dealsbulldog deluxe 500 2-way remote starter with lcd…

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So I can have even more remotes on my keychain.

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I would like to know how hard this is to install, I've heard a lot about these being installed improperly.

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I got one of these but just the keyless entry without the alarm and i realized there were about 13 wires to connect and decided it wasnt worth my time because I could easily snip a wire to far etc. You cant even buy easy 3way wire attachments for these since the wires are so thin.
Now its just sitting in my trunk "looking good"

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I am a professional installer, and will tell anyone that if you have BASIC soldering skills, you are AOK to install ANY car starter!

Here are some EXCELLENT resources:

www.directechs.com

www.the12volt.com

These are where professionals go to get installation guides! :)

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I don't see the use of it.

1) Most cars already have remote trunk release, and remote entry.

2) Remote start is a waste of energy. Idling a car is NOT an efficient way to warm up your engines. ALL car manufacturers do not recommend idling for more than 30 seconds (yes, you read it right, 30 seconds) before driving off.

Remote starting: 1) wastes energy, 2) fills your garage with toxic exhaust, 3) pollutes the atmosphere and 4) well, it accomplishes nothing other than taking your money.

Given these reasons, why would any one pay money for this?

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How would you do this with a stick shift? You'd have to bypass the clutch electric actuator for the ignition which doesn't seem safe if you're accidentally in gear. Sure the car would stall, but it would lurch. What do you do about the anti-immobilizer car key chip not being in the car? Do you install "ahead of the current"? Sorry for the sorta dumb questions...

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@lll0228: what about in the summer time when your in Arizona and your car is 150 inside it, I could give 2 (profanity) about it polluting or "wasting" a little gas, it saves me a trip out to the car to start it and let it idle with the keys in the ignition unlocked so it can cool off before you put the kids in the car. Ya, that is what it is for Hippie.

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@lll0228: 1) Define "most". My 2007 Toyota is fortunate enough to have keyless entry, but it does not have a trunk release. 2) Remote start may waste energy, but is AWESOME for those of us who live in extreme climates. It'd be nice to get into my car without baking during the summer, or warm up my cabin during the winter instead of freezing my butt off for 5-10 minutes.

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I have remote start in my car. Believe me, when the temp outside is -20F, it beats having to go out and start the car yourself. I don't know about this remote start, but mine only runs the car for 10 minutes and then shuts off.

This is very much worth it if you have extreme cold in the winter time (or for that matter, extreme heat in the summer)

As far as installing this device. I would think a good mechanic would have the expertise to do this. If not, you can point them to the web site mentioned in a previous comment.

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Will this let you start the engine without unlocking the car? We live in an apartment complex and I don't want anyone to drive off with our nicely pre-warmed car :) Also, does the unlock feature only work on cars that have central lock? One of our cars is a 2002 Mazda Protoge and I think unlocking the car is a purely manual process (ie you would have to physically pull the lock button on each door in order to unlock it from inside). I don't suppose the unlock feature would work with it? Also, will this compromise your antitheft system and make it easier for your car to be stolen?

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I can't speak about this product but I have 3 cars with Viper 5901 remote starts w/ security (they have up to a mile range). One of them has the remote start from cell phone capability. All 3 are set to run for 12 minutes. To prevent theft, the minute the brake pedal is activated the remote start shuts off. It locks/unlocks the doors, has trunk activation, and on one vehicle it operates the power rear door.

For those poo-pooing remote start as a waste of energy: When I get in my vehicle in 100+ or -25 temps, I'm comfortable and relaxed which allows me to concentrate on driving instead of wiping the sweat from my eyes or shivering uncontrollably + wearing 2 extra layers of bulky clothes.

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@clicious: with my remote start the car automatically locks when it starts. If I unlock it, then it will shut off. Other remote starts seem to have similar safety/security measures built in. @sdanrich also described how it works for his/her vehicles too.

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@sdanrich: Question: I've been looking at a Viper SmartStart system as well.
How well does it work for you? I keep seeing complaints about the phone NOT starting it or getting server time-out messages...I'm fairly certain I'm going to get it anyway, just curious.

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This is the cheap part of the kit, but if you have a modern car with an immobilizer key you also need to buy a quite expensive and vehicle specific bypass unit. The one I got for my Buick (Compustar system) was like $140. If you call a car stereo company, they'll usually charge $100-150 to install these systems if you just bring them a box of parts, but many only install systems of brands that they sell.

As a fairly experienced amateur stereo installer myself, I found the task to be quite daunting, and paying $150, while not cheap, was a lot better than messing up my car.

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@lll0228... is an idiot, and "most" of his reasons are either invalid for "most" drivers.

I have a manual - assuming I leave it in Neutral, can I use this? Anyone know?

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@racer_x124: If you have a car made before 1970 without much wiring it wouldn't be too hard but on a newer car this would be nearly impossible to install unless you have the service manual for the car with all the electrical diagrams then you will need an electrical engineer to figure it out since cars have over 50 pages of wiring these days. Also, to have remote trunk release, door locks, etc. you will need to install the release actuators to make it work and those don't seem to come with the kit. Why not just use the remote dongle that comes with the car?

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The worst case scenario for self install is you accidentally set off the airbag and it breaks your neck. On most modern cars you'll need several accessories to get the thing to work. On some cars you may even need to call a lock smith to certain things programmed.

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For those of us in Fargo, ND when it's -50 with the windchill these are lifesavers :)

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@joemarfice: In the description: "Works with automatic or manual transmissions."

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in regards to bypass module, I was doing some research on Crutchfield about it, and they showed me the one for my truck at $100. BestBuy wanted $130 (with free install). Same one was $45 on Amazon...BestBuy will install it as a module for the Remote Starter at an additional $30 (on top of the Remote Start kit).

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@dwass: While you may be able to get this to work with a stick shift, it is not a very good idea. They are designed to attempt to start the car until it gets a signal from the engine telling it that it is running. What happens is that the car will try to start and lurch forward and stall if you are in gear. The unit will then tell the car to start again thinking that it failed, rinse and repeat. I have heard stories of people's cars crashing into their houses because of this.

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Almost everyone that would like one of these should just go to your local pro installer and buy one from them and have them install. Most places will do it for ~$150 give or take $30. Remote start is great. I first bought one like this that I thought I could install because I have basic soldering/electronic skills and can successfully do most "handy" things myself. I enlisted the help of my brother that has more experience with cars. Upon starting, we quickly gave up for fear of really messing something up since we couldn't even locate all of the wires required let alone have enough extra wire length work with for non-experts. Just let the pros do it. They can then wire the system to start with keeping the doors locked. I recommend that they also not include the stereo and lighter plugs from turning on to reduce the power draw and don't keep your AC fans on full blast. For those with advanced keys with chips in them, you'll probably have to give up your valet key like I did.

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@nsaan: I'm a hippie who lives in Arizona and I always factor in a remote start when purchasing a vehicle. It just makes sense for the seasons. And starting your car these days doesn't waste nearly the amount of gas it once did with double-barrel carburetors. Not all hippies are patchouli-smelling activists looking for signatures/votes. Just throw your refuse in the right can, Dummy.

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I had best buy install a viper remote start w/alarm and it cost right around $325. This was about 5 1/2 years ago.

BUT, I've always been tempted to try installing one of these on a cheap car to experience just how daunting it MAY be. It's just wires, people. Little strings of metal with plastic around it. Anything you do can be undone (including replacement parts for anything you may burn out). Bookmark the two websites provided above and give it a whirl!

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RE: Manual trans and how it works: you arm the system, with the car in neutral and park brake on. Then remove your key... the engine stays running. You lock and close your door. The system then shuts off your motor. It knows the vehicle is in neutral since the doors are closed and locked. It can then start your vehicle for you when you push the start.

Of course this practice (leaving your car parked in neutral) is not legal in some states that require you to leave your manual transmission vehicle in gear when parked.

I've had one of these for years and it's worked great... no range issues at all. It's great for winter, but even in summer, I always start my car while walking up to it so the engine gets the oil going before driving... 250K plus miles... great oil pressure and cylinder compression.

Sitting with the car running at stop lights waists much more fuel that starting my car with my remote start.

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I bought two of these. At first I was concerned because my girlfriend's car had a security system and the bulldog website said I would need an external adapter to get it to work. I was on the fence about buying it but then I saw this actually included a universal security bypass. Bulldog's site also has all of the wiring diagrams and I even found a few pictures for my car model. Hopefully I don't screw up the install...

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I want one so, so bad. It sucks going out to start your car in -15 or below weather. Seriously - it takes a LONG time for your body to stop shivering after that...

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http://www.bulldogsecurity.com/bdnew/vehiclewiringdiagrams.asp

has wiring guides, and lists of extra parts you may need (relays, bypasses, etc)

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@stevec5000: Thanks for the reply. I'm one of those people that live in the -50f range in the winter and would like to warm my vehicle before I drive it. However at the risk of messing with my only daily driver I might just pay the dealer to install an OEM unit.

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@lll0228: If you have ever needed to plug your car in, if you have ever seen temperatures where metal will snap like plastic if you don't warm your car up for 30 minutes before driving it, if you've ever seen temperatures so cold that diesel engines freeze until spring if you shut them off to go into the store, you wouldn't ask such an inane question.

Even for those people who like their comfort and prefer to have their vehicles cooling down on a hot day when they slide in, or warm when it's frigid outside, find uses for the auto-start. The fact that this one can also replace your existing keyfob to open your doors, etc, and still only have one large item on your keychain is convenient.

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@sgrman05: So far, no time-out issues. I have the SmartStart GPS module.

For all others: Yes, with the Viper 5091 in my cars, the doors lock when the remote start is activated.

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@stevec5000: Are you an installer? How are you familiar with remote start devices installed in stick-shift cars?

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@billabond1: LOL. In the computer industry that's known as user error, among other more colorful expressions. It's up to the USER to use the parking brake, etc.

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@romeojn: I think you and a lot of other people are confusing what a remote starter does with what a block heater does. In extreme cold, a remote starter is a "creature comfort" device that essentially wastes fuel and actually causes MORE wear on your engine, especially if you don't have a block heater. For cold weather, all you really need is a good block heater setup specific to your vehicle. A block heater setup will also allow for quicker passenger compartment warming and defrosting.

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pulled the trigger, going to TRY to install it on my fiance's '04 Taurus. Has anyone had any experience with this site, good or meh?

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@orionantares: What planet or country are you living in and what are you driving there? Today's engines (sold in and to America) are designed to push the 200,000 mile mark and you're worried about the stain idling is going to place on it? If cars couldn't idle they wouldn't have an idle mode. So long as you keep your oil up to date and level, you'll be fine letting it idle for 5-10 minutes.

Please substantiate your claims with data or websites where we can find said data.

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@katanaryda: Kudos (and a vote) for having some intestinal fortitude

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@orionantares: Block heaters are excellent for the extreme cold winters up north and usually a necessity. But, for regular seasons, remote starters are all one would need (outside of a garage) to handle any climate; leave the a/c on in summer and start from the comfort of your living room; leave the heat on in winter and start from the comfort of your bed! Also, my Viper system came with instructions on how to program it to start throughout the night at various intervals of time in case one found themselves in an extremely cold environment that they feared would hurt their vehicle.

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@waker1: If you need a simple starting point you can start from this basic overview article from last winter: http://green.yahoo.com/blog/daily_green_driving/96/eight-facts-about-warming-up-your-car-in-winter.html

The key is today's engines are designed differently from yesterday's engines. Who cares about the 200,000 mile mark? If you treat a modern engine right you can easily double that.

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@orionantares: Good article. I do remember reading that at one point. And I actually shut my car off if I'll be sitting still awhile (drive thru, long traffic lights, bank atm etc). Unfortunately, at the time and now, I can't seem to find any real compelling evidence for some of their arguments. I certainly agree that modern vehicles don't need warming up but I take issue with the idea of getting into a 150+ degree car!

Carbon buildup was a bigger problem for the carburetors they mention being out of vogue. Simply running fuel system cleaner once every few months as well as regular maintenance intervals (oil changes, spark plugs, air filters etc) will keep your engine plenty clean.

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@orionantares: Outside of pure want and need, you're right. That article provided some great links to more information. I've been reading for at least a half hour now. It's nothing I didn't know before but made a good reminder. You're right. A block heater would be great for cutting down the need to run the engine for comfort.

I apologize for being so defensive. You've won me over in all but the summertime. I'll double up efforts on the compost pile to offset the extra carbon! Keep up the good fight!

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@lll0228: It is amazing for diesel trucks since they have to warm up in the cold. Thus the reason why I have one.

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A lot of misinformation going on around here. You can install on a stick shift with only two extra wires, the ebrake wire and the door trigger wire. This way when you leave the car with the ebrake on and the door is open the remote start knows the car is in neutral and it is safe to start the next time. Also idling your car with a remote start does absolutely nothing to cause any extra wear and tear lol. Do you turn off your car at every red light, atm, train crossing etc? I've installed literally hundreds of these from many various brands and it is not easy. If you don't have at least a basic grasp of soldering, reading a multimeter and the 12volt wiring system you might want to leave it to a pro. It would probably be an all day task for a diy'er. Also to do trunk and locks do not need to install actuators if your car has those power options already, you just connect the wires to the wires going to the switches. A warm car in the winter and cold in the summer is a nice thing though.

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The system says it includes a security bypass, this is probably their transponder bypass and you may need to give up and extra key if it doesn't learn the code. The bypass will transmit the code from the key to allow the car to start without the key in the ignition. Also the car can not be driven with a remote start as said earlier, if you touch the brake it dies. Not to mention the wheel is locked until a key is in. Wasting energy LOL really? Guess what, I buy the gas I'll run my car at idle all day with no one in it if that's what I want to do. If you start buying my gas then you can make such ridiculously absurd comments. Some people just like to argue against everything and will find the most idiotic reason to do so. 10 minutes of idle costs about 25 cents. Anyone I know would gladly pay that to have a warm car in the winter climate I live in.

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This is now $10 cheaper - same seller, but through eBay (I posted the deal). I'm kind of bummed because I bought two of these three days ago when this deal was first posted, so I spent $20 more than I would have if I had waited.

I just clicked "a want one", and it took me to 1saleaday's site, but a different item. So if you want one of these, go to the deal I posted - they're $64.99 with free shipping now.