deals65w equivalent - 15w dimmable led light bulb for…

18
vote-for4vote-against

costco carries 60 watt equivalent LED dimmable bulbs for $9.99 currently

vote-for1vote-against

I just checked their website. 60 watt LED dimmable is $17.49 each in a four pack not $9.99.

vote-for-2vote-against

15 bucks for a lightbulb? Have people lost their minds? For 15 bucks it better cut some grass or do some luandry. MY one light would require six of these bulbs. No way you get your money back in electric savings verses my standard incandescent 60 watt bulbs that cost $1.00.

vote-for3vote-against

@ecriscit: Besides the energy savings, these bulbs last MUCH longer than cheap incandescents. Up to 50 times longer. Add in that if you live someplace warm, the incandescents make your AC have to run more in the summer.

Also, many spots are inconvenient to change bulbs. These mean that you need to drag out the ladder and change those bulbs much less frequently, which is also a plus.

If you live in a cold climate, and are planning to move soon - these probably aren't worth it. I live in Phoenix and am planning to be in this house for years - I would never use plain incandescents.

vote-for3vote-against

I've upgraded most of the main lights that I use in my home to LED bulbs. I haven’t changed a bulb in three years.

vote-for2vote-against

@miniskunk: I just bought them yesterday, but that was in-store. I guess you can't get that price online. My gain.

vote-for1vote-against

Costco has 4pk. 65 bulbs for $74.99 online

vote-for1vote-against

@bmullin: that's 18.75 each for that set. it's 4 bulbs, before you confuse anyone :)

vote-for0vote-against

@ecriscit: And with an average lifespan of 15-20 years, you also save over buying multiple standard bulbs. That adds on to 15 years worth of electric savings. One more benefit is the fact that standard incandescent bulbs are only 50W now anyway and dimmer.

vote-for3vote-against

@omnichad and @akrasian

Don't get me wrong, I have some of these new lightbulbs, been testing a bunch of them to see if they live up to the hype. (let me state that I do not have a $15 dimmable one to give a comparison to).

The life span of these lights are not in years, but rather hours. If you read the fine print on the new lgihtbulbs, they talk about how their lifespan is shortened by how often you turn them on and off and how long the light is on for (if it gets "warmed" up or not before being turned off). The new lightbulbs are terrible in bathrooms, a five to ten year lightbulb lifespan equates to about 2 years of real life. THe lightbulbs give an equivalent abmount of light once they warm up, not immediately as with an incandescent. Depending on what color of light you want in the room, you may pay more for the bulb that gives daylight vs. soft light. Overall, these lightbuls are good for high out of the way lights that aren't used often (to me).

cont'd

vote-for4vote-against

My point in posting was this 6 bulbs in my light at $15 a wack is $90. The six bulbs I have in htere cost me .99 + .06 in tax = 1.05. I really doubt that over the lifetime of the bulbs I will save 88.95 in electric. Since they don't last as long, I will likely replace them lets say 4-5 times. I already have a bunch of them in inventory, so I will keep my costs the same at 1.05. 1.05 x6 = 6.30. I still find it hard to believe that I will save 83.70 in electric over the lifetime frame. A 60 watt bulb uses .06Kwh per hour used. If I have six of them in the light I will use .06Kwh x 6 per hour used. A full Kwh of energy costs me Residential (RS) 6.948 cents per kWh. IF you can see the long road I am travelling here, the bulb won't pay for itself unless possibly used in a business 24 hours a day 7 days a week never off.

Don't let me get started on how some of these bulbs aren't as green as the hype indicates. I think shrdlu used to point this out on this site often.

vote-for2vote-against

@ecriscit: Agree with you 100%. I have incandescent decorative globe bulbs in my bathroom (meaning they are turned on daily) in my house I purchased new in 1993 that I have yet to replace. Maybe I've got real 'clean' electric current or everyone else here that need to replace their 'immediate light' incandescents so often have the opposite? I've have/ had some 'green' bulbs here and there (at various stages of green technology) in other areas of my house and their performance just doesn't cut it. Not to mention many seemed to have failed prematurely. No way am I stupid enough to spend $15 on a single bulb thinking I'm going to get a money savings with normal use. Maybe when they are around $2 I'll give them a shot.

vote-for2vote-against

I had a cheapo incandescent bulb last 20 years in a hall light. It was used daily and served as main lighting for the laundry area.

I use CFL bulbs in any light that stays on for an extended period and haven't tried LED bulbs outside of automotive applications and they have a shorter lifespan that reg bulbs.

The word 'Green' is over used and not applicable for many items we buy.

I'm putting in a heat pump water heater today so some of the technology makes sense but replacing perfectly good incandescents with CFL or LED technology just doesn't make cents.

vote-for0vote-against

@ecriscit: I think you are confusing LED lights with CFLs, LEDs don't need to "warm up", but CFLs, do, some more than others.

I get a couple of free CFLs every couple of months from my power company. Those are even cheaper than incandescent.