dealsusb turbo charging adapter for ipad, android, and…

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Is this thing like magic or what?

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@yaacov: It tricks the device into thinking the cable is its "preferred" charging cable. Apple is especially bad at blocking standard (there actually isn't a standard) USB wall chargers. USB, by default, only provides 100mA of current. A USB device can request more - up to 500mA. USB chargers don't implement the USB protocol - they're just a dumb wire hooked up to a power supply. Sometimes a lot of power - 1000-2000mA.

Different devices use different methods to determine that a cable is capable of providing a higher power without USB signalling. This adapter shorts a couple of pins (typically the data pins) on the USB plug to convince the device it is connected to high-power cable.

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would this device change a standard USB wall plug to give more juice for a faster charge? I notice some USB wall plugs seem to cahrge my devices faster than others do, not sure if it is my perception or if that is even possible? Sorry I don't have much knowledge of this stuff. :)

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@sumduud

The rate at which you can charge your phone depends on your phone and the charger you use. Rechargeable batteries have a maximum current they can receive. If your charger is capable and your phone allows, it will charge at the maximum current. Most new chargers nowadays are switchmode power supplies so they switch how they operate to regulate the output voltage depending on current drawn. For example, you can use a 3.1 Amp charger to charge your phone, even if it can only take 1 Amp. The load (your phone) draws the current it needs and the charger regulates the voltage. If you charge your phone on a USB 2.0 port on a computer, the maximum current the port can supply is 0.5 Amps, so all things being equal, it will charge half as slow as it could. Depending on the charger/how it is wired, it may have the data pins shorted together, which usually helps for most phones, but others use resistors to set different voltages on the data lines to identify what it is. HTH

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@sumduud: No. It doesn't make a charger more powerful. It just ensures the phone detects it as a high amperage charger when it normally can't for compatibility reasons.

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If I'm reading this right there is an extra security benefit to this device. It allows you to charge on someone's computer with out giving them access to your data.

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@yaacov: Everyone above me is wrong.. They just don't want you to know that yes it is indeed magic.

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http://www.amazon.com/Oster-Retro-Chrome-Beehive-blender/dp/B00021LN8U/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top
Oster 500 watt, mine is well over 5 years old. We only use it for ice. We burned up other blenders.
Reading the reviews it may be that they changed the body from metal to plastic.

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@caffeine_dude: methinks you answered on the wrong thread, can't believe you are being down voted for an honest mistake, grrr. try http://deals.woot.com/questions/details/85cc7b6f-3acb-443e-a2ee-9eb34fbe2d3f/can-you-recommend-a-good-blender#13
PS, I am still using a 60 year old oster beehive.

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@a70chevy: It might also burn out your USB port - the device might try to draw more power than it's being given by the host computer.

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@omnichad: Most, if not all computers have overcurrent protection built into the USB host controller

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@zygomatic: If it's USB certified, then it does. But there are a lot of USB hosts that don't have certification - like my car stereo, for example. Not sure how much power it can even provide, but it expects data pins connected so it's probably designed for 500mA.