a long shelf life, of course.) What they don't eat/use themselves is there for the rest of us if we want it, and you might have missed where I said they DONATE a lot of it to needy families.

I'm not exaggerating on how much they save. I didn't believe it myself until I saw it. I'm a very analytical, scientific person (surgeon), so I was skeptical....but it amazes me how much is available, free for the taking, if one is willing to put forth the effort and do a little work. Like another poster above, she and her daughters approach it as being like a part-time job.

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@mrsque: There are free ways to get started. Try this site: It's one word, with the first part being a Southern term for mother, and the second part is a word that means inexpensive and sounds like the noise a baby chick makes. Add an s to the end.
Just google couponing, etc. and you should be able to find it easily. The site has a (free, of course) online guide on how to start.
From their Jan email:
"And there you go. I used coupons and ECB to purchase new ECB generating items. That made it possible for me to walk out of a store with nearly $15 worth of product for less than $1.50 AND I still have $8 ECB to spend at CVS! Even if you only pick up 2 or 3 items each week, it’s worth it."
"p.s. I wrote that post back in May 2010. It’s now January 2013. Here are my CVS savings to date:
Total value of purchases: $2594.68
Total out-of-pocket that we have paid: $167.26
Total ECBs generated: $815.91
Total value to out of pocket savings ratio: 94%"
My sis follows them and other sites.

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@mrsque:
"To save crazy big money at CVS you need to roll your ECBs from week to week. That means you will take your ECBs (they work just like a store credit or gift card) from one week and use them the next week to purchase item(s) that will produce more ECBs. This limits your out of pocket spending and basically let’s you play with CVS’s “money.” Fun, huh?

Of course, you can save even more if you use coupons when they are available. CVS will frequently have something on sale and offer the same amount of money in ECBs as they are charging for the item. (For example, a Schick razor will be on sale for $6.99. When you purchase the razor you will get $6.99 in ECBs to use on a future purchase. Now let’s say you have a coupon for that razor- you’ve just turned that deal into a MONEYMAKER because you will get back more in ECBs than you spent on the product. Coooool!)"